PDA

View Full Version : New dyslexia & dysgraphia diagnosis--support/ideas?



5amigos
01-16-2012, 01:27 AM
My 9 year old (3rd grader) was just diagnosed with dyslexia and dysgraphia. It didn't come as a surprise obviously, since that was why i pulled him out of PS and put him through rigorous testing because I *knew* there was something going on. But, I kind of held out waiting for the "final word" because I wanted to know how to proceed.

He reads quite well, but doesn't comprehend or retain information. He can't spell even the simplest sight words, and gets so so so frustrated with writing and getting anything down on paper.

I know many of you work with your kids with dyslexia and I'm just wondering if anyone has support or resources that you love, hate, can't live without, etc. I just feel new (and overwhelmed) by this new world.

I ordered All About Spelling and thats where we are starting!

laundrycrisis
01-16-2012, 07:17 AM
I wish I had many answers for you. Where did you go for the diagnosis ? Mine is as yet not diagnosed.

Learning to type has been helpful. The listening and then answering questions part of WWE1 has been helpful for him. I believe the listening practice has improved his reading comprehension. He does the copywork in a word processor because doing it by hand would be too much. When he finishes WWE1 I will move him on to WWE2. He does one week of WWE1 in a sitting and that seems to be about the right amount of time to push him a bit.

I do every subject I can with workbooks that require him to read and then answer multiple choice questions or write short answers. I found workbooks for science and history. I also use a wide selection of workbooks for language arts. I especially love the Flash Forward Reading workbooks from Barnes and Noble. They are colorful, interesting, have good questions, and are in nice high-contrast print. Also Royal Fireworks Press has a set of Aesop's Fables workbooks that require the child to read a short story, then look at a picture and write one sentence about the picture. This has been really helpful. He has difficulty with sentence composition, not just handwriting, so the "write one sentence" exercises have been exactly what he needed. I skip the rest of the exercises for the stories, but just have him write the sentence. I also have him practice editing for mistakes in Evan Moor's Daily Language Review workbooks. Even the level 1 version has enough to challenge him.

Staysee34
01-16-2012, 07:46 AM
All About Spelling is a wonderful resource. I've seen a marked improvement in my DD10's reading/spelling ability using AAS. Although I'm not completely new to the dyslexic world, I am new to homeschooling and like you, I'm still trying to figure out what works and doesn't. We also use Math U See as many of DD's issues carry over across all academics. To some degree she has dyslexia, dysgraphia, and dyscalcula (spelling??). She also has ADD which in the research I have done seems to go hand in hand with dyslexic children in a majority of cases. Anyway, here's a website for you if you haven't looked at it already. There's lots of useful information here. http://www.dys-add.com/

5amigos
01-17-2012, 01:11 AM
Thanks for the input. I'm glad we are on the right road with AAS. I will also check out that link.
We went to a psychologist that did a full neuropsychological exam using several methods of testing over a total of 8 hours, spread out on several days. so i feel like they really got a pretty decent snapshot of my son. Funny though, this son doesn't have ADHD, but my other son (his triplet brother) does, in addition to aspergers. so, we've got a little of both, but not in the same child. :) makes for some real fun school days around here, i can tell you that!
The psychologist suggested a lot of keyboard work, getting him a Franklin speller, and letting him dictate, which i already do a lot of. It is just nice to now be armed with specifics on his strengths and weaknesses so I can put more focus on how he learns best. I learned a lot about both boys, most of which I knew already, but some specifics to their individual styles of learning that I think will help our days go a little smoother. ...we hope!