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Marmalade
05-25-2010, 01:58 PM
I just wrote out this really lengthy post and I hope that it's not too long for this place!

My family has gone from public school, to home school to unschool all in the course of one year. One year ago today we were anxiously awaiting the end of another grueling school year for my daughters so that we could spend a family vacation in Disney World…in the blazing heat (hello? Florida? Summer? BRUTAL!). By the end of the summer we were sold on home-schooling and jumped in head first.



We started with very eclectic random “curriculum” that I tried to design myself. I felt like I was 10 years old again and playing school with my little sister. I found great (and cheap) courses for my girls and my son officially started learning letters and numbers and such.



Since we jumped in so quickly I was still learning about homeschool. Before we made the decision I thought there were two kinds of homeschools-the “School at Home” and “Unschool”. Little did I know that there were so many different ways of being a homeschool family! Charlotte Mason, Waldorf, mish-mash eclectic…the list goes on. I started studying each different style to look for the right fit for my family. I was happily eclectic during that time, buying and trying out different work books-spending hours finding online programs to supplement the activities they were learning and yet still not quite feeling “it”.



For my birthday in early 2010 my sister gave me a $20 bill. I don’t know about you guys but if someone hands me money (and for some reason I already have a full tank of gas) I immediately start browsing Barnes and Noble’s book shelves (thank goodness for the internet!) I decided I wanted to read more about child-led learning. There wasn’t much to choose from at B&N-but since they were down the road and I had cash I pretty much had to go there. I picked up a book called “Successful Homeschool Family Handbook” and read it cover to cover that very night. While it had a lot of good points about childhood education it really wasn’t what I was looking for. I knew in the back of my head that I wanted to explore unschooling-but I also knew that I was scared to death of it. I was so used to structure-preparation-and well…guidelines! But a few days went by and we were getting ready to go to Disney World again…this time in February…this time during a school week when the park wouldn’t be so crowded!...I needed a book for the trip so I went back to B&N and bought “The Unschooling Handbook” and accidentally read it cover to cover that night.



Something about that book…the ease of it…had me sold on unschooling and after a lengthy discussion with my husband we decided to give it a go. We went away for a week and came back and didn’t crack open the books. At first it felt like we were still on vacation-then after a bit it felt like we were doing something dreadfully wrong. I started panicking-my husband started feeling uneasy-and the kids had no idea what was going on. I don’t think either of the girls really understood the concept and I don’t know if we did so much either. We decided to go back to a really relaxed style of homeschooling and that lasted maybe about 2 weeks before we stopped trying. I spent my nights reading Sandradodd.com or joyfullyrejoycing.com or just re-reading my book. I looked at websites and read life-learning stories-became obsessed with unschooling blogs…and finally..finally I feel like I’ve come to the point where I feel relaxed enough to say that we are a family of unschoolers.



We certainly are in what is described as “de-schooling”…and I’m challenging myself to say yes more often….we aren’t “Radical Unschoolers” but I kind of feel like that is the natural progression. Even if we simply stay “Academic Unschoolers” that will be fine.



The changes I’ve seen in my children really make it all worth while. My youngest daughter and oldest son would bicker constantly-now it’s just every once in a while. Which is a huge step. They happily read about subjects that interest them (and would be approved by someone looking at the book to see if they are being educated) as much as they happily play their favorite video games. My son is learning so much more than “numbers” and “letters”…he’s learning …well…just about everything!



Even the changes I’ve seen in myself are definitely a huge plus. I’m more relaxed. I’m not always trying to control the situation….I’ve learned to let go…I’ve learned to trust. I’ve learned to ask myself why I’m saying “no” to a request-



As far as eating goes…it kind of comes with everything else. My children do not sit around all day playing video games…at least not every day…but they can…if that’s what they want to do. They also don’t sit around all day eating donuts –even though if they really wanted to then they could. The options are there-but they are just that-options. We are a family of fruit lovers, broccoli is one of our favorite foods-and the kids actually complain if I put cheese on it! I used to think that “if left to their own devices my children would become Cheetos” and things like that-now I’m just amazed. They are left to their own devices-and they aren’t Cheetos!



I seem to be over the initial panic…I’ve figured out what I need to know about portfolio evaluations and I’m able to focus more on providing my children with a nurturing environment rich with plenty to do. I’m seeing the worth in simple things, like cooking or making signs-just as much as I saw the worth in bookwork and times tables!



I hope to never become someone who looks at other styles of homeschooling as being wrong. I know that each and every one of us is doing what we know works best for our families-and that we all see our families growing from it. I know that setting up a curriculum and/or giving tests, while it’s certainly not our thing, is valuable to other families.

Shoe
05-25-2010, 02:07 PM
Very interesting blog post.

I'm far too uptight to even attempt unschooling with my kids...but I have decided to give them an "independent study" time where they can choose whatever and however they want to learn, and the method in which they demonstrate some kind of learning or mastery of it. No guidance from me, except as they request it. But, I'll still be teaching them a fairly standard curriculum the rest of the time.

camaro
05-25-2010, 02:21 PM
Thoughtful post, Marmalade. I find myself wanting to move toward unschooling and think I've done that somewhat, but my boys are still very young and I'd like them to have some of the basics before we're complete unschoolers. So I guess I fall into it somewhere between you and Shoe. We started our homeschool adventure last August and kind of did the school-at-home thing for a while and it just wasn't working. Since then we've relaxed quite a lot and we're all a lot happier and I see my boys learning plenty of things beyond traditional school subjects, too!

hockeymom
05-25-2010, 02:47 PM
Great post, Marmalade. I'm deeply attracted to the idea of unschooling, but a couple things hold me back. My son (7) thrives on structure, although that does seem to be relaxing somewhat. Also we have very few resources where I live--no homeschool groups or community, no rec center classes, no special homeschooling opportunities, so everything we do is up to me to figure out. That's fine, but we have a lot of time on our hands and the structure helps fill up our days (for now anyway).

Like David, I can see moving that direction in the future, when my son is a bit older and after we've relocated to somewhere with more opportunities. For now, I feel we need to work on the basics, but since we've only just started homeschooling I'm sure our approach will change in time.

Thanks for sharing your story! :)

crazymama
05-25-2010, 03:02 PM
This is a wonderful, fresh look kinda post!! I LOVE it!!

I dream of being an unschooler.. and we kind of are... or maybe we are just super duper relaxed ecclectic kinda homeschoolers. I don't know, not a fan of labels here..lol, but I love to watch my kids learn from the world around them, see endless knowledge available in the tv programs that are rotting their brains, but in the same breath I don't mind saying.. "Hey, lets go play with our Funtasic Frogs stuff".

patti
05-25-2010, 03:32 PM
Great post, Marmalade! Sounds like your kids are learning naturally.

Our family educational philosophy is best described as Semi-unschooling (http://indieeducation.blogspot.com/2010/04/blast-from-past.html). We arrived at that after trying school-at-home (complete with desks and timed classes), the Total Chaos method (do whatever you want while I try to keep the toddlers from dismantling the house) and many more. It all works, to a degree, but our approach fit our family best most of the time.

Glad that you've found your rhythm!

Snoopy
05-25-2010, 06:34 PM
(...)so that we could spend a family vacation in Disney World in the blazing heat (hello? Florida? Summer? BRUTAL!).

Sure, RUB IT IN! lol.

Hey, great post and thanks for sharing your journey. While I can say with confidence that we will NEVER be radical unschoolers, I am slowly relaxing my approach. My goal isn't to unschool but to do whatever I can to promote the joy of learning in Noah. Like Hockeymom's son, he seems to thrive on structure, so I have to take this need into consideration as well. But he learns so much outside of our structured school time! He loves history and plays Age of Empires II on the computer a lot and this morning, as we were playing the Professor Noggin's Explorers card game, he was able to answer some questions thanks to that game and also thanks to a history song that he's been listening and singing to. Without mentioning all the stuff he's learned through Scooby Doo and Spongebob Squarepants, according to him! I just need to trust that he will gain more knowledge from activities, books, shows, that he truly enjoys than from boring lessons from mom :) Still, I WANT him to understand the fundamentals of math really well so he doesn't repeat my own failures so I don't see me relaxing more until probably Middle School.

Marmalade
06-03-2010, 12:40 PM
Thank you all for your responses!

I kind of have a confession to make....

we kind of...

well-we want to kind of go back to our more relaxed eclectic style. I've talked this over with everyone and we all like it better. I'm still going to keep an unschooling mindset-and I'm still never going to grade or anything....but we all kind of miss curriculum.

Is that bad? I know it's not-but I feel like I had this huge epiphone and then the very next week I had another one.

oh well-C'est La Vie!

hockeymom
06-03-2010, 12:50 PM
I'm glad you "confessed" your change of heart because that's what's going on in our house too! Initially I thought we'd be waaaay more structured but now, and maybe we're just in summer mode, we're more relaxed--yet there's still plenty of learning going on. I think it's great that you can talk to your kids about it and they can give you honest input--you have a very healthy family dynamic! From what I read here and around the blogosphere, homeschooling is an ever evolving adventure--styles and mindsets are bound to change, as are interests and passions...and isn't that so much of why we homeschool? So we can embrace those changes? Good for you--have fun! :)

reversemigration
06-03-2010, 01:49 PM
I think that y'all are going with what works best for you, rather than forcing yourself into an "ought to do." You didn't impose it, you didn't do it arbitrarily...your family is finding out how they like to learn. Like hockeymom says, interests and mindsets change!

hjdong
06-03-2010, 02:47 PM
We go in waves of how structured we are as well.

StartingOver
06-03-2010, 04:04 PM
We go in waves of how structured we are as well.

We also go in waves, at least in the early years. It all changes for me in the Logic Stage ( middle school-ish).

Marmalade
06-03-2010, 04:13 PM
I'm glad to hear that a lot of other people go through this!

But it's fun-we're learning what we like!

inmom
06-04-2010, 09:57 AM
so I don't see me relaxing more until probably Middle School.

Nathalie:

That's interesting, as I see us going the other way. I would describe ourselves as having been relaxed eclectic homeschoolers these last 5 years. But now with the kids at middle school level with high school looming (kids are already doing high school level math: daughter-algebra, son-geometry), I feel that we need to be a little more "buttoned-up" during these years. I don't want any decision we make remove the option of college if they desire to go. Just being a worry-wart.....

Snoopy
06-04-2010, 10:25 AM
Nathalie:

That's interesting, as I see us going the other way. I would describe ourselves as having been relaxed eclectic homeschoolers these last 5 years. But now with the kids at middle school level with high school looming (kids are already doing high school level math: daughter-algebra, son-geometry), I feel that we need to be a little more "buttoned-up" during these years. I don't want any decision we make remove the option of college if they desire to go. Just being a worry-wart.....

I guess it would depend on the individual child's personality too. If Noah was anything like his older brothers, I'd definitely "button up", like you said, during the Middle School years instead of relaxing. I'm hoping that Noah will learn to work more independently and responsibly (I guess the responsibly part is what's lacking in my older boys, unfortunately) and want to do more on his own because he will actually be self-motivated to seek knowledge and achieve his goals, rather than wait for me to spoon-feed him information. I'll still definitely be checking that he's doing what he needs to do to graduate (I'm kind of hoping he might be able to do dual enrollment once in h.s.) and knowing me, it'll be hard to relax!

crazymama
06-04-2010, 10:32 AM
I think I love being in the catagory of relaxed eclectic ;) We love learning from life, but I think we all enjoy some guidance as well.

Marmalade
06-04-2010, 11:21 AM
I think I love being in the catagory of relaxed eclectic ;) We love learning from life, but I think we all enjoy some guidance as well.

That sounds exactly right, crazymama!

bairdmomma
06-21-2010, 11:05 AM
"The changes I’ve seen in my children really make it all worth while. My youngest daughter and oldest son would bicker constantly-now it’s just every once in a while. Which is a huge step. They happily read about subjects that interest them (and would be approved by someone looking at the book to see if they are being educated) as much as they happily play their favorite video games. My son is learning so much more than “numbers” and “letters”…he’s learning …well…just about everything! Even the changes I’ve seen in myself are definitely a huge plus. I’m more relaxed. I’m not always trying to control the situation….I’ve learned to let go…I’ve learned to trust."

I completely agree! For the first year, I tried a more structured approach with workbooks and daily lessons that drove us all crazy! I began to wonder if I had made a disastrous mistake. At first, I thought unschooling could be treacherous...in that I wondered if someone like me would manage to teach them anything if I was so laid back. But, I have to say that unschooling works for me & my four kids. My oldest is in public high school, but when he comes home, he misses his little brothers and sister and always plugs in to see how he can help, or what he can teach them too-he feels like a mentor!

After a period of de-schooling-and that was hard!-they naturally opened up and began to let me know, and quite vocally-what they wanted to know, what interests they wanted to pursue! And, in getting them engaged in those things, I found they remembered far more "facts and figures" that they picked up along the way! They were learning with far less misery!

They subsequently have blossomed beyond anything I thought I'd see, and I am so thrilled that I didn't give up!

I think that part of our mentality-especially for public school educated parents now homeschooling their broods-that says that if the learning isn't "hard" or the kids aren't sufficiently miserable, we haven't tried hard enough. That's bs because learning should be fun! Isn't that why most of us started down this journey in the first place?

Good luck!

MamaB2C
06-22-2010, 09:00 AM
I have a friend with a son who is also 4 and she has committed to unschooling. I am teaching mine to read because he was ready for it and I feel that if he reads well, he can learn anything. We are relaxed about it as far as how much we do any given day, and how often, but there is definite instruction going on.

Her son asked her if he can learn to read, and she said she wouldn't teach him, but would put some stuff out for him to learn on his own, because that's how unschooling works in her opinion.

If your kid asks you to teach him something, wouldn't teaching him/her still be unschooling, because it's the child's desire? It seems to me that by refusing to participate at the level the child requests you are also imposing your choices on him/her rather than following their lead. Maybe I don't understand or maybe she doesn't.

Snoopy
06-22-2010, 09:29 AM
Her son asked her if he can learn to read, and she said she wouldn't teach him, but would put some stuff out for him to learn on his own, because that's how unschooling works in her opinion.
If your kid asks you to teach him something, wouldn't teaching him/her still be unschooling, because it's the child's desire? It seems to me that by refusing to participate at the level the child requests you are also imposing your choices on him/her rather than following their lead. Maybe I don't understand or maybe she doesn't. I'm trying hard not to judge, but I'm failing. I just can't understand this train of thought. I'm all for kids trying to figure out something on their own first (but if they don't succeed, then I help) or even after I have given them an explanation. But telling a 4 year-old to teach himself to read? Yikes. And frankly, I think that's sad for that little boy.

Marmalade
06-22-2010, 09:47 AM
There are so many different ideas as to what unschooling means....but I just don't understand the logic behind not helping a child learn how to read when the child asks for it! Sure-unschooling generally means shying away from curriculum....but as far as I know it doesn't also mean you have to let your child figure it all out for himself.

(Me-also trying not to judge...)

mjzzyzoff
06-22-2010, 10:09 AM
Last night my husband and I attended a meeting of local unschoolers and I am about 9/10 of the way sold. The only thing holding me back is math. Perhaps because I simply want to get DS through 4th grade math (fractions, so he can help me cook!) and perhaps because I already purchased our math curriculum for next year!

So today I have been researching unschooling, reserving books on it from our library, and trying to figure out how the hell I'm going to let go of my control issues!

One thing I keep running across, regarding the parent not teaching the child to read, is the definition of unschooling. It seems to me most resources point out that it is "child-led learning" instead of "child-independent learning", and I agree it seems rather silly not to help a 4-yr-old who requests it. HOWEVER, giving the child books is a method of offering help (the child would not have access to those otherwise). I also don't think unschooling is necessarily shying away from curriculum, rather, shying away from a FORCED curriculum. Of the homeschoolers we met with last night, many mentioned their children will request worksheets at times. The difference is they are not required to finish the worksheets and don't get a grade! (except one mom, whose daughter kept asking her to grade the worksheets!)

If I had a 4-yr-old who requested to learn how to read, would I stick a book in front of them and trust them to do it alone? Not exactly. I might do that at first, continue reading together, make sure the child sees me reading all the time (which isn't hard, I DO read all the time!), and offer a lot of encouragement. Perhaps what we're missing here is the whole story...

Marmalade
06-22-2010, 10:23 AM
Perhaps what we're missing here is the whole story...

Very-very true.

I wish I hadn't been so quick to judge.

I'm sure this boy lives in a very text-rich world and the mom truly believes he will become a reader on his own.

MamaB2C
06-22-2010, 11:55 AM
That was pretty much the whole story, which is why I was confused. Also, she had previously been all about Waldorf, and I didn't know at first she had switched to unschooling. She is pretty natural living; home births, non-vaxing, no video games for the kids (though dad can play), no computers for the kids, very limited TV, no plastic cups/bowls, and limited plastic toys, very little processed food, etc. so I can see where radical unschooling fits in with her worldview. M is her son and A is mine

The conversation went like this:
Her: "I told M that A is reading, and he asked to learn how to read."
Me: "Are you going to teach him to read, or are you going to make him wait until he is 7 as you said once, based on Waldorf"
Her: "Later I'll teach him, but for now I am just going to put some books out for him to look at, as in unschooling they learn on their own"

I had read a bit about unschooling, and assumed that it is fine to offer instruction, even formal instruction, to a child that requests it.

Snoopy
06-22-2010, 12:08 PM
Oh ok then. She didn't mean she would never help him, which is what I had understood... also, I don't understand the "I'm going to put out some books..." Does this mean that she also restricts access to books?! We have books all over my house and when the kids were little, they would end up all over the floor because they were constantly looking at them from the moment they were about 1 or so... if that's one thing I don't restrict, it's access to books.

BPier12
06-22-2010, 12:09 PM
The conversation went like this:
Her: "I told M that A is reading, and he asked to learn how to read."
Me: "Are you going to teach him to read, or are you going to make him wait until he is 7 as you said once, based on Waldorf"
Her: "Eventually I'll teach him, but for now I am just going to put some books out for him to look at, as in unschooling they learn on their own"

I had read a bit about unschooling, and assumed that it is fine to offer instruction, even formal instruction, to a child that requests it.

Wow, I'm a bit perplexed by your friend's attitude. Obviously, each family needs to decide for itself what is appropriate for the children involved, but if I had a four year old child asking to be taught how to read, I would be jumping up and down with glee, grabbing a book and snuggling with the child on the couch immediately. I hope that he does not end up frustrated in his desire to learn.

jessicalb
06-22-2010, 12:11 PM
It is fine to offer instruction to kids who request it. In fact, that is pretty much what unschooling actually means. Unschooling isn't "OMG NEVER TEACH" it's "help kids learn what they need in the way that best serves their humanity and their education".

I've read a bit about extreme unschooling and Waldorf ideas, and frankly, I think they are bad bad bad. On the radical fringe, pretty much any rigid set of ideas can be bad, though.

MamaB2C
06-22-2010, 12:12 PM
He has access to books, but she asked me what book I was using for teaching reading (The Reading Lesson), and she meant to put out the curriculum for him to look at! I just sort of dropped it because I couldn't understand not actively teaching a child to read who has asked to be taught.

Sorry, didn't mean to confuse everyone, I just thought it was weird that the kid ASKED and she didn't jump on that with both feet.

bairdmomma
06-23-2010, 01:44 PM
I think that is one of the unfortunate misconceptions about unschooling. That by letting children learn on their own that parents and instruction should be absent. If my son or daughter asks me to teach them something I am definitely going to, with whatever resources I can drum up.

My daughter recently wanted to learn how to make bead jewelry, so I enrolled her in a class at a local store, bought some books & materials, found youtube videos on technique and tried my hand at it with her. She directed what she wanted to know, and did the work herself, but I was there to help her-and I paid attention to any "concrete" state standards that she was using so I could emphasize them, i.e. measurement, cost analysis (because she now sells her creations) among other concepts. She said she never felt like she was being "instructed" which is awesome in my opinion.

My 7 year old is trying so hard to read, he works at it every day but I still have to make sure that he is presented with all the tools to be successful but without the pressure to be at some arbitrary competence level.

Her son is only four and there is plenty of time for her to get it right-he's still really young. Hopefully she does or he'll eventually stop asking. :( or get really, really bored.

Shoe
06-24-2010, 11:31 AM
Gosh, this whole thread has really made me realize how little I know about a lot of styles of homeschooling. I know of unschooling, but didn't realize there were a lot of differences in opinion about it and I still don't really know anything about it. Waldorf...I've heard the term but don't know the first thing about it.

I've got my summer reading cut out for me, I think.

warramra
06-24-2010, 12:04 PM
Gosh, this whole thread has really made me realize how little I know about a lot of styles of homeschooling. I know of unschooling, but didn't realize there were a lot of differences in opinion about it and I still don't really know anything about it. Waldorf...I've heard the term but don't know the first thing about it.

I've got my summer reading cut out for me, I think.

Don't do it!!! LOL You'll end up like me. I've read about just about all the theories and approaches and have done nothing but totally confuse myself. I love ideas from all of them, but not a single approach in whole.

We have run the gaumet from school-at-home, to unschooling. Right now we are very much relaxed eclectic. I would love, love, love to unschool but I have control issues and really like planning unit studies. And, I like the neo-classic approach so much that if I was homeschooling myself that is what I would use. Unfortunately, everytime I have tried it with my two oldest they become very stressed out. Writing is very difficult for both of them and they are very creative spirits.

For the last two months I have wavered back and forth over what we will do next year.... unschool, unit studies, a more set program for certain things, etc. I know we will keep T4L for Language Arts and their current math programs, otherwise I just don't know. There is so much I want to share with the kids, yet at the same time I love to watch them explore and learn on their own. I would really like my children to find their own personal passions and focus on those, yet there are books and ideas by the thousands I want to be the one to tell them about. Unfortunately my children aren't helping in guiding me to the right approach, they like to have to do lists and want to 'do school', yet I see them grow so much more when we are in unschooling mode. They look like this :eek: when I ask them what they want to learn about.

Amy

MamaB2C
06-24-2010, 12:21 PM
Unfortunately my children aren't helping in guiding me to the right approach, they like to have to do lists and want to 'do school', yet I see them grow so much more when we are in unschooling mode.

On the secular homeschool Yahoo group, someone posted the most amazing independent study guidelines, that seem, to me would offer the best of both worlds. I have bullet pointed her major points and added a few things.

Choose a topic (either you assign it or let the child choose it)
Assign that the topic be researched, and a final presentation be completed that includes the following:
One writing project (blog article, news type story, simple report)
One applied (real life) math project
One science experiment as well as scientific and historical info
I would add one creative/art project, either a multimedia presentation, drawing, photo collage or lapbook, short story, poem, play, "commercial" whatever!

Child must use at least one textbook, one "living" book, one video, and one website.

Marmalade
06-24-2010, 12:22 PM
Don't do it!!! LOL You'll end up like me. I've read about just about all the theories and approaches and have done nothing but totally confuse myself. I love ideas from all of them, but not a single approach in whole.





That's funny-when we started homeschooling I insisted on learning everythng about everything...I spent so many hours learning about the different styles and seeing how different families do it.....but now I feel like I have some sort of information overload! I wonder if things would be smoother if I knew less! We could go on being happily eclectic and I wouldn't even know that's what we were.

It is strange to see the different ways people view unschooling-even unschoolers themselves view it in different ways. And it seems like the internet is some sort of big world of cliques with different views and it's hard to not try to conform to one of them.

That's it-I'm making up a new homeschool style. It's called My Style...you guys should all try it! Here are the rules:

1. Do what you want to do how you want to do it in the way that works best for your family.
2. Try not to compare yourself and stop thinking you are messing your children up.
3. Enjoy.

StartingOver
06-24-2010, 12:45 PM
That's it-I'm making up a new homeschool style. It's called My Style...you guys should all try it! Here are the rules:

1. Do what you want to do how you want to do it in the way that works best for your family.
2. Try not to compare yourself and stop thinking you are messing your children up.
3. Enjoy.

That's us, My schooling !!

SherryZoned
06-24-2010, 12:47 PM
This is a tough one..

I would love to just unschool but the truth is the kids would not learn some basic skills lol! I can barely do math or remember proper grammar. haha

Also, in the real world you have to do paperwork, you have to sit and focus. Maybe not for every job of course but there are forms upon forms just being an adult. I figure having a bit of a structure is easier for me but good for them. For when they do go into a job they will have to deal with stuff like that.. Or maybe at least that is how I justify it in my mind!

hockeymom
06-24-2010, 01:34 PM
That's it-I'm making up a new homeschool style. It's called My Style...you guys should all try it! Here are the rules:

1. Do what you want to do how you want to do it in the way that works best for your family.
2. Try not to compare yourself and stop thinking you are messing your children up.
3. Enjoy.

I LOVE it!! :)

reversemigration
06-24-2010, 02:22 PM
That's it-I'm making up a new homeschool style. It's called My Style...you guys should all try it! Here are the rules:

1. Do what you want to do how you want to do it in the way that works best for your family.
2. Try not to compare yourself and stop thinking you are messing your children up.
3. Enjoy.

I think this sounds perfect. I'd be heretical, though, and add rule #4: Be kind to others who do it differently than you.

warramra
06-24-2010, 03:37 PM
That's it-I'm making up a new homeschool style. It's called My Style...you guys should all try it! Here are the rules:

1. Do what you want to do how you want to do it in the way that works best for your family.
2. Try not to compare yourself and stop thinking you are messing your children up.
3. Enjoy.

That is it!!! I just need to remind myself of #2 on a daily basis.:D

Amy

Shoe
06-25-2010, 02:35 AM
That's funny-when we started homeschooling I insisted on learning everythng about everything...I spent so many hours learning about the different styles and seeing how different families do it.....but now I feel like I have some sort of information overload! I wonder if things would be smoother if I knew less! We could go on being happily eclectic and I wouldn't even know that's what we were.

It is strange to see the different ways people view unschooling-even unschoolers themselves view it in different ways. And it seems like the internet is some sort of big world of cliques with different views and it's hard to not try to conform to one of them.

That's it-I'm making up a new homeschool style. It's called My Style...you guys should all try it! Here are the rules:

1. Do what you want to do how you want to do it in the way that works best for your family.
2. Try not to compare yourself and stop thinking you are messing your children up.
3. Enjoy.

Just perfect for me. I guess I can skip all the reading I was planning to do now :).