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opheliag
01-12-2012, 04:00 PM
We have used Easy Grammar 2 and 3 and are now using 5 (we skipped 4 somehow). My son is halfway through the book. This week, he had a cumulative review at the end of the adjective chapter. It was basic stuff that he should have learned earlier in this book and in other books. He missed just about every question. I am so upset. It was stuff like underline the subject once and verb twice. List the linking verbs. Underline the direct object. Stuff like that. He missed every compound verb and noun. He underlined object of prepositional phrases as subjects. Every section and almost every question was wrong. His writing lacks every bit of punctuation except the basic period. (This kid is always reading and reads well above grade level, so it isn't a lack of reading.) I was talking to him yesterday and told him some word should be hyphenated, so he put quotation marks around it. He thought quotation marks were a hyphen. I am so frustrated.

We talked about it briefly, and I was told that grammar is stupid, hard and doesn't make sense. Whoever invented grammar should just be shot. I pulled out a copy of Eats, Shoots and Leaves by Lynne Truss, and we discussed the poor panda. Did the panda eat, shoot and leave, or did he eat shoots and leaves? I showed him how a comma could really change the sentence. He found that funny and admitted that sometimes grammar is necessary.

Should I give up on Easy Grammar and find something else? Should I just give up on grammar for a while and focus on writing?

Thanks for letting me vent! :)

Marmalade
01-12-2012, 04:24 PM
Have you looked into Analytical Grammar? I have put grammar on the back burner with my 10yo until we start that.

I can't get into the website at the moment-it may be down but here is Cathy Duffy's review of it: http://cathyduffyreviews.com/grammar-composition/analytical-grammar.htm

I know that Analytical Grammar talks about not even introducing grammar until 5th or 6th grade. They have "Junior Analytical Grammar" that is introduced in 5th and 6th grade and it takes about 11 weeks and then you just leave grammar alone-then you move on to Analytical Grammar and that is taught in a certain time span and then every week there are review pages. If you can get into the website you can watch the videos that the creator made-very informative.

http://www.analyticalgrammar.com/junior-analytical-grammar

Sorry for the lack of real information-I seem to be nursing a migraine-hopefully someone chimes in with better information.

AmyButler
01-13-2012, 11:04 AM
I have an MA in English, and to be perfectly honest, grammar did not make a bit of sense to me until after I had taken Latin in college. As a new homeschooler, I don't know what all is out there and available, but if you can find something on non-raditional grammars, it might be easier and make more sense for him. One of my profs was involved in a study in NYC Public Schools in the 80s that compared groups studying traditional grammar to those studying non traditional, and the writing and understanding of grammar was more than a grade level above for the non traditional students by the end of the school year.

dbmamaz
01-13-2012, 04:20 PM
What counts as non-traditional? I'm somewhat light academically, esp w my younger, but all we've done so far is mad libs and some schoolhouse rock videos. I think it does get covered some in the Language Smarts textbook, but i'm not doing any stand-alone grammar at this age, I dont see the point. one freind who is doing Calvert said her son is very frustrated that he has to do the same thing every year over and over for grammar, and she says thats just what grammar is . . . but to me, that means it shouldnt be done full time every year. Often if they dont get it now, they'll get it better in a year, and fighting over it doesnt always help them learn it.

Staysee34
01-13-2012, 04:37 PM
We struggled with this as well at the beginning of the year. I finally settled on Growing with Grammar and Winning with Writing. However, we certainly don't do it everyday. We do 1 or 2 lessons out of each book 2 or 3 days a week. If we hit a wall, we take a day and do mad libs or just skip it all together. I point things out in their other work like "Hey, maybe you need to check number 3. I think somethings missing. I'm pretty sure there needs to be a capital at the beginning of that sentence." I also randomly ask them about parts of speech. "Hey, that's a great sentence. Is the word run a noun or verb?" Maybe take a little time away from it and point things out as you go along in his other courses and pick it up again later.

opheliag
01-13-2012, 04:56 PM
Thank you everyone for your insights. After I calmed down a bit, I was able to see the issue a bit more clearly. First, I was an English major and happen to love grammar which is coloring my view of the situation; I want him to do well with it because it means so much to me. If this had happened in math, I wouldn't even worry about it. We would just go back over the chapter, review it all, and try it again. Since it is a subject that is important to me, I think I'm blowing it out of proportion a bit. Secondly, I realized that even though I loved grammar in high school and college, it didn't make a bit of sense to me in elementary school. I was kind of befuddled like he is now.

I love the ideas about MadLibs and just doing some orally for a while. I found a book of Oral Language Exercises that just help to get the ear used to hearing proper usage, and we will also talk about the parts of speech in different sentences as we go through the day. Besides that, I think we are going to focus on writing and just let it go. He is not having it, and I want him to enjoy learning in all subjects.

The Annalytical Grammar program looks great. After we get back to a good place, I think we will try it. It looks like it would fit better with his style of learning anyway. Thanks again!

AmyButler
01-14-2012, 09:52 AM
What counts as non-traditional? I'm somewhat light academically, esp w my younger, but all we've done so far is mad libs and some schoolhouse rock videos. I think it does get covered some in the Language Smarts textbook, but i'm not doing any stand-alone grammar at this age, I dont see the point. one freind who is doing Calvert said her son is very frustrated that he has to do the same thing every year over and over for grammar, and she says thats just what grammar is . . . but to me, that means it shouldnt be done full time every year. Often if they dont get it now, they'll get it better in a year, and fighting over it doesnt always help them learn it.

Basically, traditional grammar is a latinate (inflectional language) grammar imposed on English (positional language), non traditional grammars are organic to the english language. Non traditional grammar explains the things that are exceptions in traditional grammar (all those "except in the case of" bits). It is also called structural grammar. I did a bit of googling, but mostly what I was finding is academic papers. As effective as non traditional grammar is though, I would be very suprised to find that there isn't a homeschooling curriculum that employs the methods.

dbmamaz
01-14-2012, 11:35 AM
The only real formal grammar I've taught so far was Micheal Clay Thompson and his 4 level analysis. but we didnt get to verb tenses and voices, just parts of speech, parts of the sentence (subject, predicate, objects), phrases and clauses.

Avalon
01-15-2012, 11:07 PM
The only time we covered English grammar instruction in school, as far as I can recall, was in Grade 8, when we did a fairly lengthy unit. I really don't remember learning grammar in elementary school at all. On the other hand, I was in French Immersion from Kindergarten through Grade 9, so we learned a lot of grammar in French. I think I picked up a lot of grammar just from learning French, and needing to have a certain vocabulary in order to compare English and French.

I just started using Grammar Town with my 12yo, and I find it interesting to note that she has no idea what it means to "conjugate" a verb, and doesn't have the vocabulary about "first person singular" or "third person plural." I'm not worried about it, but I have decided that it's worth covering.

If your 10yo isn't "getting" grammar, I would probably drop it for a couple of years, and try again when he's 12 or 13, especially since you've already done so much.

lakshmi
01-16-2012, 03:55 PM
I love that feisty attitude. and your QUICK response with the panda book!

Skip it.

Grammar is important sure, but maybe in the context of something else? History?