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Jackielyn
12-12-2011, 10:29 PM
is the words out of my 9 yr old's mouth. I don't know if I'm looking for advice or just a sympathic ear...sorry if this seems disjointed but I guess I'm just writing down my observations and maybe some reasons he is feeling this way...I have a couple ideas about WHY he would say this. First off, we were having a discussion today about what his likes and dislikes are. He pretty much dislikes school...period. I'm frustrated because I'm trying and pulling out resource after resource to help him. This craptastic attitude may be due to the weather and the lack of getting outside...he would much rather run around and play all day if he had the choice. While I agree he should play, there are certain responsibilities that should be taken care of during the day...I'm trying to talk to him about compromise...I give a little, he gives a little.

So I asked him why he dislikes school...he says it makes his head hurt. I'm like "Thinking makes your head hurt?" He currently wears glasses and we are waiting on his new prescription to come in...reading makes his head hurt, it could be his eyes...one theory. Another theory, maybe he isn't developmentally ready for the information he is learning right now...I don't think so...but throwing it out there. It could explain his frustration. My other theory is I just haven't figured out the right way to present it. I'm really struggling with finding a happy medium between pen to paper and using the computer. It's this love/hate relationship with technology...agh. He does really well with games and videos. So I am trying to combine a little bit of paper work and the online games and videos. And I would say he only really struggles with Language Arts...which is probably entirely age appropriate. Maybe I should back off until he is 10 and try again (or at least six months). I am using the Mosaic history curriculum as a guide for history and he does seem to like it. It includes a book to read (which he needs more of, won't voluntarily read) And I bought Ancient Science to go along with it. Maybe I should keep the whole LA low-key for now and try again later...
I don't worry about math as he will willing sit down and do it and usually without too much fuss.

OK...I may have answered my own question...sometimes it just helps to type your problem out and talk it through. If anyone has anything to add please feel free...

Stella M
12-12-2011, 11:57 PM
Thinking makes my head hurt too :) Hope you can resolve things in a way that works well for both of you!

Gabriela
12-13-2011, 10:14 AM
My 9yo actually says his brain hurts sometimes. We're getting him glasses too.
But, he can stay on task a really long time on certain things. So I think you're right in looking for new stuff that might work better.
Lately I've been finding that saying things like "you're going to be doing a lot more reading in 4th grade" and that usually motivates him to try harder, because he really wants to move forward.
I also found that using the "easy" stuff for developing focus works really well. So, maybe I think he could be working at a "harder" level, but I think learning to concentrate and complete work is just as important.
If something is taking too long, or he gets too frustrated, I either jump in and help him with it, or save it for later and work on something else.
I think avoiding frustration is key at this age.

farrarwilliams
12-13-2011, 10:42 AM
Truly, a wise kid. It makes my brain ache too.

But, um... in a more practical way... Can you do more stuff orally? Can you trick him into thinking sometimes, in real life and then be like, "Did that make your head hurt?"

Jackielyn
12-13-2011, 04:59 PM
My 9yo actually says his brain hurts sometimes. We're getting him glasses too.
But, he can stay on task a really long time on certain things. So I think you're right in looking for new stuff that might work better.
Lately I've been finding that saying things like "you're going to be doing a lot more reading in 4th grade" and that usually motivates him to try harder, because he really wants to move forward.
I also found that using the "easy" stuff for developing focus works really well. So, maybe I think he could be working at a "harder" level, but I think learning to concentrate and complete work is just as important.
If something is taking too long, or he gets too frustrated, I either jump in and help him with it, or save it for later and work on something else.
I think avoiding frustration is key at this age.

I agree, avoiding frustration=happy Corbin (and happy mom ;) )


Truly, a wise kid. It makes my brain ache too.

But, um... in a more practical way... Can you do more stuff orally? Can you trick him into thinking sometimes, in real life and then be like, "Did that make your head hurt?"

Oh yeah, we do a lot of stuff orally. His writing curriculum...yeah I write but he tells me what to write. And I have also started introducing the keyboard so he can hopefully start typing for his writing curriculum.