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Faygo
12-08-2011, 06:07 AM
Hi, we are just a couple of months into homeschooling and for the most part, we have homeschool in the morning then a break (usually an hour) and then more homeschool in the afternoon. About 3 hours total of homeschool. My son is in the 2nd grade.

Some days we have a field trip or end early because it just feels right. Typically, we have school M-F, but sometimes on Saturday if there were field trips or lax sort of days during that week. I try to get Math in every day. We skip around our MBtP curriculum and SOTW. We also do Spectrum LA workbooks and ETC, which we typically do daily as well.

So, what does your day look like? Thanks :)

hockeymom
12-08-2011, 06:15 AM
We "do school" 4x/week, and co-op once a week. Often one day a week there are field trips with co-op as well, so we either do light schoolwork beforehand, or skip it depending on the trip.

We are often at the table doing table work by 7:30 (for us that means cursive, spelling, math, history, science). If DS is feeling motivated and engaged with his work, we can easily be done by 10 or even earlier. If we're working on a project or the morning has been difficult for some reason, it might take until 11. We rarely work past that.

The rest of the day is ours to play, read, explore, whatever. :)

Sherry
12-08-2011, 06:54 AM
Our day usually starts with a read aloud. Sometimes this is our subject of the day, other times just interesting books. After breakfast and dressing/grooming, we have piano, followed by seatwork - math, HWOT, poetry/picture study, and ETC. Then we have a break before reading, subject of the day (or read aloud), a hands-on activity, and when possible, an hour outside. Our starting time and ending times vary. We can be done by noon or just starting at noon. On a typical day, we do 10 minutes of piano and 45 minutes to an hour of seatwork in the morning. 30-40 minutes of reading and read alouds in the afternoon. Activities take anywhere from 15 minutes to more than an hour depending on the activity and children's interest. On field trip and outside commitment days, we school lightly or not at all.

Our subjects are history, literature, science, geography, and character
This year's activities are music, arts and crafts/cooking, science project/nature walk, and swimming lessons (p.e.)

Gabriela
12-08-2011, 09:43 AM
We're just finishing up 3rd grade, and our first year homeschooling. We started with a four day week, but it was too packed, so we upped it to 5.
We start at 8am and finish at 5pm, with a 30 min break in the morning and 90 min break for lunch.
We do language arts, math, and read alouds every day in the mornings. History, science, third language, and art in the afternoons.
Art is participation in a program with other kids, twice a week all afternoon.
We have a long schedule because my son is not a fast worker, but is thorough.

MrsLOLcat
12-08-2011, 09:52 AM
Third grade seems like a big jump from second to me. I'm not sure why, but one of my teacher friends says the same thing happens in PS. Something about reading/writing fluency making a big jump for most kids. Whatever the reason, we have longer days now, too. Last year we would finish somewhere between 10 and 11 a.m. every day. Now it's more like 12-1 p.m. (with a lunch break) before we get done. We start around 8 after we get back home from taking DD to school. We work five days a week. He chose the order in which the subjects are taught: Spelling/grammar, math, writing, history, science, and electives (Spanish, Latin, piano, art, logic... we do one or two per day). He has swim two days a week in the afternoons, and we do something with our homeschool group every few weeks. Library days are Wednesdays after we pick up DD. I read a chapter out of a book (we're almost done with the Little House series) to both kids at bedtime.

Busygoddess
12-08-2011, 10:17 AM
My daughter, 8th grade, pretty much makes her own schedule. She just tells me what she's going to do & shows me her work.

For my son, 2nd grade, this is how our day goes:

Start school by 9. Many days we start at 7:30 or 8, 9 is the latest. We do Math, Language Arts (Writing, Vocab, Spelling, Grammar), and Latin.
Then, we fit in Music, Computer Programming (Mon), ASL (on Wed), Spanish (Tues & Thurs), and Art (a days a week). Usually, we get all that done by lunch, if not we squeeze it in after lunch.
Lunch 11:30-12
free time 12-1
1-2 Free reading
2-4 Geography (Mon), Science (Tues & Wed), History (Thurs, Fri)
Somewhere in the day, we fit in read-alouds

hreneeh
12-08-2011, 10:31 AM
2nd grade here. We usually start around 8am with math. Move right into MBtP after. If he's jumpy I send him out to go run or do chores or ride his bike for 15 min between. We're usually done by 11am. School is usually a 4 day a week thing for us, but math is at least 5 if not 6 days. It only takes 45 min or so.

Faygo
12-08-2011, 11:45 AM
What do you use for Computer Programming? Thanks


My daughter, 8th grade, pretty much makes her own schedule. She just tells me what she's going to do & shows me her work.

For my son, 2nd grade, this is how our day goes:

Start school by 9. Many days we start at 7:30 or 8, 9 is the latest. We do Math, Language Arts (Writing, Vocab, Spelling, Grammar), and Latin.
Then, we fit in Music, Computer Programming (Mon), ASL (on Wed), Spanish (Tues & Thurs), and Art (a days a week). Usually, we get all that done by lunch, if not we squeeze it in after lunch.
Lunch 11:30-12
free time 12-1
1-2 Free reading
2-4 Geography (Mon), Science (Tues & Wed), History (Thurs, Fri)
Somewhere in the day, we fit in read-alouds

theWeedyRoad
12-08-2011, 03:43 PM
We start ... when we start. Generally it's in the afternoons, lately, although I liked it much better in the mornings. I'm trying to chill out a bit, so we are slowing down and I'm much less concerned about missing a day here and there. I shoot for 5 days a week (with Fri as the light day) but right now if it's only 3 or 4, so be it. It isn't like their brains shut off on days 4, 5, 6, and 7 :P

So here it is... ds's is in flux atm:

Both kids get a clipboard of work/visuals for the day (this keeps their sanity and mine).
Ds: reads for 15mins.
LA (spelling (2 days), grammar or effective writing lesson (daily), copywork or journal (daily), vocab (daily)
Math (daily)
SS (mon, tues) or sci (wed, thurs). Geography is generally on mon, tues as well.
Music (thurs) or art (fri), twice a month health (tues)
gym (3x a week)

This will change after this month. We stop creative writing and transition into report writing. As soon as we are done the ss book we are doing US history instead.

Dd- generally same schedule:
I read to her (daily)
She reads to me (daily), right now I'm trying to sneak in silent reading but she hates it.
Phonics (she reads 10 words with our new sound, then does a worksheet below her level)
LA-(spelling, grammar or elements of writing, copywork or journal)
Math (daily)
Geography (mon, tues) or sci (wed, thurs)
Music (thurs) or art (fri)
health (twice a month)
Gym (3x a week)

We don't take breaks during the lessons unless the kids say they need one (or I think they do). My kids can be a bit hard to get started after breaks, so I find it easier on all of us to just plow on, but I DO keep the most intense stuff (reading for dd, writing for ds, math) before the breezy classes, so if they are pooped for the sci discuss/vid it's ok. I also tried to put the stuff least liked (reading is hard for dd, ds hates it, LA is no one's favorite) first, and the fun stuff last so they would stay in the game ;)

Stella M
12-08-2011, 03:54 PM
Well, right now it looks like this:

Ds gets up and blogs on his new blog, clicks around doing some 'research', builds stuff with Lego, does stuff, jumps on the trampoline A LOT, has 2 x read aloud sessions, watches TV, does other random playing stuff, talks all the freaking time so we have a lot of conversational learning, makes spreadsheets of the toys he is selling and how much he'll have once they're sold and how much he needs to buy the games he wants, checking how his vegie patch is going, talking, jumping, computer etc in rotation until bed. We're unschooling...

Dd12 is on holiday. She blogs sometimes.

Dd14 is completing a maths unit before she goes on holiday. She is doing a lot of machine sewing. Today is our final book club - Dicken's A Christmas Carol. Yesterday was her final Modern History class for the year. She will take a shorter summer break than the other two and resume maths. So she'll be doing school lite with some maths most days and some Civil War and quilting studies other days.

I read to both the girls most days...

Busygoddess
12-08-2011, 06:33 PM
What do you use for Computer Programming? Thanks

This year we're using Logo Adventures (http://rainbowresource.com/product/sku/LGADCP/6823d116be7097aeb83369d4). Next year will be Logo Works (http://rainbowresource.com/prodlist.php?subject=2&category=8012). The year after that, we plan to get ds KidCoder (http://rainbowresource.com/product/KidCoder%3A+Year+Pack+Textbook+Kit/KCYPTK/6823d116be7097aeb83369d4?subject=2&category=9661) & dd TeenCoder (http://rainbowresource.com/product/TeenCoder%3A+Year+Pack+Textbook+Kit/TCYPTK/6823d116be7097aeb83369d4?subject=2&category=9660).

Faygo
12-08-2011, 07:42 PM
I'd love to see your son's blog! I've been thinking about having my 7yo start one and get an email address, too. (With supervision of course).


Well, right now it looks like this:

Ds gets up and blogs on his new blog, clicks around doing some 'research', builds stuff with Lego, does stuff, jumps on the trampoline A LOT, has 2 x read aloud sessions, watches TV, does other random playing stuff, talks all the freaking time so we have a lot of conversational learning, makes spreadsheets of the toys he is selling and how much he'll have once they're sold and how much he needs to buy the games he wants, checking how his vegie patch is going, talking, jumping, computer etc in rotation until bed. We're unschooling...

Dd12 is on holiday. She blogs sometimes.

Dd14 is completing a maths unit before she goes on holiday. She is doing a lot of machine sewing. Today is our final book club - Dicken's A Christmas Carol. Yesterday was her final Modern History class for the year. She will take a shorter summer break than the other two and resume maths. So she'll be doing school lite with some maths most days and some Civil War and quilting studies other days.

I read to both the girls most days...

Faygo
12-08-2011, 07:42 PM
Thank you :)


This year we're using Logo Adventures (http://rainbowresource.com/product/sku/LGADCP/6823d116be7097aeb83369d4). Next year will be Logo Works (http://rainbowresource.com/prodlist.php?subject=2&category=8012). The year after that, we plan to get ds KidCoder (http://rainbowresource.com/product/KidCoder%3A+Year+Pack+Textbook+Kit/KCYPTK/6823d116be7097aeb83369d4?subject=2&category=9661) & dd TeenCoder (http://rainbowresource.com/product/TeenCoder%3A+Year+Pack+Textbook+Kit/TCYPTK/6823d116be7097aeb83369d4?subject=2&category=9660).

AddlepatedMonkeyMama
12-08-2011, 08:01 PM
We're pretty scheduled this year with my first- and second-graders:

8:45 to 10:00: One kid reads on the couch while I sit with the other one for penmanship and math, then they switch.
10:00 to 11:15: Snack and morning break
11:15 to 11:35: Spelling
11:35 to 11:55: French (daughter only... son does Latin with my husband before he leaves for work)
12:00 to 1:00 Lunch and read aloud
1:00 to 2:00 Quiet time!!!
2:00 to 2:30 History (M-W-F) or Science (T-Th)
2:30 to 3:00 Geography, Logic, Grammar, or Art

The rest of the day is snacks, playing, and extracurriculars (swimming lessons, etc.) This is our schedule just about every day, Monday through Friday, unless we have a field trip planned or something special comes up. It's about 2.5 to 3 hours a day, not including read alouds.

Stella M
12-08-2011, 08:36 PM
I'd love to see your son's blog! I've been thinking about having my 7yo start one and get an email address, too. (With supervision of course).

Sure :) It isn't very intellectual though! It's a Mario blog :)

I like the use of blogs for LA.

Even though this is about Mario, ds does research, he types, he works on spelling, he uses multiple computer functions etc...so the work that goes into it I'm happy to call 'educational' even though the content isn't.

http://allaboutmario-mamamia.blogspot.com

lakshmi
12-08-2011, 09:56 PM
also search the SHS site for this type of stuff, so many posts about it and all so different....

girls get up sometime, way before me... and i have no idea what they do. playing? eating? i don't know. then around 9 dh gets up and makes official breakfast, ie. hot food, and then I get up when he finally yells loud enough to break through...or sometimes the coffee smell wakes me. Then we converge in the kitchen, the girls eat and then the grownups eat and then it is 10 30, so i say, we're starting school soon... and they run off. then i get distracted and then they get hungry and then they eat and then i realize that it is so late that we really need to do something, so i find the easy stuff and say, "here take this and do this for 15 minutes".... usually handwriting or phonics, generally i let them choose, and then they get to pick something else to work on.. depends on my mood what i offer them. RightStart math or Moving beyond the page, and usually not both.... because we get distracted....

oh we have starfall.com and have spent entire days with several brainpop trials.....

been thinking about a trampoline, girls have a blog but aren't interested, they play play play play play play play... and it makes no sense to me, but they do it.... I would be completing workbooks left and right... but they don't get that same satisfaction out of them...... so play.

And then we eat dinner around 5:30 or six, and then read alouds. and bed at 7:30 to 8:30....

Sort of boring with all that playing. But they find stuff to do, they keep busy.

Faygo
12-09-2011, 04:13 AM
I LOVE IT! My 7yo will go crazy when he sees it! He could talk about Mario for hours ;) He loves to find the Mario games on Scratch and Kodu and play them. If I could build a curriculum around Mario (hey, maybe I should?) then we'd be in business! Hmmm....now you've got me thinking! :)


Sure :) It isn't very intellectual though! It's a Mario blog :)

I like the use of blogs for LA.

Even though this is about Mario, ds does research, he types, he works on spelling, he uses multiple computer functions etc...so the work that goes into it I'm happy to call 'educational' even though the content isn't.

http://allaboutmario-mamamia.blogspot.com

Gabriela
12-09-2011, 09:54 AM
Stella, do you edit what he writes? I'm trying to figure out where my son should be in his writing, because we don't have any other English speakers to use as reference.

lynne
12-09-2011, 07:20 PM
My 10 yo wakes up early so I like to set things up for him so he can get an early start and get things out of the way if he wants. But a typical day - he starts at around 9 and works up until 11:30 or so and then takes a break, eats lunch at around noon and then does about another hour or so of school work. He does handwriting, spelling, math and LA in the morning and usually science/social studies in the afternoon.

My 6 yo wakes up late, 9-9:30 and starts school at around 10:30 and is usually finished by noon. He does handwriting, spelling, a grammar worksheet, math, MBTP and we read together every morning, taking turns reading aloud. He usually practices piano for 15 minutes or so too.

That's a typical day for us and of course some days are longer depending on what we're doing.

LAR
12-10-2011, 11:39 AM
We have a 6 year old in 1st grade and an 8 year in 3rd. The basics are covered every day, M-F: reading comprehension, 30 minute reading, math, spelling, grammar. Science, history, map work/geography, poetry, mythology, cursive writing, typing and animal study we try for 2 lessons a week, but usually accept 1. A total of 3 hours a day. Dance class twice a week/ acting class is supposed to be Saturday mornings but with the holidays we haven't gone in forever. On field trip days we try to get in most of the basics. I'm trying to ease up and stop being such a tyrant about completing everything. And since the girls play so well together, I leave plenty of creative play time too.

Stella M
12-10-2011, 04:52 PM
Stella, do you edit what he writes? I'm trying to figure out where my son should be in his writing, because we don't have any other English speakers to use as reference.

He uses spell check to edit his own spelling, which is idiosyncratic. And then I help him fix up stuff spell check doesn't catch.

Sometimes he narrates, I type.

So yes, it is edited for spelling/punctuation. None for content/style.

I would say he is 'behind' what an average 7 year old would be writing as far as mechanics goes, mainly because I don't push handwriting for boys early and also because we will stick with oral narrations until he is 10 or 11, but he has good expression and communicates information well ( which is what oral narration is meant to develop ) so for me, his "writing' is going really well. I don't know if I would use him as a point of comparison though.

Cafdog
12-13-2011, 04:17 PM
We never quite seem to have a "typical" day, but this is pretty close:

8am-ish - drag kid out of bed, make her some breakfast
8:30 - begin day with math and spelling to "wake up". She does independent work while I sneak in a workout.
10 am break for snack/recess/errands
10:30 - Social studies (some days)
11:30ish - lunch
Afternoons are her more independent subjects - literature, science, reading comprehension, grammar, etc.

Two days a week we have to leave the house by 2:30 for our 1.5 hour commute for her fencing lessons (and early Saturday mornings). We do her literature discussion questions in the car, and then she fences for several hours in the evening. We don't get home until after 9 pm. Ugh. Other afternoons she has friends over to play when they get out of school at 3pm. She has a set curriculum and a general schedule of work due for submission to Laurel Springs School, so we stick pretty close to her syllabus schedule. I sometimes wish for a more "unschooled" life, but this suits her personality better.

Lou
12-14-2011, 11:23 AM
We TYPICALLY spend 9-11am on block lessons. (ie: December it's phonics/reading January it will be science or math, still deciding) then the rest of the day we cover other subjects thru a more relaxed schooling style. IE: Conversations, story time with math stories, nature hikes talking about science, sometimes the kids want to write about things in their journals, write letters to friends, play computer games on Time 4 Learning or Starfall, help with cooking, marketing, household chores, etc. I also enjoy strewing, so the kids find things to work on (on their own, in their own time)

I only count attendance on the days we do block lessons (aim for M-F) even though the kids are learning all day every day.

I like the block lesson style, because it seems my kids need the down time to process the lessons and then when we come back to that 'subject' something has clicked and they seem to 'get it' and move forward. I like block lessons because it's less transitions (which is when I loose them) And I only really have to PLAN for one subject each month.

My state requires 3 to 4 days a week when broken down over a year. I aim for 5 days a week, so we can take days off when things come up, or kids are having a tough time. My goals are to keep school FUN and accomplish the 'requirements' without emotional stress to our family. So far so good.

opheliag
12-23-2011, 02:15 PM
Our days are pretty flexible but if everything goes exactly as planned, they look a bit like this:

9 - Husband leaves for work, everyone gets dressed, makes beds, etc. Oldest son starts independent work like reading, grammar, and spelling.
10ish - I sit the little ones down to start their handwriting. While one is working on handwriting, the other one works on reading. Then, we switch.
We convene together for history or science (depends on day) and some poetry work. My oldest is learning about poetry and trying his hand at writing it. The younger ones like to hear the poems, and we discuss them together. On Fridays, this time is last, and we do music and art.
Next up is Math. The oldest one works independently while I go through oral stuff with the younger two. They count, practice calendar stuff, practice telling time, count money and addition facts together. My 7yo daughter works on xtramath.com while my 5yo son completes his math worksheet. Then, he is done, and my daughter does her worksheet.
We eat lunch.
I check my oldest son's work and sit down with him to answer questions and discuss his lessons. The other two play during this time.
And we are done.
They usually spend the rest of the day on their bikes or in the pool.
We eat dinner around 6:30 or 7, and they are in bed around 8:30 or 9.

We are usually done by 2pm every day. On Mondays, my oldest son has a science co-op. It is too far for me to come home, so my other two play with friends during this time. That means school is either not done on Mondays or it is just basics (math, reading, writing) and done late. Tuesdays are park days in the afternoons, so we try to get done early. We do school 5 days a week.

J&C'sMommy
12-28-2011, 10:56 AM
My son is in k-1. We start at 10 or 11 and are usually done by 12 or 1. We change the order of things but our subjects are math, language arts, spelling, science, reading (he has to read out loud for 30mins). He has swimming 1x a week and an outside science class 1-2x a week.

crunchynerd
03-04-2012, 08:59 PM
We are so loosey-goosey. Mine are 7, 4, and 1, so we are just beginning beginners. :p We have breakfast, and depending on which day of the week it is, either pack up snacks and diapers and get the 4 yo to his 2-hour, twice-a-week morning preschool/playschool, on one of those two days, we also grocery shop while he is in preschool (again, two hours of mostly unstructured play with a bit of circle time, etc). Twice a week my 7 yo has activities also. Between all that, every meal and snack has to be made from scratch, and I do mean SCRATCH, because of multiple food allergies for all 3 kids.

Sometimes, if we got the evening cleanup done, and have an unbusy morning, the 7 yo does some writing or reading or some such, at the kitchen table after we clear it and get the dishwasher going, while 4 yo is playing Cool Math Games or Clever Dragons and I nurse the 1 yo. Sometimes, nothing of a "you must do this exercise" gets done or even suggested, all day. Almost always, any time we are in the car, the 7 yo reads street signs and such, asks me questions about what she sees, and we get into deep conversation about everything under the sun.

Given my druthers, I prefer mornings at home, to cook, do the chores, and have some lesson time to keep DD moving forward in her education, and have afternoons free for play, visiting with people, etc. I like and need a certain amount of zone-out time each day, and so does my DD (lots!) so that's usually when DS gets his allotted TV time, so DD and I can have quiet time to think, do computer, so she can do art projects, etc.

We have snacks at 10 and 3, breakfast at 6 or 7, lunch at 11 or 12, dinner at 5 or 6, depending. They play outside in the snow, or bike in summer, with the two neighbor kids, who are sometimes prone to saying negative things to my kids, about being homeschooled, but never enough for us to want to just end the fact that they can play together on our street. That would be giving up something really precious. It doesn't have to be perfect, to be good enough.

I usually get dinner underway, if I didn't prepare everything in a mad morning flurry of cooking while all the kids are still cheerful and undemanding, at 3 to 4, so it will be ready for 5, and meanwhile, I delegate the pick-up-put-away to the kids, to get the living and dining room tidy and ready for a dustmop sweep. We have dinner, somewhere in there Papa comes home and joins us, and then it's clearing places, loading dishwasher, brushing teeth, combing and braiding hair, and last-minute playing, before hustling off to bed for more reading and snuggles, sometimes lullabies, and usually by half past 8, the kids are out, sometimes right at 8.

Laundry tends to collect in the basket because I hate putting it away, and could happily keep paring down wardrobes to 2 outfits each, and then stop caring if all both were on the floor when not being worn, or if they ever make it to a bureau. But on Mondays, I try to make a cheerful new-week start and get that laundry pile put away before it walks off.

My DD puts away her own laundry, and DS is coming along in putting his own away. My evil plan is to eventually not have to put anyone's laundry away but my own.

The learning is coming along well despite this on-and-off treatment. My DD just keeps on growing whether I am watching her or not, and I did correct the way she held her pencil, and did insist she learn stroke order for lettering, and do help her learn to write them properly and not backward, but we don't do it every day, and if she wants to do an intensive art project for 2 hours one day, that's fine, unless we have somewhere to be, so long as chores also get done too.

Sometimes I push them and myself to exercise, and I like to put music that gets me going, on in the afternoon and dance up a sweat with the kids. It really lifts our spirits.

crunchynerd
03-04-2012, 09:10 PM
We are so loosey-goosey. Mine are 7, 4, and 1, so we are just beginning beginners. Breakfast, cleanup, sometimes kitchen table lessons for DD (practicing writing, or reading aloud, etc), sometimes not. Sometimes she works for hours on a project she likes, and I veg on the computer. Sometimes we have to hustle out the door to get DS (4) to preschool from 8-10, two mornings a week.

Since we have to get DS to preschool and back twice a week, go grocery shopping one of those mornings, take DD to ballet twice a week, and occasionally see friends, we feel pretty much full, for a weekly schedule, because it all takes a lot of cooking and packing due to food allergies.

I like to have the kids do a pick-up and sweep in the living/dining rooms just before dinnertime, and they help set the table. Then it's clear the table, brush teeth, bathroom, storytime, and bedtime.

We do a lot of talking about things intensively in the car, when driving. The kids also enjoy Cool Math Games, and some other nice computer stuff, and we have TV time here and there, some days none, some days a lot more than I am proud of. They also go out and play in the snow with the neighbor kids, or in summer, ride bikes on our street with them. In Summer I try to get us to the playgrounds and parks often.

As she gets older, though, DD is finding it harder to find other girls her age who are nice, and approachable. She got burned by a 4 year old, because she was being a nice older girl, and offered to play with the 4 year old, and got totally snubbed! She was shocked, and so was I. That is a separate ball of wax, though.

crunchynerd
03-04-2012, 09:52 PM
I seem to be having problems with editing, and cannot even seem to delete properly.

Herbgardens
03-28-2012, 10:11 PM
We change tactics as the year progresses. Now we are entering the Science phase. This means that the end of school is almost here (I believe we are finishing up May 11 this year) and we get to do much more easy going work. We start the year with a tight regiment, and work really hard to get most of our stuff finished by Feb. Bookwork I mean. Then, as the weather improves we get creative and do much more life skills/intellectual conversation and debate, like I said, now we are doing our major science push-microscope work, pond science, plant science..
My Junior is still working through the 100 banned books list, and researching where he wants to go to college. My Sophomore is still guitar crazy and just beginning to feel frustrated at his lack of scheduling himself. (works ever time :-) ) and the three younger kids are just reading, building, coloring and being young kids for the most part.
We switched to a lot of audio learning now as well. History on CD, our Latin is on DVD so chants are in the background quite often, music, all that stuff.
Our school year has a rhythm just like the year has one..It's always been that way so we all are used to.

Warmly,

Amy J