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Jackielyn
11-30-2011, 12:42 AM
So we are switching up our curriculum choices...they are definitely more challenging but not out of his range of knowledge. But he is missing some of the simplest of things...missing a subtraction or addition problem by one, confusing simple words in text hence throwing off the entire phrase and he just throws up his hands up and says ,"this makes no sense!" plus he is super distracted today...

I feel like I did him a disservice with his previous curriculum (time4learning). I have him doing math mammoth and reading eggpress. (reading eggs for older students) . But it's like he lacks critical thinking skills...which he is actually a really smart kid. I am going to stick this out and hopefully with more practice his fluency will get better. Has this happened to anyone else...is there anything I can do to help him?

dbmamaz
11-30-2011, 10:48 AM
My 8 yo makes a lot of silly mistakes too . . . but some days are worse than others. I think they dont have to get every single thing right, we all make mistakes . . . but otoh we did 2 years of T4L too! lol

Batgirl
11-30-2011, 12:24 PM
That's funny, I am using T4L and Math Mammoth together with my oldest. I find they reinforce each other pretty well. I have to monitor him though, otherwise he'll go through as much work as he can with as little effort as he can, resulting in a lot of silly mistakes!

theWeedyRoad
11-30-2011, 01:42 PM
With my kids (and with me) sometimes it takes time to get used to a new presentation. The information might be simple, or seem obvious, but brain space is taken up just trying to adjust.

Here's an example: dd has been doing great with subtraction since last spring. This school year, she had no problem with any of the review (and got a 100 on her math test). We moved on to borrowing and carrying... she gets the idea just fine. But at first she was miscounting her subtraction (if she was counting on her fingers, she's start with the number she was supposed to add or subtract instead of one number higher or lower. Same with manipulatives) even though that should have been the most obvious part of the entire thing! Reading is similar... if I add a new sound, there is a good chance she will get that 100% but then struggle with something she knows well (like short vowel sounds... one of the very first things we covered).

I don't know the scientific explanation ;) but with my kids, I liken it to a cup filled to the top. When something changes a bit or is added, that goes into the cup just fine, but something else drips over the edge. Once the new information is known automatically, everything settles back down and the mistakes stop. I'm sure that applies to something looking VISUALLY different as well.

Marmalade
11-30-2011, 02:39 PM
Both my 10 year old and I get really flustered when we can't solve a math problem. I can relate to the situation pretty well. For me, I know that I can do the problem if I could just "see" it..and I wonder if that is what my daughter is going through as well. I try to take the problem that she is working on and make it as real-life as possible. I don't really care what 25 take away 17 is...but I do care that I have 25 dollars and spent 17 of them on a new CD (I'm old-I buy CDs) and now I need to know how much I have left.

We now use Math Mammoth and I don't try to set a pace-sure-it would be nice if she finished one lesson a day but that might not be possible becuase we are visualizing each problem.

My advice would be to assure him that it is OK if he gets a problem wrong, go through it step by step and try to go at his pace and not at the pace of the curriculum. Meaning-if he only gets one math problem done in a day but you've discussed the hello out of it-don't fret.

Jackielyn
11-30-2011, 05:40 PM
Thanks :) I don't usually get all uptight about stuff...just a day of change and he was frustrating the heck out of me! lol :)

Gabriela
11-30-2011, 08:49 PM
My 9yo is in the silly mistakes club too.
I'm finding Khan math to be very helpful with that.
With spelling - if it's on paper, it's crap - but it's at least 50% better when he types.
Drives me nuts sometimes, because I know he can do it.

We also (like WR said) get flustered with new formats, and need time to get used to change.

Crabby Lioness
12-01-2011, 01:06 AM
Sounds like my 10yo. Smart child, but a total global thinker. Catches on to "big picture" concepts without being told, but has a total meltdown whenever she has to do anything procedural like borrowing and carrying in math. And let's not talk about long division; it's too painful!

But, according to dh the schoolteacher, it's fairly normal at that age and they do grow out of it.

Jackielyn
12-01-2011, 05:40 AM
Sounds like my 10yo. Smart child, but a total global thinker. Catches on to "big picture" concepts without being told, but has a total meltdown whenever she has to do anything procedural like borrowing and carrying in math. And let's not talk about long division; it's too painful!

But, according to dh the schoolteacher, it's fairly normal at that age and they do grow out of it.

Yes I like that! Very much a global thinker!

dbmamaz
12-01-2011, 10:47 AM
I still remember in school, almost ever problem i ever got wrong on a math test was just a silly error, but i still got mostly great math grades. I think I really didnt understand that other kids didnt make those mistakes. My husband gets really down on americans who think everyone should get an 'a' and therefore the tests are all easy . . . he thinks tests should stretch you, and all be graded on a curve, rather than being just a test that everyone has masteredthe basics.

Airen
12-01-2011, 12:22 PM
Bell curves saved my math illiterate butt in college. We all stunk, so no one failed... DS really needs to be a self starter/learner by algebra, or he's doomed LOL

ercswf
12-03-2011, 12:00 AM
My 9 year old make LOADS of silly mistakes but half of that is because I spent so much time working on some things that when he does his math. Worst things are the constant backwards and upside down numbers. For some reason I could not figure out how the heck the answer to 9-7 was h. It was not an h it was a 4. So we are working on how to write number again for the zillionth time. Just because I can decode is weird errors(9 and 6's are common along side those back wards 3's and a back wards 2 can sometimes look like a 5)

At some point he will out grow them. I am screaming victory on the writing front. Last year when we started homeschooling he would not write more then 4 words. Now he wants to be a professional writer.