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View Full Version : The Books He can Read are Boring!



Stella M
11-29-2011, 08:12 PM
The books he wants to read are too hard :(

Suggestions ?

He can read a Magic Treehouse book without trouble.
He wants to be reading Deltora Quest.

What is there that's in between and good for fluency ?

Gabriela
11-29-2011, 08:44 PM
We're in the same boat. He read 20 Magic TH books this year, but I really want him to read something else.
He's not ready for Narnia yet, and even most of Roald Dahl seem too advanced.
It seems like there's nothing more out there for this particular stage. Nothing worthwhile I've found anyway.
We're about to try Gulliver's Travels (I think that's the title in English, we're reading Sp version). It seems like the right level, we'll see.
Lots of short stories for now, hope we get some good tips here.

AddlepatedMonkeyMama
11-29-2011, 08:44 PM
My kids have enjoyed reading the "Catwings" series by Ursula LeGuin, Usborne Young Reading series, "Stepping Stones" books (easy chapter books by Random House), "Absolutely Lucy" series, Flat Stanley, the first three Boxcar Children books (their interest petered out after that), Ivy+Bean (girly, but my son liked them). I don't know if any of those qualify as exciting. My son loves the Bone and Amulet graphic novels, if you don't mind going that route. I tried to interest him in the Droon books, but no dice so far.

farrarwilliams
11-29-2011, 08:48 PM
I'm going to cringe as I write this, but if he wants to be reading Deltora and isn't quite there... Secrets of Droon. It's Magic Treehouse level, but fantasy. Catwings is a bit harder, but that was another good suggestion.

And I'm totally in agreement about Amulet. I bow at the feet of Kazu Kibuishi as the master of awesomeness. They're the high art of graphic novels for the 7-10 yo crowd.

dbmamaz
11-29-2011, 10:12 PM
LOL i was going to say Droon - but Raven didnt like it. I tried it maybe 6 mo ago? it was too hard for him to read AND he didnt like it. RIght now, he's reading a big book of Dr Seuss classics - like if I ran the zoo. He also seems to be able to read the dragonbreath books himself too. He likes the club penguin choose an adventure books (you be the hero? idk, you choose an answer and it sends you to a page to continue the adventure), and Sonic comic-book style books. Raven's independent reading is still spotty.

lakshmi
11-29-2011, 11:30 PM
DD loved the Catwings books and ate them up! DSS loved droon and ate them up!!! But, she isn't big on chapter books really anyway.. But does love graphic novels but i have no idea what the names of them are. She has just started the Penderwicks the newest version. So we'll see.

Yall are so up on books!!! I read them and forget them. I had completely forgotten about Droon! Marvin Red.... something is another.

farrarwilliams
11-30-2011, 12:03 AM
BalletBoy had a brief love affair with Droon. It didn't last. The only series he's read all of are Stink and The Fog Mound. Oh, and Ivy + Bean, I guess... though some of those I read aloud. I wish he wanted to read Deltora. He's slogging his way through Harry Potter, but it's slow slow for him. Still, he won't stop, so I guess that's something. I told him I wouldn't let him skip ahead and read book four unless he could get through the first one, which I think is actually his driving reason for going on. He really wants to know what happens next.

hockeymom
11-30-2011, 06:39 AM
Stink, Frannie K. Stein, Araminta Spookie...those were all series books that my DS loved when he was at that stage. He wouldn't read Droon or any of the more commons series, but I recall there are several.

Pefa
11-30-2011, 08:18 AM
Cornelia Funke's ghost catcher series. Pippi Longstocking? Hank the cowdog (I'm always suggesting Hank, but mostly I think it's better to listen to because the author does such a great job narrating). Choose your own adventure books are good. I second bone and the amulet, also in the graphic novel vein jellaby (although the second in that series was kinda lame) and the baby mouse series. Some of Roald Dahl's shorter books - the giraffe, the pelly and me or george's marvelous medicine.

Hugo Cabret (thinking of it because we just saw the movie last night) thick book but it's about 2/3 graphic 1/3 text which means you can get a lot of meaning from context. The format drove me crazy, and completely kept B1 from finishing it - we're just not used to using pictures for meaning, but BOO loved it and I appreciated it much more when I slowed down and actually looked at the pictures.

hockeymom
11-30-2011, 08:44 AM
Time Warp Trio! Kind of like MTH but more exciting and "grown up".

dbmamaz
11-30-2011, 09:47 AM
Oh, Stink - i knew there was something Farrar had suggested (and others) and Raven had loved! He didnt like time warp trio that much, tho - he and dh got through maybe 4 books and the last ones i got from the library were returned unread

Accidental Homeschooler
11-30-2011, 12:10 PM
I hate this, in it with my younger dd and remember it well with my older dd. I added books on tape. They can listen to what they can't yet read. I worried with my older dd that this would stop her from reading but it didn't and it did not replace reading, just kept her going while her reading level caught up to her interests. Calvin and Hobbes was also good for this stage for us.

Stella M
11-30-2011, 03:35 PM
Yes, it's funny, I didn't really have this with the girls as they both made the jump from beginner to fluent quite quickly. Although we did have an awful Rainbow Magic phase :)

Thanks everyone, I have a book list to research now...thanks AH for the audio reminder too...

dragonfly
11-30-2011, 06:27 PM
When my son was in his transitional reading period, he loved Manga books.

dbmamaz
11-30-2011, 07:45 PM
Yeah, my older kids also seemed to go from easy readers to magic treehouse to wrinkle in time or harry potter in the space of 1 year, maybe 2? . . . Raven, not so much.

AddlepatedMonkeyMama
11-30-2011, 07:47 PM
Oh, my son like some of the shorter Dick King-Smith books, like Lady Lollipop.

Airen
11-30-2011, 10:27 PM
Stuart Little?? It looks long and intimidating, but my boy loved it. He likes Droon- my library doesn't have Magic Treehouse. Oo- and A to Z Mysteries. I'm debating getting older Hardy Boys or... those twins. Shoot- I use to read all my mom's old ones... Nancy Drew was a sissy. Her gf George never got near enough page time :D

Penguin
12-01-2011, 11:55 AM
Moongobble and Me by Bruce Coville? We have two that DS7 loved. Looks like there are 5. Funny, silly, fantasy, and pretty easy readers, probably just a little bit more than MTH. The same author wrote the Magic Shop series too, which are a only little bit more advanced and also fun.

Do you get any Enid Blyton over there? Secret Seven or Famous Five sort of stuff?

The Wonderful Flight to the Mushroom Planet was one DS also really enjoyed. A little bit harder, and probably more difficult to find, too, but fun if you can. An older book, written before the moon landing, about a trip to a nearby planet.

dragonfly
12-01-2011, 12:47 PM
r... those twins. Shoot- I use to read all my mom's old ones...

The Bobbsey Twins?

naturegirl7
12-01-2011, 08:40 PM
DS fell in love with Droon and Deltora. They both make me cringe! I am glad he is reading but ugh. He is begging to get Goosebumps too. I think they are basically the same reading level but a bit much IMO for him (he's 6).

He also loves Magic School Bus chapter books.
The classic AA Milne Winne the Pooh.
Usborne books - Stories from around the World, Greek Myths, Ghost and Goblins, etc.
Bunnicula and the later books - HUGE hit!! these are a riot.

Pippi Longstocking and anything by Roald Dahl are hits here too. The GaHoole books are his current fave. We do them as bedtime read aloud but he is always reading ahead.

naturegirl7
12-01-2011, 08:50 PM
Anyone read the How To Train Your Dragon series? DS saw them the other day and I think they may be next on our list. Didn't stop to flip thru it so I'm not sure the reading level or quality. He loved the movie though

Lak001
12-01-2011, 10:12 PM
We just did the Pippy Longstocking series, and my daughter loved it. She Just started reading Fantastic Mr. fox by Roald Dahl. She likes that one too. And all four books in the Mrs. Piggle Wiggle series.
The invention of Hugo Cabret was another one of her favorites. We still haven't watched the movie.
Stuart little was just a little too weird for our taste.

Airen
12-02-2011, 01:33 AM
The Bobbsey Twins?

Oo... that sounds familiar. He he he. I just realized all my suggestions might be too dated for your boy... my DS likes mysteries, so we're digging up all my mom's old ones.... the writing then was more... plain? Straightforward might be a better word. Although sometimes I have to explain an older phrase/saying :D

Pefa
12-02-2011, 11:16 AM
Anyone read the How To Train Your Dragon series? DS saw them the other day and I think they may be next on our list. Didn't stop to flip thru it so I'm not sure the reading level or quality. He loved the movie though

books are way better than movie (no surprise) BOO's comment on movie was "leave it to dreamworks to take a kickass girl and turn her into a love object." Books are quick moving and fun.

lynne
12-02-2011, 10:00 PM
I struggle with this. My 6 yo can read just about anything but he doesn't like much fiction. He prefers to read books about tornadoes or Titanic or energy and I haven't been able to find him chapter books that interest him. We always end up getting the non-fiction books with lots of pictures in them. I just wish I could find some simple beginner chapter books that are interesting. He doesn't really like Magic Treehouse, Flat Stanley or any of the other common series books out there. Maybe he's too young for them yet even though his reading ability is there.

My 10 yo would only read Pokemon books for the longest time and now loves lots of different books, Percy Jackson and Harry Potter especially so hopefully my younger one will eventually enjoy reading fiction. Although, my DH still doesn't read fiction and never did.

hockeymom
12-03-2011, 07:11 AM
Lynne, my son was like that until he was 7. It drove me crazy--it was so boring to always be reading about earthquakes and trains and car engines. He still doesn't know any fairy tales or nursery rhymes and very few standard small kid stories because when he was the right age for them, he would insist we read everything about skyscrapers or wind turbines in the middle school section of the library. Bah.

Scholastic puts out some decent small books about sciencey stuff, but much of it might be too simple. They were too easy and small for my DS when I ordered them when he was in K, but it was all I could find through the schools at the time. Still, they might be worth checking out for something a bit more meaty.

How about the Magic School Bus chapter books? DS used to love those at that age. They have the jumbly picture type books and real chapter books, a couple different levels I think. I'm wracking my brain, but I remember having a really hard time at that age too. But those were a big hit.

There may be hope for fiction coming into his life though. DS was 7 when the world of fiction entered his life and he hasn't turned back. The choices all of a sudden become limitless (even without the standard books, which he isn't into either).

Oh! How about the Make your own Adventure series? That should be the right reading level and mixes in some adventure in with the facts. Disclaimer, my son used be fascinated with the Titanic at that age too until he read a MYOA book and his character died--freaked him right out and he's never mentioned the Titanic again. But he's a sensitive type that way, who knows what will get at him. Just thought I should add that in. lol

WindSong
12-03-2011, 08:41 AM
Anyone read the How To Train Your Dragon series? DS saw them the other day and I think they may be next on our list. Didn't stop to flip thru it so I'm not sure the reading level or quality. He loved the movie though

My ds read the series and really enjoyed each book. He said the book is way better than the movie, even though he liked the movie.

WindSong
12-03-2011, 08:51 AM
We just did the Pippy Longstocking series, and my daughter loved it. She Just started reading Fantastic Mr. fox by Roald Dahl. She likes that one too. And all four books in the Mrs. Piggle Wiggle series.
The invention of Hugo Cabret was another one of her favorites. We still haven't watched the movie.
Stuart little was just a little too weird for our taste.

My dd really enjoyed Pippi, too. I read all of the Mrs. Piggle Wiggle books to dd last year. They are her favorite books. We are re-reading them again now and having just as much fun as if we were reading them for the first time!

I wish I had some better suggestions for you , Melissa. But here it goes....when my ds was 7, his favorite books were the Captain Underpants series.

lynne
12-03-2011, 09:46 AM
Lynne, my son was like that until he was 7. It drove me crazy--it was so boring to always be reading about earthquakes and trains and car engines. He still doesn't know any fairy tales or nursery rhymes and very few standard small kid stories because when he was the right age for them, he would insist we read everything about skyscrapers or wind turbines in the middle school section of the library. Bah.

Scholastic puts out some decent small books about sciencey stuff, but much of it might be too simple. They were too easy and small for my DS when I ordered them when he was in K, but it was all I could find through the schools at the time. Still, they might be worth checking out for something a bit more meaty.

How about the Magic School Bus chapter books? DS used to love those at that age. They have the jumbly picture type books and real chapter books, a couple different levels I think. I'm wracking my brain, but I remember having a really hard time at that age too. But those were a big hit.

There may be hope for fiction coming into his life though. DS was 7 when the world of fiction entered his life and he hasn't turned back. The choices all of a sudden become limitless (even without the standard books, which he isn't into either).

Oh! How about the Make your own Adventure series? That should be the right reading level and mixes in some adventure in with the facts. Disclaimer, my son used be fascinated with the Titanic at that age too until he read a MYOA book and his character died--freaked him right out and he's never mentioned the Titanic again. But he's a sensitive type that way, who knows what will get at him. Just thought I should add that in. lol

Thank you. So far he doesn't like the Magic school bus books but the Choose Your Adventure books sound like something he may like. I'm going to get a couple (but not Titanic):). That would upset him too if his character died. If you think of anything else, let me know.

AddlepatedMonkeyMama
12-03-2011, 10:22 AM
Lynne, Usborne Young Reading and Stepping Stones (Random House) both have non-fiction chapter books. Here's a list (http://www.usborne.com/catalogue/catalogue.aspx?cat=1&area=YR&subcat=YRS3) of the Usborne "Series 3" books, which have a bunch of interesting non-fiction books.

lynne
12-03-2011, 10:50 AM
Lynne, Usborne Young Reading and Stepping Stones (Random House) both have non-fiction chapter books. Here's a list (http://www.usborne.com/catalogue/catalogue.aspx?cat=1&area=YR&subcat=YRS3) of the Usborne "Series 3" books, which have a bunch of interesting non-fiction books.

Thanks! I'll try them.

hockeymom
12-03-2011, 11:07 AM
I forgot about Stepping Stones--my DS read a bunch of those as well.

Lak001
12-03-2011, 12:04 PM
My dd really enjoyed Pippi, too. I read all of the Mrs. Piggle Wiggle books to dd last year. They are her favorite books. We are re-reading them again now and having just as much fun as if we were reading them for the first time!

I wish I had some better suggestions for you , Melissa. But here it goes....when my ds was 7, his favorite books were the Captain Underpants series.

We loved Mrs. piggle Wiggle a lot too. My dd would just sit there and laugh while reading the book. It was funny, and captivating. She would finish reading the whole book in a couple of days, and already begging to get the next one in the series. We'll do them again too.

I don't know if there's some books that only boys like, and some only liked by girls. Books like Half Magic, and The Miraculous Journey Of Edward Tulane seemed like it would appeal to both boys and girls of ages 6 and up. I'm not good at selecting classics for my dd. I always take other,s suggestions when it comes to classic literature. If someone here with a good knowledge on classic literature can make an exhaustive list of children's classic literature that would be wonderful.

Stella M
12-07-2011, 04:45 PM
Check out Satori Smiles blog Lak, Angela has a list of good ( including classic ) children's books.

Thanks all for the extra suggestions!

StephSchiff
12-09-2011, 01:25 AM
I struggle with this. My 6 yo can read just about anything but he doesn't like much fiction. He prefers to read books about tornadoes or Titanic or energy and I haven't been able to find him chapter books that interest him. We always end up getting the non-fiction books with lots of pictures in them. I just wish I could find some simple beginner chapter books that are interesting. He doesn't really like Magic Treehouse, Flat Stanley or any of the other common series books out there. Maybe he's too young for them yet even though his reading ability is there.

My 10 yo would only read Pokemon books for the longest time and now loves lots of different books, Percy Jackson and Harry Potter especially so hopefully my younger one will eventually enjoy reading fiction. Although, my DH still doesn't read fiction and never did.

Lynne - there are some great chapter books called "I Survived" with Shark Attacks, the sinking of the Titanic and such. They are good fiction for our morbid boys and open the door to some history and good discussions. My 7 yr old (who likes to read very complex books aloud but has little comprehension when reading himself) likes to take turns reading a chapter together and reading himself. I think they are from Scholastic, but if I can dig one out of the Bermuda Triangle (his room), I will let you know more.

Joe Sherlock (kid detective, available for Kindle and DTB) books are great - a bit tamer than Captain Underpants but silly and obnoxious enough to keep his attention, we've read 5 so far and he loves them.

My son LOVES Mrs. Pigglewiggle. I put the audiobook from Audible on for him, and then he's more comfortable reading it himself later.

Geekling loves reading Robert Louis Stevenson together for some reason. Once we've read some together, he likes to reread them alone and you can download a lot of free Poetry for Kids books for the Kindle or Kindle App.

Flat Stanley is a good one to read together and then let him reread later. There is a little bit of vocab my son struggled with, but he enjoyed the books.

The Max Axiom "comic books" are wonderful if he's into Science, I think we own them all at this point.