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View Full Version : ever want to tell your kids not to sound *too* much like they are homeschooled?



CatInTheSun
11-16-2011, 02:23 PM
For a rank promotion in their martial arts (MA) they have to answer the question, "What does this MA mean to you?" -- one of those icky "no wrong answers" kind of questions.

My 8yo dd is like me and doesn't like those types of questions. So I gave examples from the teacher (exercise, learn new things, play with others) and she said, "It gives me a chance to learn and play with other kids."

Fine answer, but UGH maybe a little *too* homeschool-stereotype-ish? <sigh> I suggested she tweak that and reminded her that the reason they don't have lots of friends here is we just moved here last year, but had lots back in CO.

On one hand I felt like I should just let her answer how she wanted, but I knew it wasn't her TRUE answer, just piecing together from what I was saying to form AN answer. I probably shouldn't FEEL like we have to be poster family for homeschooling in general, but we're the only hs family there and the MA instructor was a ps teacher, so...

I didn't mind having the only kids dancing across the street at a Greek festival, and I really need to keep on trying to find a hs group around here (can't get a response from the leaders)...anyone else ever feel a twinge when their kids let their hs freak flags fly? :D And yeah, I know we hs because we're weird, not the other way around. LOL

Stella M
11-16-2011, 06:36 PM
A twinge, yes :)

Tayonoss
11-16-2011, 06:54 PM
YEP! My dd2 (8 years old) told our librian we homeschool the kids cause "were just too good for the schools here", I didnt know if I wanted to sink in to the floor or correct her.

My dh says were weird and proud of it and the world can like us or leave us alone. He is happy being thought of as "those weird homeschool people who live up the road".

dbmamaz
11-16-2011, 08:48 PM
Often when I feel that way about something my kids say, in retrospect i think i'm overreacting because i feel judged . . . is it really wrong? No . . .

MrsLOLcat
11-16-2011, 09:31 PM
Nah... my son would "sound homeschooled" even if he wasn't. That's one Aspie trait that'll do it every time.

Night Owl
11-20-2011, 06:39 PM
My son doesn't so much sound home schooled as he sometimes looks it. You know, wearing rubber boots on a sunny day because we stopped by the state park to look for frogs on the way to the library. For a long time he had long hair down to his shoulders and tends to wear tie dyed tee shirts with his camouflage shorts. He definitely looks like the stereotypical crunchy, home schooled, secular kid, at least around here. I tend toward the crunchy look myself when I am not at work so there are days I feel like we are carrying a sign.

Christy
12-18-2011, 10:34 PM
There are lots of days, when I wish they didn't sound quite so homeschooled. They say odd things... I love their craziness, but I'm self-conscious still. And my kids make it worse by asking me to translate things for other people, when other people stare at them with obvious confusion as to what they said. My six year old will want me to explain his nutrino-walked-into-a-bar joke... or to explain how they just made a joke refering to some Greek god or some other obscure historical, scientific or literary reference others don't know.

There was one day we were going into a store and my oldest told me he wanted us to pretend we were other people. He didn't specify who we were pretending to be, just "normal people." He went through and listed what we weren't allowed to talk about and said he'd pretend to be interested in things he thought other six year olds would be interested (in that case transformers. He's since read a lot of transformer cartoons, which lets him play easier with some of his friends). It was pretty cute. I wasn't sure before then if he was aware that we are weird or not.

CatInTheSun
12-18-2011, 11:04 PM
There are lots of days, when I wish they didn't sound quite so homeschooled. They say odd things... I love their craziness, but I'm self-conscious still. And my kids make it worse by asking me to translate things for other people, when other people stare at them with obvious confusion as to what they said. My six year old will want me to explain his nutrino-walked-into-a-bar joke... or to explain how they just made a joke refering to some Greek god or some other obscure historical, scientific or literary reference others don't know.

There was one day we were going into a store and my oldest told me he wanted us to pretend we were other people. He didn't specify who we were pretending to be, just "normal people." He went through and listed what we weren't allowed to talk about and said he'd pretend to be interested in things he thought other six year olds would be interested (in that case transformers. He's since read a lot of transformer cartoons, which lets him play easier with some of his friends). It was pretty cute. I wasn't sure before then if he was aware that we are weird or not.

<wince> The first joke I ever told in K started, "How do you excite an atom?" Let's just say no one got it. :wasntme: I guess proof you can be weird even in ps. MOST of the time I'm glad they don't feel like they have to "fit in".