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kristinabrooke
09-29-2011, 11:28 PM
We read a alot! We are also incorporating audiobooks as we cancelled cable (saving $111 dollars). My question is about what to do after.

When I taught 9th grade I did read alouds and had the students create mini summary books after. It was great for reinforcing major themes and a great way to check to see if they understood what was being read.

So, what about for a 5 year old who is on the cusp of reading. Should I do something after each chapter? Book? Every other book?

We are about to finish Charlie and the Chocolate Factory- 3 chapters left. I was going to have her choose her favorite room and then reread that chapter and have her draw a picture representing that room...

How does that sound? Any other ideas?

ETA: Do you think it is even necessary to do anything other than discuss the book?

TIA!
Kristina

Pilgrim
09-29-2011, 11:43 PM
Like Peak with Books and FIAR, you could do a host of things to help strenghten understanding. Drawing is one. Others might include looking up fun info on related topics (how is chocolate made? what's the largest candy bar ever?), science (making treats), and math (using Hershey bar squares). I like the idea of revisiting her favorite room. How about using graph paper to draw a map of the factory? My boy really enjoyed the various activities with Peak with Books.

Have fun!

kristinabrooke
09-30-2011, 12:13 AM
Like Peak with Books and FIAR, you could do a host of things to help strenghten understanding. Drawing is one. Others might include looking up fun info on related topics (how is chocolate made? what's the largest candy bar ever?), science (making treats), and math (using Hershey bar squares). I like the idea of revisiting her favorite room. How about using graph paper to draw a map of the factory? My boy really enjoyed the various activities with Peak with Books.

Have fun!


Thank you! I realized that I forgot to post the most important part of my question! LOL. I started this thread to ask if it was necessary to actually do anything at all other than talk about it with her. I don't want to overload her too much and I think that talking about books is a great way to teach her to think about books, but the classroom teacher in me wants to have her "do" something on paper as well.

Stella M
09-30-2011, 01:33 AM
No! Just enjoy :) Discuss, for sure. And if it occasionally takes your fancy, do something special that is book related. But don't kill the read-aloud with a whole stack of 'activities'. Imo :)

But I'm saying that from a pov where read-alouds ( for pleasure ) are different to books we read for narrations ( for school ). So I guess it depends. Are these read-alouds meant to be part of other subjects ?

Beverly
09-30-2011, 01:46 AM
I sometimes have my daughter draw a picture while I read and have her tell me about the picture afterward - if I am feeling ambitious, I will write down what she says. If we are reading non-fiction, I ask her to remember two or three things she found out from the text. (Mercury is the first planet, Venus is covered with poisonous gas). Acting silly and pretending to be characters from books is fun (I'll be Ramona and she will be Bezus or Mrs. Quimby). My daughter thinks it is fun when I remember story events out of order and she gets to correct me.

I wouldn't do an exercise for every book (at least not picture books! Yikes!), but certainly a few for nice long chapter book or books that tie into other things you are focused on. I think I remember reading that you are focusing on prehistory this year, so if you were reading something like Big Bang! The Tongue-Tickling Tale of a Speck That Became Spectacular (http://curledupkids.com/bigbang.htm), it might be fun to come up with rhymes or the project I didn't do with my kids (oil pastels used to draw an explosion covered in a black watercolor wash and sprinkled with glitter) because I was too wiped out that day.

Aside: We are cramming pre-history into the beginning of the year and still hope to get to the fall of Rome though, so I refuse to feel guilty for not doing every project I think of. We did the oil pastel/watercolor thing for trilobites on the bottom of the ocean in the paleozoic era, so that art concept got covered anyway. And I avoided the use of glitter!

(BTW - love your new avatar!)

farrarwilliams
09-30-2011, 08:14 AM
Yep. Just read and enjoy. There's a book called Deconstructing Penguins that some people like for introducing literary analysis to young kids, but even if you wanted to do something like that, I would still just bring it up in conversation about the book, especially at this age. If you wanted to do something more formal, I would do art activities or extensions like Five in a Row suggests.

I like your new avatar, Kristina!

WindSong
09-30-2011, 09:52 AM
We read aloud mostly just for fun. We definitely talk about the book. I agree with Melissa that doing too many activities may take away from the joy of the read-aloud experience. I would save those for school reading. However, one activity that we enjoy is seeing the movie AFTER we have read the book and noting the differences. My dd and I just finished the Secret Garden and watched the 1993 movie. She really enjoyed that. We are almost finished with The Wizard of Oz. So we plan on watching the movie this weekend. On a side note, I must say that the book shocked me. The book is sooo different from the movie. I grew up watching the movie and always thought that was *it. I never even knew it was based on a book until I was adult. And I just read the book for the first time to dd. What an eye-opener for me.

Has your dd ever seen the original Charlie and the Chocolate Factory movie? The original one was my favorite. Didn't care for Tim Burton's version.

That is a beautiful picture of you and your dd!

WindSong
09-30-2011, 09:57 AM
I just realized that your dd is 5. My son watched Charlie and the Cocolate Factory when he was five and he didn't like it. He was afraid of all the squirrels that carried Veruca away and dumped her down the bad nut chute. He also thought the boat ride in the beginning was scary. So I guess it depends on your child. My ds to this day doesn't like anything spooky or scary.

farrarwilliams
09-30-2011, 10:47 AM
It's true... both versions of the Charlie and the Chocolate Factory movie are disturbing in various ways. But... eh. I would have let my kids try it. I didn't see the Gene Wilder version until I was around 10 yo and by then I think it was too late for me not to be completely freaked out by it, if that makes any sense. If I'd seen it at age 5, it probably would have seemed more normal.

kristinabrooke
09-30-2011, 11:44 AM
Thank you all for the response and filling my head with compliments of my new photo! My ego really thanks you!

We are reading for fun mostly and I have not really chosen books that tie into our curriculum ( I mean we have books that do that, but i was referring to the "for fun" books). At the same time, I love the ide of doing art projects, making up games, and watching clips from the movies to go along with some of them although I am not a fan of the Charlie and the Chocolate Factory movies. She saw Tim Burton's Alice in Wonderland and loved it so I think she may actually like the C&CF movies but I may only show her clips. I agree that we can bypass the formal stuff for now.

Incidentally, we were at the Farmers Market today and when I told her not to touch anything (she has nut allergies and we were in the nut section) she replied, "I'm listen. Not like that Verooca!" So, she's paying attention. LOL.

SusanC
09-30-2011, 03:07 PM
So much depends on everyone's personality! *I* am not good about thinking of a project, setting it up, getting everybody excited to do it, and then finishing - any one of those steps can be a deal-breaker for me, so I try to be choosy about committing to things like that. My *son* will say, "Do I have to do this?" in a pleasant, voice that means "I will do it if I must, but it will be minimal". My *daughter* will happily buzz away, if there is any artistic component, but may not finish for a day or two. But we ALL like read-alouds, so for us, we generally just read and enjoy and go to bed. :D

I would like to watch some movies with them, but even plain-old suspense gets them so nervous it is not enjoyable. They will eventually grow out of that I suppose.

Stella M
09-30-2011, 06:22 PM
My girls didn't get into movies until relatively 'old'. It's OK :)

The dolls at the beginning of the Johnny Depp Charlie and the Chocolate Factory movie ? Oh my freaking goodness, we all ran screaming from the room...

WindSong
09-30-2011, 06:30 PM
The dolls at the beginning of the Johnny Depp Charlie and the Chocolate Factory movie ? Oh my freaking goodness, we all ran screaming from the room...

:eek: Exactly. I couldn't take it and had to turn it off!

kristinabrooke
10-01-2011, 09:38 PM
So I decided to just read. We finished Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and talk about it and about why Charlie was the "chosen one." And lo' and behold, she decided to draw a picture of Charlie, Mr. Wonka, and Grandpa Jo in the elevator!

LovingMyChildren
10-01-2011, 10:22 PM
My DD5 loves art and would do art all day everyday if I let her. So, anytime I give her free art time (which is daily), she tends to go about doing something from a recent book we read or from some topic that day we talked about or read about. I don't have to plan a thing! It seem Mya is the same :)

As far as books v. movies - I'm sure you've all read the Wizard of Oz new-quels. I just made up that word by the way :o - it's not a sequel, it's not exactly a prequel. It's completely new fiction stuff about the years leading up to the Wizard of Oz book. The author is Gregory Maguire - he wrote Wicked about the life and times of the Wicked Witch of the West, then another about the Lion, and two more also regarding the Oz world. He's quite an author and each book has it's own tone. I hated seeing the musical after reading his book btw. But, also, more relevant is his series of books for children that often, though not all of them, are retakes of classics.

lakshmi
10-02-2011, 12:55 AM
I'd say, the activity for finishing a book is... read another book. When both my girls were littler I would have them draw while I read. On blank paper. At the time it was when I would bring the markers out. LOL...

It seems like the drawing during read-aloud sort of helped them to focus on the books. No extra activities needed.

WindSong
10-02-2011, 07:46 AM
So I decided to just read. We finished Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and talk about it and about why Charlie was the "chosen one." And lo' and behold, she decided to draw a picture of Charlie, Mr. Wonka, and Grandpa Jo in the elevator!

That's wonderful! It sounds like she really enjoyed the book.

notebookmom
10-03-2011, 12:48 AM
My 5 1/2 year old likes to make a drawing or painting to illustrate a story or chapter. She draws the pictures in blank (unruled) spiral notebooks and we paste the paintings into the notebooks. I label the story or chapter name. When my husband gets home from work, she likes to show him the pictures and retell the stories. Some kids don't enjoy drawing so much, but it's worked well for us.

We've been doing Aesop's Fables with those composition books where you draw a picture on top and write in lined area below. I write out the moral of the fable with dots. Then she draws a picture of the story and practices writing her letters over my dot outlines.

We also do Five in a Row (though not every week), which has been fun, but she does not enjoy hearing the same story day after day. I've started finding supplemental stories to read that relate to the main story. We keep a notebook for FIAR that she pastes things into, practices writing, and draws pictures. Lots of people lapbook for it.

WallFlower
10-03-2011, 01:38 AM
We don't usually do anything formal after a read aloud. We might talk about it for a bit. Or sometimes we make connections to another story or something that happened to us. (Like I might say, "This reminds me of another story we've read" and see if they can guess).

We also have a binder of "values" that we add to sometimes. Like if the character does something caring, I will write a sentence about it in our binder under "caring". Honestly, the kids aren't really that into this, but it sounded like a good idea when I was planning the year. ;)

PetVet
10-03-2011, 12:49 PM
We compare and contrast the book vs the movie here as well.

Our primary curriculum, MBtP, is literature based, but for our fun family reading we've done Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, the first Harry Potter, the first Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Stuart Little, Soul Surfer and are starting into the first Percy Jackson now. DS reads a lot on his own, but we both enjoy reading a book together and then watching the movie - popcorn! :)

Punchie
10-09-2011, 01:05 PM
We don't do anything special after finishing a book other than to start the next one. :) I'm just thrilled that DD will sit down and listen to a chapter book. She fidgets while I read, but she's a kid who generally moves non-stop throughout the day. We're reading Dealing With Dragons at the moment. Next up is either Charlie and the Chocolate Factory or Bunnicula.

Teri
10-09-2011, 11:32 PM
We also use MBTP, so we do a LOT of literature. The books they read on their own, however, we don't do anything extra. I want them to be able to read anything they want without worrying about an assignment coming at the end. My kids tend to do things on their own. They talk about the books they are reading to each other and often read the book that a sibling has finished (or at the same time if it is on the kindle app.)They draw pictures, act out the story, assume the roles, compare the book to other books, ask to see movies (related and based on).
This weekend they discovered The Phantom of the Opera because Libby just finished reading A View from Saturday and one of the characters went to see Phantom in the book. They have absolutely fallen in love with the movie and have watched it twice this weekend.

lakshmi
10-09-2011, 11:41 PM
Is A view from Saturday in the MBTP curric.? We've started chapter book read alouds and the books that I have more than one copy of I use, so that my daughter can follow along. BUT, I won't read this one if it is coming up.

koalaborg
10-12-2011, 12:58 AM
We are using FIAR as part of our curriculum (though with all the other stuff we do I stretch each book over two weeks instead of five days) and I really like the topics suggested. We always find where the book character is located on our map after we read the story. I usually have in mind the topic we will discuss for each reading day, and then after we read, I transition into the discussion and point things out in the book. It doesn't feel so scripted that way.

We also read a lot of the suggested supplemental readings for SOTW and while we don't do any lesson or activity after our reading, I do try to point things out that we may have already learned about in our SOTW book reading. We actually spent a couple of weeks reading and re-reading a book about ancient egyptians and mummies. apparently she found them facinating. we would actually be in bed discussing the order in which the body was wrapped.