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pdxmomto2
05-12-2010, 12:42 AM
Hi, we are brand new to homeschooling and I am trying to decide on a math curriculum. I like math and have always been good at conceptual and higher level math, but I'm not confident in my ability to explain basic math to a young child. My daughter will be six in august and has basic single digit addition and subtraction mastered. I'm leaning toward a program with manipulatives, but also want something rigorous. I am currently considering:

Math-U-See
Right Start Math
Miquon Math w/ Cuisinaire rods
Singapore math

If you use/or have used any of these, I would love to hear your impressions/opinions. Also, are there other programs I should be considering? Thank you for your help.

Leah

Snoopy
05-12-2010, 09:30 AM
I used Math U See for 2 years and switched to Horizons Math 1 in the middle of 1st grade because we ended up never using the manipulatives. It was easier for me to explain the concepts without using the colorful bars that seemed to confuse Noah, even though we're both visual learners. I think that Math U See gave him a good foundation (we did the Primer, Alpha and Beta levels), but we enjoy Horizons much more. I think (and this might sound dumb!) it's because the workbook in in color while the MUS are just black and white and they became very boring to us. With Horizons, I use various manipulatives to explain concepts, objects that we have lying around the house, instead of specific bars that I had to buy.

jennywilliams
05-12-2010, 10:23 AM
We used Miquon for first through third. I like it because it helps kids look at numbers in a bunch of different ways.

camaro
05-13-2010, 10:32 AM
Mitchell and I started with Miquon this year but soon left it behind. Mitchell just couldn't get into using the rods and found the stark black and white pages of the workbooks intimidating. We grabbed some workbooks from Walmart entitled Math Basics which had more color and images which I suppose made it seem more interesting. It helped us get through a very difficult time in Math. We still use the Miquon books for occasional practice. The next school year we'll be trying Singapore.

Wilma
05-13-2010, 08:19 PM
We used MUS. Granted, my kids were older than your dd when we used it and found the lack of explanation on the pages frustrating. They did not like that they either had to ask me, read the TE or rewatch the video to get clarification of a concept. My children also do better with an incremental or spiral approach and MUS is mastery.

We currently use Saxon, but I do not like their programs before 5/4. John Saxon did not write them and they are very teacher intensive.

I would also suggest Horizons. It is from a Christian publisher. It has, or had, the reputation of publishing one year ahead, so, for example, they cover concepts in their 1st grade program that others cover in 2d grade.

Have you looked at Modern Curriculum Press?

dbmamaz
05-17-2010, 10:31 AM
just another thought, fwiw - i have older kids, and we have TONS of legos. I've used singapore (but not consistently) and we have legos to help with the concepts. If you guys have a lot of beads, you coud string them on pipe cleaners. and there's always cheerios or m&ms . . . you can use manipulatives you dont have to buy, is my point. and dont forget - we all end up switching around at least one or two things in the middle of the year when we realize they arent working

Melyssa
05-17-2010, 08:17 PM
We used Calvert math for 1st through 4th grade and it worked so very well for both me and my daughter. It's a bit pricey but for us it was worth it since it worked so perfectly. (She uses Time4Learning math now, also awesome)

schwartzkari
05-17-2010, 08:41 PM
I started using Kumon workbooks when my daughter turned 4 and have been impressed with them. We own the entire set for ages 4-8. The math books are very colorful, have some puzzles and games mixed in and are very repetitive. I also have my daughter use a set of LacerLinks along with the workbook when she is counting. Kumon does offer more advanced workbooks for children who already know some basic addition and subtraction. Before using the Kumon workbooks, we were using Hooked on Phonics math and also some workbooks by FlashKids. She disliked Hooked on Phonics and said she was bored with the FlashKids workbooks.

Closeacademy
05-18-2010, 07:15 AM
Of your choices I have not dipped my toes into MUS. I have heard good things about the program but have not used it. Now my thoughts on how the others worked for us:

Rightstart--we used levels A-C, it is scripted and if you don't read through the scripts you will miss important things. I love the AL Abacus and use it to this day. A lot of the maniplatives really enhance the math. We left it because I don't like working from scripts and my dd doesn't like worksheet based programs.

Miquon--I had all the levels at one point but we really only used the first book. My dd just wasn't into doing experimental math.

Singapore--I have used Earlybird through 4a. I love the way SM teaches things. I add in manipulatives when we need them and I have found ideas within the texts for making our own maniplatives. The only draw back is that there is not enough review work so sometimes the child might get stuck on a concept for months. I use Rod and Staff from behind so that the child can work on review and cement the concepts so that we can continue to move forward.

Different math works well for different children. You may want to look at your teachng style and your child's learning style.

Do you want a script? MUS, Rightstart
Do you want to teach it yourself? Singapore
Do you want your child to teach it to themselves? Miquon
Do you want hands-on? MUS, Rightstart, Miquon
Do you want visual? Singapore, Horizons

Good luck on making your decision.

Snoopy
05-18-2010, 09:04 AM
Do you want a script? MUS, Rightstart
Do you want to teach it yourself? Singapore
Do you want your child to teach it to themselves? Miquon
Do you want hands-on? MUS, Rightstart, Miquon
Do you want visual? Singapore, Horizons



Christy, this is incredibly helpful. I will refer my friends to this :) Thanks!

Closeacademy
05-19-2010, 07:04 AM
You're welcome. There are a lot more math curriculums out there but these were the ones she was looking at.

pandahoneybee
05-19-2010, 08:35 AM
Closeacademy

Singapore--I have used Earlybird through 4a. I love the way SM teaches things. I add in manipulatives when we need them and I have found ideas within the texts for making our own maniplatives. The only draw back is that there is not enough review work so sometimes the child might get stuck on a concept for months. I use Rod and Staff from behind so that the child can work on review and cement the concepts so that we can continue to move forward.

We use Singapore Math and time4learning.com for math, I like the hands on with SM and the visual of the cartoon lessons with T4L.

pdxmomto2
05-21-2010, 07:09 PM
Thank you everyone who has responded with such great info!

nledgerwood
05-25-2010, 12:11 PM
Has anyone tried MEP - maths enhancement program. I've been using it for a year and a half as have a few friends and we love it. Its simple yet of a high standard. The kids love it as the exercises are constantly changing so they don't get bored. it is especially good for kinasthetic learners as (certainly in the early years) there is alot of action . Its also very easy to put your own ideas if you want to. Its free and available on line so you can try it without any cost and see if you like it. The british education system found that the eastern european maths teaching achieved far better results than anywhere else and approached a Hungarian university to create a program for use in British schools. It was first run as a pilot scheme in a small group of secondary schools and because of its success they rolled the program out to the feeder primary schools. Its been going for about 10 years now if I remember rightly. There are lots of homeschoolers using it and there is a very active yahoo group which provides support. Plymouth University in the UK also provides support and happily give out any passwords for protected files. Their website is http://www.cimt.plymouth.ac.uk so check it out. My family loves it.

crazymama
05-25-2010, 03:36 PM
I have another one to throw out there.... McRuffy Press.

FUN!!! Lots of games and manipulatives, very hands on, lightly scripted teacher manual, very easy to use as a grab and go curriculum (no need to spend hours planning the next day/week/month etc).

We are also loving Funtastic Frogs right now with my little kids (getting harder to get your hands on all the books/frogs/etc, but soooo worth it if you can find it all).

MamaB
05-26-2010, 02:08 PM
http://www.sadlier-oxford.com/math/

http://pgcounty.scottforesman.com/

Here is a link to the resources i am planning to use with my son this year. He will be 5 in August but has been doing math for a year now and is quite a bit ahead for his age. Scott Foresman also has a science section which we'll be using for him too. I have used Scott Foresman with my older daughter (10) as well. Their science books are a tad basic for us and so we supplement heavily but it is a good guideline for me as her teacher. The sadlier oxford material can be purchased as a book but I think I'll just print as i go. I have acces to a great color laser printer :)

MamaB
05-26-2010, 02:11 PM
I looked at the Singapore Math books at our local AEA library and didn't like them much. I know it gets a lot of good reviews though. If you are looking for color check out my reply to this original post. I included two links to resources we use. they are free and online. Doesn't get any better :)

Dana
05-26-2010, 10:34 PM
We use Singapore with some additional work from Miquon.
I prefer the Standards edition of Singapore rather than the US edition. It adds in reviews at the end of each chapter. If using Singapore, you can add in Extra Practice books (at same level of difficulty of the workbook). Intensive Practice books are significantly more challenging, and the word problem books are very good. I also would recommend the Home Instructor Guide.

Miquon won't make much sense without the Lab Sheet Annotations. The First Grade Diary is also definitely worth a read for ideas on how to actually implement Miquon. It's the diary of a teacher using Miquon and provides good illustrations of ways to use the worksheets and jumping off points for experimentation.

ck1224
03-20-2011, 03:48 PM
http://www.sadlier-oxford.com/math/

http://pgcounty.scottforesman.com/

Here is a link to the resources i am planning to use with my son this year. He will be 5 in August but has been doing math for a year now and is quite a bit ahead for his age. Scott Foresman also has a science section which we'll be using for him too. I have used Scott Foresman with my older daughter (10) as well. Their science books are a tad basic for us and so we supplement heavily but it is a good guideline for me as her teacher. The sadlier oxford material can be purchased as a book but I think I'll just print as i go. I have acces to a great color laser printer :)

Thanks for the pgcounty.scottforesman.com link for algeb I, Geom, and Alg. II.

Do you know of any links for free higher math textbooks or lessons (trig, precalc, & calc)? I'm a tutor trying to get caught up in my own math skills as well as being able to use websites with my students.

Thanks,
Chuck

davispigeon
02-19-2015, 06:25 PM
The first thing I saw on the McRuffy Press was Diagramming the Scriptures...I guess that's why it's not on the list of curricula here! LOL!

kjandb
02-19-2015, 09:18 PM
We started with Math-U-See when I first started HS'ing my 1st grade daughter, but it really didn't float my boat and I found the way it approached some basic ideas very tedious. I was already using Singapore for my (then) 3rd grader and loved it, so I got the 2nd Kinder Singapore review book and we started with that (and finished pretty quickly) and I'm still using Singapore it for both of them now. I think it's flexible in that it gives instructions for lots of manipulatives, but you're welcome to leave them alone if they don't seem needed for your child. It goes so smoothly and intuitively from lesson to lesson, that often times my girls work chapters ahead without me knowing it and they've mastered the concepts themselves! Hope this helps and good luck with HSing!

Mariam
02-19-2015, 10:53 PM
We tried Math-U-See and we did not like it. Some people love it, but it moved way too slow for us. (A year for learning basic addition. Year 2 is more complicated addition. etc.) And the videos did not work for us either. We watched a sample video and thought it would work, but the speakers spends 20 minutes explaining a concept that Khan Academy spends 5, and KA was more effective. (Also I found MUS on the expensive side for what I was getting.)

We use Mammoth Math and we are very happy with it. It moves through the lesson, and revisits it, but for DS it is a good pace. MM will send you a ton of free samples, so I suggest signing up for them and checking them out. She is one of the more generous publishers with her samples.

We supplement with Khan Academy. DS likes the videos and they explain things in multiple ways. We start each new section with a video to explain the topic before we jump in.

I use other videos from PBS Kids and gaming apps to supplement the math lessons. DS works independently with the videos and games, at his own pace and when he wants.