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Deli76
09-15-2011, 06:41 PM
I have had trouble convincing my hubby. Today was the last straw!
brief history with ps:
kinder: 3 teachers, 2nd one made her so nervous she was peeing every 10-15 min ( my daughter was keeping track of time ) we took her to a doc, pediatrician and finally a psychologist, she was even on a med that was supposed to stop the urgency of urination. the med obviously didnt work because it wasnt her bladder.after chaperoning a zoo field trip...i saw why the teacher made her so nervous. she was the most whiney, irritating, nasty woman! to come and find out, one of the other kids was so nerved by her she was puking before class nearly every day. and she got educator of the week!!! i was appauled!
1st grade: my daughter decided she wanted to give ps another try.awesome year! went with out a hitch. She got my daughter into advanced reading, gifted and talented. She was so attentive. she answered e-mails and any questions. I think i contacted her 2 times the whole school year. thats how well it went.
2nd grade: my daughter told me she had a headache. i asked her if she told the teacher, she said yes, and she said the teacher said " theres nothing i can do about it". i asked if she went to the nurse, she said no. I was ticked. then 2 weeks ago, they called me because she wasnt wearing the dress code. She wore a red dress, white button up under the dress, and the dress had 2 white flowers for pockets. i said you have got to be kidding me! she has been wearing that shirt since kinder, and it is "polo type", the red dress has shorts under it, and youre making a stink about the white flower pockets??? she wore red slacks last week, no one said anything, and the polo shirt she wore yesterday has yellow flowers printed all over it! i continued to tell her it was sick of them to have all the kids look alike and that there was no expression of individuality or personalty. today, i pick up my daughter and she says she has a head ache. i asked her if she told the teacher ...again the teacher said theres nothing i can do about it, i asked my daughter if she went to get water or put her head down on the desk, she said no. i notice my daughter looks a bit flushed, i let her cool off at home for about 10 minutes because of the heat, she still doesnt look too good. i take her temp....its 102!!!! if the teacher had sent her to the nurse my daughter would have been able to come home and rest, take some meds.
I have had it up to here! i dont know how to convince my hubby. i thought it was because the teacher was new....nope, not the case. he seems to think it is. i dont want to have the same probe we had kinder. it stunk. my daughter deserves better. did any of you have trouble convincing your husbands? what did it take to convince them? did any of you just go and pull them out anyway? hes more worried about socialization. as you can see...im just lost!

Accidental Homeschooler
09-15-2011, 06:58 PM
My husband was reluctant at first. But our daughter (bad kindergarten experience) was falling apart and I think I just wore him down. I started by reading from hs books to him. I found research and read that to him. I was afraid if I handed it to him it would get lost on the dining room table so I would read it and say, "Listen to this... This is interesting..." If you can find a hs group in your area maybe that would reassure him about the socialization thing. My dh wasn't sold on hsing until we actually were doing it for a few weeks. It was the change in our daughter that really did it. She was acting out everywhere and to an extreme and it just kept getting worse and worse. For a while I was putting her to bed and then just sitting down and crying. I wasn't trying to use crying as a weapon but it worked that way a bit I think. After she was home a couple weeks it was like having a different child, the one I remembered, very challenging and strong-willed but not angry and aggressive. You could also suggest just trying it and if it doesn't work ps isn't going anywhere. Good luck! I think it took me a couple months to convince my husband.

PBB
09-15-2011, 07:27 PM
The socialization issue is a myth! With hs, you chose with whom your child socialized. It is not "normal" for kids to be with only people the same age. Read everything you can, meet other hs families and talk to your hubby calmly. One thing to remember is that if you decide to hs, it is not a life-time commitment.....you can always go back to school. Btw, the frequent urination is totally anxiety-driven. My son had that issue BEFORE we started to hs. Good luck.

outskirtsofbs
09-16-2011, 12:10 AM
To be truthful, yes, I just pulled DD out of public school without really having DH backing. He was not on board.......and I really didn't give a crap. DD has a hard time standing up for herself and was being bullied. Where we live, socializing (not socialization) is a real pain in the a** because resources are very few and the people are horrendous. He can see that she is thriving academically and still thinks on certain days that she should be put back into ps, but I won't let him and she doesn't want to go back anyway.

Stella M
09-16-2011, 12:53 AM
Framing it as something you are going to try for a short while sometimes helps. Then a short while turns into a longer while and then, meantime, dh is hopefully seeing how much happier everyone is and realises its not so strange after all.

MarkInMD
09-16-2011, 05:18 AM
Here's what I've suggested before (as a guy, maybe I can give some perspective, although I was only reluctant in the sense that I wasn't sure if I could do it well, not if it was the right move -- I knew we had to do it).

Accidental Homeschooler has the right idea in that men like research. (As Tim Allen once said -- not about HS, though -- "Give us figures. Some sort of chart.") You just saying, "The socialization issue is a myth" will not do it. You've gotta cite sources. Show don't tell. Another really great idea that I've absolutely seen work on some reluctant dads is to have them have a hand in choosing curriculum. But you kind of have to be sneaky. Find some alternatives for, say, math or science (something stereotypically "guy"), and have him look at them. "Which one do you think would work best for her?" Give him a say in it. Most of the time we just want to be asked and have our opinions heard.

I only have a few minutes to type this, but if I have other ideas, I'll be happy to share them. Sounds like HS is what everyone needs. What jerky teachers. Good luck!

Staysee34
09-16-2011, 07:12 AM
My situation is a bit different. My ex-husband and I have never seen eye to eye when it comes to our girls. He refuses to believe DD9 has any problems at all. He refused to take part in any therapies. Hell, he doesn't really have much to do with them other than the 4 days a month when they are visiting. But, because he is their father and has the right to be informed, I told him of my decision to home school. He brought up the whole socialization issue which is just ridiculous. We live in a fairly large city. Even in the dead of winter, you can't step out the door without socializing with someone. Anyway, I told him to research homeschooling children with learning differences if he's concerned but I'd made the decision and it's pretty much final. My boyfriend on the other hand is extremely supportive. He has never doubted my ability to teach them. He agrees that PS is not a good option for the kids. He even went so far as to make himself the acting principal which cracked my girls up because he's such a pushover sometimes. I agree with Mark and Accidental on this one. Show him and actively involve him in the decision. Best of Luck!!

kewb22
09-16-2011, 12:32 PM
It took me 2 years to convince dh that this was the path to take. It took research. Lots of research. Research and the fact that by the end of the 2 years ds was showing serious stress levels and sending up big red flags all over the place. I took books out of the library and would read him interesting passages. I would print out articles and studies on homeschooling that addressed his specific concerns. I would leave these things throughout the house. The most effective location to leave reading material was the bathroom.

MarkInMD
09-16-2011, 07:42 PM
Glad to know that I'm fairly typical as a guy when I read these stories of getting the dads on board. :)

Lak001
09-16-2011, 08:50 PM
My husband had a big opposition to HSing our dd, but i went ahead and pulled her out. I had enough of it. But it took a lot of courage to do so. Perhaps one of the bravest things I've ever done in my life( i think I deserve a medal or something, LOL). We had a good start, but things deteriorated between me and my dd, and my husband had to witness my yelling, crying, and all the drama, and had this smirky, "I told you so" reaction. But slowly, and steadily, I found a middle ground with my dd, and let go of lot of expectations, and things started to look positive once again. Husband by now had a neutral stance on HSing. He wasn't supportive, but wasn't discouraging either.
I've stood my ground, and husband is still not very supportive, but he's not saying anything negative, which itself is a huge relief. Now, I'm able to manage the full responsibility of HSing all by my self but I wish my husband was on board with me sometimes.

bcnlvr
09-16-2011, 08:57 PM
No problems with dh. Me boss. Him not.

bcn :)

5amigos
09-16-2011, 08:57 PM
my husband worried about my sanity of course... but i told him i was up for it. i also didn't say "i'm pulling them out forever". i went with the "just one year" approach to just get them back on their feet and build their confidence a little. now he is incredibly supportive, although he does say he wishes i had more alone time. by the time he gets home from work i'm pretty fried. but... i was even before we hs'd... five kids can just do that to you!!! good luck, i hope you can find a middle ground and somehow be on the same page--even if it means just for a "trial" period.

Night Owl
09-16-2011, 10:26 PM
I emailed my husband a list with bullet point out lining the pros and cons to home school, private school and public school.

It was clear private school was a bust our son, he was miserable from bullying and having problems in the class room because of his ADHD. I was volunteering several hours a week at the school, working extra to pay for private school, plus driving 30 minutes each way to the school. Our public school wasn't a viable choice because of class size and the noise level (my son has sensory issues with noises).

In the email; I outlined the curriculum I was going to use; including supplements from the library and community resources. I addressed concerns about social interaction with a plan involving martial arts lessons, art classes, scheduled play dates, playing with neighborhood friends and our son attending an after school program 10 hours a week. I even included weekly goals with a certain number of hours spent with other kids.

I attached several studies about why home schooling was a positive experience and listed all of the home schoolers we knew; including his cousin's children and some close friends with lovely, well adjusted kids. Then I closed with the arguments we could go on vacation whenever we wanted and we could address our son's asynchronous learning without effecting his self esteem.

Three years later, my husband is a strong supporter of home schooling. He does the home schooling one or two days a week when I am at work and has a much stronger relationship with our son.

Deli76
09-16-2011, 11:28 PM
I was looking up stats on home school...all across the board 50th percentile for public school, not very convincing when all subjects for ps are 50. Hs was between 80th and 90th percentile. The variation in hs was believable. the articles seemed a bit biased. I need something more believable. I am breaking him down little by little. LOL. if any of you have a website that may be more believable for him, I would greatly appreciate it. TY

CatInTheSun
09-17-2011, 02:09 AM
I was looking up stats on home school...all across the board 50th percentile for public school, not very convincing when all subjects for ps are 50. Hs was between 80th and 90th percentile. The variation in hs was believable. the articles seemed a bit biased. I need something more believable. I am breaking him down little by little. LOL. if any of you have a website that may be more believable for him, I would greatly appreciate it. TY

The percentiles are set with the ps mean being 50, so yes, ps should be exactly on the 50th percentile. By definition.

Of course, that's statistics. HSing doesn't guarantee your child a better education, that will depend on you. Providing an individualized education without the distractions of ps make that a whole lot easier, though. There are some very thought provoking books, but hopefully someone else can come in with a list of pithy studies.

hreneeh
09-17-2011, 09:29 PM
My husband was most worried about our son getting to be with friends because he's a social butterfly. But when we moved here and my huband saw how awful the schools were he was all for it. Funny thing is after going with me to the co-op (which he insisted on for "socialization") he said, you know he gets plenty of time with his friends on the block. If you don't want to do the co-op don't worry about it. It's amazing how they come around when you get them involved!

Shoe
09-17-2011, 09:32 PM
No problems with dh. Me boss. Him not.

bcn :)

LMAO. Somehow that doesn't surprise me!

Shoe
09-17-2011, 09:36 PM
I have had trouble convincing my hubby. Today was the last straw!
brief history with ps:
kinder: 3 teachers, 2nd one made her so nervous she was peeing every 10-15 min ( my daughter was keeping track of time ) we took her to a doc, pediatrician and finally a psychologist, she was even on a med that was supposed to stop the urgency of urination. the med obviously didnt work because it wasnt her bladder.after chaperoning a zoo field trip...i saw why the teacher made her so nervous. she was the most whiney, irritating, nasty woman! to come and find out, one of the other kids was so nerved by her she was puking before class nearly every day. and she got educator of the week!!! i was appauled!
1st grade: my daughter decided she wanted to give ps another try.awesome year! went with out a hitch. She got my daughter into advanced reading, gifted and talented. She was so attentive. she answered e-mails and any questions. I think i contacted her 2 times the whole school year. thats how well it went.
2nd grade: my daughter told me she had a headache. i asked her if she told the teacher, she said yes, and she said the teacher said " theres nothing i can do about it". i asked if she went to the nurse, she said no. I was ticked. then 2 weeks ago, they called me because she wasnt wearing the dress code. She wore a red dress, white button up under the dress, and the dress had 2 white flowers for pockets. i said you have got to be kidding me! she has been wearing that shirt since kinder, and it is "polo type", the red dress has shorts under it, and youre making a stink about the white flower pockets??? she wore red slacks last week, no one said anything, and the polo shirt she wore yesterday has yellow flowers printed all over it! i continued to tell her it was sick of them to have all the kids look alike and that there was no expression of individuality or personalty. today, i pick up my daughter and she says she has a head ache. i asked her if she told the teacher ...again the teacher said theres nothing i can do about it, i asked my daughter if she went to get water or put her head down on the desk, she said no. i notice my daughter looks a bit flushed, i let her cool off at home for about 10 minutes because of the heat, she still doesnt look too good. i take her temp....its 102!!!! if the teacher had sent her to the nurse my daughter would have been able to come home and rest, take some meds.
I have had it up to here! i dont know how to convince my hubby. i thought it was because the teacher was new....nope, not the case. he seems to think it is. i dont want to have the same probe we had kinder. it stunk. my daughter deserves better. did any of you have trouble convincing your husbands? what did it take to convince them? did any of you just go and pull them out anyway? hes more worried about socialization. as you can see...im just lost!

By the time we decided to pull our kids out of public school (at different times), both of us were well aware of the reasons it seemed beneficial, and all for it. In our case, I (as the husband) had to be up for it, since my wife was working full time in the public school system during the day at the time, so I would be the primary educator. Honestly though, the public school didn't give us much choice-it failed my son academically, and it failed my daughter socially (with bullying). If it wasn't so bad (for us, not knocking public schools in general), we wouldn't have pulled them out.

dbmamaz
09-17-2011, 09:44 PM
BOth my husband and my ex were opposed for a long time, but finally dh caved after HIS son was crying every morning the entire last half of kindergarten because he didnt want to go back. He made me follow the scope and sequence of public school because he was sure i'd crack and want to send them back. But after just a few months, he said it was clearly a big improvement for my son. He still wants HIS son back in public school as soon as MY son graduates.

BTW, there are no good statistics for homeschoolers, really. There are some where homeschoolers volunteer to take standardized tests, but then you have self-selection bias - only parents who are confident their kids can do well would volunteer. There was one college which followed homeschoolers and found they were as or more succesful in that college than public schooled peers. There was a recent small study in canada which showed homeschoolers averaging about the same as public schoolers on tests (but they didnt specify the selection criteria, if it was required of the homeschoolers or again self-selected), but when they broke it down to structured vs non-structured homeschoolers, the structured homeschoolers scored better than the average ps, and the unstructured scored lower.

but really, that isnt so suprising either. Kids who do well on standard curriculum and standardized testing are probably more likely to have parents who want to continue with that kind of structure. kids who really dont test well - their parents are probably more likely to take an alternative path where their kids can focus on their strengths, like art or drama or sports or socailizing or creative pursuits. IMO.

If your son is scoring well now, i'm sure he will continue to do so. It is possible to give a child a superior education by homeschooling, but homeschooling doesnt guarentee an academically superior education - after all, thats not all parents' goal.

This guy writes about home school studies and papers: http://gaither.wordpress.com/

bcnlvr
09-17-2011, 10:16 PM
LMAO. Somehow that doesn't surprise me!

Ok, in all honesty, I was *very persuasive* (debate team in high school). He was skeptical, but agreed to remain open-minded and give me one year (and we had to show results). I never had to show them as they were blatantly obvious within 9 weeks of ds9 being home. Then the scores came in (badda-bing!) Hubby is our most rabid fan now. It was he who said, "Why don't you bring ds6 home, too? It's only fair, right?" teehee

bcn :p

Shoe
09-17-2011, 10:26 PM
Ok, in all honesty, I was *very persuasive* (debate team in high school). He was skeptical, but agreed to remain open-minded and give me one year (and we had to show results). I never had to show them as they were blatantly obvious within 9 weeks of ds9 being home. Then the scores came in (badda-bing!) Hubby is our most rabid fan now. It was he who said, "Why don't you bring ds6 home, too? It's only fair, right?" teehee

bcn :pI certainly meant nothing but admiration. You seem like you have a strong personality and can express yourself well and forcefully. Nothing bad about that. (Or maybe I'm putting my foot in my mouth again??) Only fair? Absolutely. Glad to hear that you didn't have total opposition even with his initial skepticism.

Cheers.

Aandwsmom
09-17-2011, 10:34 PM
Mine was against it way back when oldest DS started Kindergarten. I didnt want them to go to PS, I wanted to homeschool. NOPE!
Boys went to PS through 5th grade and we were decently happy with it.
When oldest DS got into middle school, he had trouble. We saw it daily for the first few weeks and by week 5..... he was miserable. We were so livid at the school, we saw red and DH was on board to pull him and homeschool.
Our original plan was to homeschool him for the 6th grade year, get him up to par and send him back for 7th grade but to a different school.
Well, he did SO well that we ended up pulling youngest DS as well from the last part of 5th grade and homeschooled both.
DH wishes now we had done it years ago and is 100% willing to tell anyone who will listen.
The boys are now in 8th and 9th grade and are still homeschooled and we plan on homeschooling thru high school.

Maybe your DH will be on board if you pulled her for 2nd grade and did it at and she bloomed with it and he saw how much better she was? That was how we started, mine was willing to let me do it for the year and within a month he wanted it to be for all middle school and within a year we had decided to do it for all of high school as well. The changes in our boys 100% convinced him.

Accidental Homeschooler
09-17-2011, 11:20 PM
http://www.fraserinstitute.org/research-news/display.aspx?id=13088

You can download a summary of the research on hsing here (it includes mention of some of the sample problems) with sources. I like it even though it is from the Fraser Institute. Good luck!

bcnlvr
09-20-2011, 09:55 PM
I certainly meant nothing but admiration. You seem like you have a strong personality and can express yourself well and forcefully. Nothing bad about that. (Or maybe I'm putting my foot in my mouth again??) Only fair? Absolutely. Glad to hear that you didn't have total opposition even with his initial skepticism.

Cheers.

Poor dh has to live with a ISTP and closet daredevil for a spouse. :( I do try, though, to be more, um, chilled out? Less intense? Damn it's hard. I am like this IRL too and my friends say I scare people. What?! I'm REALLY NICE! Really!! :) ((hugs)) (okay, so not hugs.....yet...I'm not ready)

bcn

momofgrlz
09-20-2011, 10:20 PM
I had no idea so many hubby were so reluctant. Mine was on board from the very beginning. He was an advisor for 5 years at ASU and had hundreds of kids come through his door and he said the homeschooled kids were always so impressive and they were so well prepared that he had no reservations about homeschooling our girls. :) Hopefully he will come around. Sounds like an awful situation for your little one. :(

Deli76
09-21-2011, 12:50 AM
ok....heres an update. Hubby and I had a real long talk today after seeing our daughters school work. this is the "math problem"...

6:30

_______

What time is it?

UMMMM.....you have got to be kidding me!!!
I told my hubby, I can do better than this! This is rediculous. So I started to throw more stats and facts to him. I bookmarked some pages in the homeschooling books I bought and borrowed from the Library. I told him how the 2nd graders dont go to the library weekly, but our neices and nephews who are the same age ,+- a year, do. All the papers she brings home she has been doing since she was 4! Im not kidding you, the same exact papers, word for word, number for number...exact same book! Since she was 4!!! She is now 7, she will be 8 in February. She is asking me to teach her multiplication, she picked up the dictionary on her own and started reading it here and there. I showed him all the free programs and deeply discounted programs steered specifically towards homeschoolers, especially since he was so concerned about social interaction. And there is also a little girl a block away, her age, that home schools. I told him there is a homeschool co-op that is meeting this week, we can attend together, or I can go by myself, because I have plenty of concerns and questions, as everyone here can tell (LOL). If we both feel comfy with it, she will NOT be in school by the end of this week. Hubby and I actually sat down and talked about curriculum! WOW! And how we would like to teach her. I was amazed.
I have learned how different children are. My son, 16 yrs, loves school. He does very well. He plays violin, guitar, takes all pre AP classes and makes great grades. He is very social and hates it when summer comes because he likes school, misses the activities and ofcourse...his friends. He also goes to another school district. He started in that school district and I certainly dont want him in this school district. My daughter, she is social, she likes school, loves her friends. But the homework bores her and the teachers really stink! To come and find out, the art teacher is volunteering, she is NOT paid this year. The Advanced Reading program she was in last year was nixed. They no longer make weekly visits to the library. They have a book box in the class. Heres the kicker....
The school district she is in was investigated by the FBI in 2009. They were found guilty of misappropriation of $236 million dollars!!! They built a new stadium, this stadium was supposed to be upgraded and fixed. But no, they tore down the old one and built a whole new stadium with a press box, and it looks exactly like the old one. They also built 3 new baseball fields with a whole new sprinkler system for all using reclaimed water. And they tore down all the old buildings that were supposed to be upgraded. so please...tell me why I should send my daughter to such a sorry and corrupt school district??? I showed my hubby all this, and I believe he sees the light.
I wanted to thank everyone of you for your wonderful ideas and support. I really needed all of it. My whole family, except for my aunt who homeschooled all 3 of her children ( who are doing very well), were telling me to "Grin and bear it. Keep her in, she needs the socialization." You all are a great, wonderful, well informed and supportive group of people.
I will be contacting the secular co-op group, and hopefully meeting them by the end of this week. Wish me luck!!!

Accidental Homeschooler
09-21-2011, 01:02 AM
Hurray and good luck!

And sorry if I am being nosy, but where is this school district?

MarkInMD
09-21-2011, 05:12 AM
"She needs the socialization"?

She needs to learn something! The world is "socialization"!

Good for you and your DH. I hope this is the first step to something useful for your family.

Deli76
09-21-2011, 09:01 AM
Everyone I have talked to, the first words out of there mouths are "What about socialization?" She has plenty of friends in the neighborhood and a homeschooler down the street. She can get involved in a sport.There are plenty of resources specifically for homeschoolers around town. My response is what about a quality education?
The district is just outside of San Antonio, Tx. Alot of the older schools in San Antonio are closing due to declining attendance and funds. But the far north side of town is growing rapidly and they are having a hard time having enough staff for all the new kids. My sons district has enough funds for 2 sets of school books per student. He started off in that school district and he will stay there. He graduates in 2 yrs (eek!!). Supposedly San Antonio has one of the best economies in the U.S.. So where the tax revenue is going is beyond me. The FBI didnt state what happened to the funds for our district. Who knows??? All I know is my daughter deserves better.

bcnlvr
09-21-2011, 09:40 AM
I hope that it works out!

IMO (I seem to have a lot of those), institutionalization (ie socialization via public schools and via peer attachment) is unhealthy in many ways. Parent attachment and social development (via friends, extracurriculars, community service) is natural and healthy. OMG what did humans do before government schools?! We weren't cavemen. I really don't think we were meant to have 500 friends on FB and be in a classroom with 25-30 kids (and be expected to LEARN in an overstimulating environment like that). There are good articles and books on peer vs. parent attachment that might help your argument.

ps: differentiation of instruction is another good argument esp. if your child is asynchronous in her learning! But that's another thread!

bcn :)

Accidental Homeschooler
09-21-2011, 11:25 AM
The number of school days per year and hours per day are set based on academics and meeting proficiency goals. The twenty plus kids per class with one teacher is based on economics. Why do people assume that COINCIDENTLY these are exactly the circumstances that provide optimum "socialization", even oddly that this must be the only good way for children to be socialized?

AND, why do bullying, violence, suicide and the necessity of widespread medication to help kids cope with the structure of school, not suggest to anyone that maybe school is NOT a very good way to accomplish socialization?

AND, why do people assume that all children are similar enough to eachother that there is one best way for all of them to be "socialized"?

momofgrlz
09-21-2011, 01:34 PM
great news! Good luck and I hope it all works out. :)

Deli76
09-24-2011, 11:43 PM
YAY!!! I Have 70% of hubbies support!! Better than no support! He says that the other 30% says she needs that socialization. I told him that she will still have the socialization, not as much, but she will have a balance of socialization and more importantly an education. And he agrees.I need his support because we both work out of the home. He works in the garage and only leaves to drop off and pick up parts...usually at the end of the day. I am gone to meet with a client and an animal for no more than 2 hours a day. one of us is always here and our schedule is set. It leaves mornings for study and afternoons for socialization, or vice versa. Which leads to me to a few questions.
Do any of you work full or part time in or out of the home? how do you balance educating and work. Suggestions would be great. I know I have alot of questions, but I am so new to this. And trying to find a secular homeschool group is becoming a challenge. I found one but its on yahoo groups and no answer back yet. Im thinking it doesnt exist anymore.

MarkInMD
09-25-2011, 12:03 AM
I work full-time at home, although my wife is doing most of the schooling this year, as she's only teaching one class a week at the local community college. But last year I did three, sometimes four days a week with our older son (the younger was still in PS pre-K). What works for me may not work for you, but my hours are extremely flexible, so I just get up insanely early -- like 5 AM -- and work for a few hours before school, then try to squeeze in what I can if there's something he can do independently, then work later on in the evening. Now that we have two kids in HS, one in kindy who needs a lot of hands-on stuff, I can't really do that on the occasions I've had to be the only teacher. It's basically early in the morning and then after school and extracurriculars are done for the day. It's certainly doable if you have a flexible schedule and a child who cooperates at least the majority of the time. :)

Glad to hear that he's on board. There should be plenty of opportunities for her to get out and about where you are. Sports, art groups, drama clubs, whatever her interests are, I'll bet you can find something to suit it. Good luck!

afishy
09-25-2011, 10:13 AM
That's wonderful!! Good luck!!

I'm trying to restart my part time business and we homeschool. I've done both for about 5 years now. (We moved to a different state and I switched service offerings a bit, so the break business wise was important and needed. )

My suggestions would be: don't reinvent the wheel and don't be afraid to use a schedule.

Assuming the finances are there, it's very freeing to simply buy what you need to get her education done. There are many wonderful "school in a box" programs, some of which even tell you what to do on what day. I've been very fortunate that my kids are very linear thinkers. They don't actually like literature based schooling or on the fly activities. I had a bunch of high flautin ideas when we started and we've ended up with mostly workbooks/high quality teaching videos because the kids love the idea they they know when they are "done" for the day. :) I love the idea that for low cost I'm able to supply them with "masters" who know and love what they teach and have put that in book/video form. I probably couldn't do better anyway if I had all the time in the world.

If you are fortunate enough to have a homeschool store in your area, visit and ask for suggestions on workbooks and materials. They'll carry the most popular in the area and will be able to steer you in the right direct direction based on your and your daughter's needs as they are usually pretty familiar with what they carry.

Many families seem to be attracted by the freedom of homeschool and there is a great deal of that. However, I could never really sort of "unschool" properly (which if done correctly is a whole lot of work) and attempt to balance the needs of an outside employer/clients. We're on a schedule, which is written down and referred to when my brain runs out of room for it (which is frequently). :grin: Each topic is given roughly one 1/2 hour during a school day. (Non-skill based areas, such as history and science, aren't done every day.) If they run out of time, it's assigned as "homework" at the end of the day, but only for an additional 15-20 minutes.

We still get a lot of work done compared to PS and they are well under what they would spend going to school, hanging out there for 6 hours and coming back. We all still win, even though our daily lives have close to the same amount of scheduling as group schooling. And we do get to take vacations at odd times and get much later starts than the bused kids, etc, etc. :cool: