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View Full Version : Interesting blog post - Homeschooling Exodus: Junior High and High School



ksb427
07-15-2011, 09:09 AM
http://thepioneerwoman.com/homeschooling/2011/07/homeschooling-exodus-junior-high-and-high-school/

I think it's definitely possible to homeschool through high school with all the resources available now. If you have the time, read the comments - quite a variety there.

(Pioneer Woman HS blog posts have a slight Christian slant, but not over the top in my opinion.)

dbmamaz
07-15-2011, 10:45 AM
Ok, the comments have a pretty heavy xtian slant!! I am homeschooling my special needs son through high school. We only started in 8 th grade, because he really couldn't function in school. My daughter found the community college atmosphere so much easier than high school ( as in, they treated you like human beings rather than inmates) so I plan on sending him that route.

The yougetest one tho . . . I'm 46 and really want to get back to the work force to build up a retirement fund! I really hope that he gets serious enough to get in to the math and science specialty center fir high school. His father wants him back for middle school. But again, I'm homeschooling them because they totally hate school and have significant behavioral issues. I worry about sending him back before he has the maturity to choose to behave. Also, if he becomes more sled directed, which I could really see with this one, i would be willing to keep him home longer.

It is really hard to find other older kids.

mommykicksbutt
07-15-2011, 11:13 AM
Since this is a journey I've already done with my daughter and am now doing with my son 12 years later I totally agree that if you really want to homeschool through high school that you must seek out the resources to do so, the game does change from elementary to high school (middle school or jr high school is just review of the lower grades to ensure success in the higher grades) but really not that much.

Just know your limitations and find other source for what you can not provide/teach yourself. If you are weak in math then find a program or a tutor for that math class. How many of us have our kids in music lessons for piano, voice, or guitar yet we do not play or teach it? We hire a piano teacher for piano lessons etc, same concept for other subjects. Sometimes the curriculum allows for self teaching, of course this requires a self motivated student.

As far as activities go, each school district is different, you'll just have to ask them if your child can participate. Our department of defense school here lets any homeschool child take any class, participate in any sport if they make the team, participate in any extracurricular activity or club. The child does need to be "registered" so that the school can claim to the student as having provided something to the student (it's a money thing). If not going the public school route you could always ask the private schools if your student can participate in their programs. I know of private schools who have student come for only one class/activity. This can not be a solo case. Many communities provide outstanding recreational activities that soliciting schools may not be necessary. Although I was not homeschooled growing up I was very athletically inclined and participated in bowling leagues (two of them each season) during the school years as well as two softball leagues during the summers. My son as a homeschooler has done competitive gymnastics, swim team, and fencing (against brick and mortar school teams). Keep your eyes and ears open for homeschool teams too, they are out there although most likely christian groups. Keep open the possibility of starting something yourself. I've seen this done with brick and mortar schools too. Here at our local DoDSS last year we did not have a boy's wrestling team. A new family moved in, Dad was a wrestler in the academy, son was a wrestler at prior school. They started a wrestling team and a league with the other DoDSS schools here in Europe was born from their efforts. This year will be their first year of competition. Dad, not a school teacher, is the team's coach, a parent coach, not unheard of.

My daughter did not have any issues with college acceptance. She got in without a problem and with a scholarship to boot! She even graduated with honors, top of her class! The trend currently is that savvy college admission counselors are seeking homeschoolers for several reasons: Their academics are better documented then public school applicants (We can prove what our child learned the others can't); they are better socialized for the college environment (multiple ages); better study skills; and more likely to succeed and finish college amongst other factors. The key is to have the student meet the college requirements for admissions (your curriculum must cover the courses the college requires such as 4 years of English, 3 years of math to include Algebra, etc....) and document everything. Prepare several different formats of transcripts, have course descriptions ready if requested, and make a portfolio for each year. Different colleges will want different things from a homeschooler.

I personally could not cop out and give up my child to the system that had already proven to me that it was failing my child. To homeschool through high school was a no-brainer for us. It is in the best interest of my child to be homeschool though high school.

ksb427
07-15-2011, 11:45 AM
Ok, the comments have a pretty heavy xtian slant!!

True, but not really the posts which I read on a fairly regular basis.

ksb427
07-15-2011, 11:47 AM
My daughter did not have any issues with college acceptance. She got in without a problem and with a scholarship to boot! She even graduated with honors, top of her class! The trend currently is that savvy college admission counselors are seeking homeschoolers for several reasons: Their academics are better documented then public school applicants (We can prove what our child learned the others can't); they are better socialized for the college environment (multiple ages); better study skills; and more likely to succeed and finish college amongst other factors. The key is to have the student meet the college requirements for admissions (your curriculum must cover the courses the college requires such as 4 years of English, 3 years of math to include Algebra, etc....) and document everything. Prepare several different formats of transcripts, have course descriptions ready if requested, and make a portfolio for each year. Different colleges will want different things from a homeschooler.



Very encouraging and thanks for the reminders! Of course, I'm still overwhelmed and a bit scared, but I know we're doing the right thing.

jessica14
07-15-2011, 12:39 PM
Ok, the comments have a pretty heavy xtian slant!!.

I kind of thought so as well, especially when they were discussing Sonlight. I happen to like the company, but not their science. I'd be interested in knowing how colleges view creationist science in their acceptance process. Maybe that plays into some decisions, like taking science again or assuming, perhaps wrongly, that the student is not well rounded.

I do think its possible to home-school through high school. I would think you would want to more so just because of the stuff that goes on in in high school. I want them working on learning, not on all the other garbage they would have to deal with. Also, I think colleges look at many things, just not varsity sports and the like. I was always into the literary magazine and newspaper and I did fine.

farrarwilliams
07-15-2011, 02:55 PM
Remember that greatest fears thread? I keep changing my answer, I know... but *this* is one of my greatest fears. That age ten or eleven we'll suddenly lose all our wonderful, close friends to school. It's like when my boys turned three and our close knit little playgroup literally fell apart overnight as all the kids except ours went to preschool. We still run into some of them around, but it's not the same and it was so sad for us at the time - which is one of the reasons I think it's good for people intending to homeschool to band together and form friendships early.

Unless something radically changes, I fully intend to homeschool all the way through. But I've taught high school, so maybe that makes it seem less intimidating and makes me more disenchanted by it. Also, we live in an urban area with lots of easy opportunities to add extracurriculars outside of school, which I recognize not everyone has access to.

Topsy
07-15-2011, 04:38 PM
This has, ironically, been the hardest part of homeschooling high school - - the fact that we hardly know any other homeschoolers doing it!! We had so many great homeschool friends when my boys were in elementary and early junior high. Now...poof! They've vanished! I can count on two hands the number of high school homeschoolers we know IRL. So socialization and finding other teens to do homeschool-related activities with has by far been the biggest challenge over the last three years. The academic stuff is fairly easy to accommodate and even team sports (which fortunately, my boys haven't cared anything about) wouldn't be an issue in our local area because we have a homeschool sports league. I highly recommend anyone even slightly worried about transcripts, college transfer, etc, to just let their child move from homeschool graduation to a local community college for a year or two. They ALL accept homeschooled credits and then the CC credits are easily transferred to the college of your choice. Plus, you save a bundle in tuition!!

Mum
07-15-2011, 08:34 PM
I personally was not homeschooled until my senior year in high school. I BEGGED my parents to let me do it and they finally gave in. After 12 years of parochial school (k-11th) I NEVER felt so much freedom or excitement about learning and writing about what I'd learned until I homeschooled. My parents had minimal involvement. We used a Catholic correspondence curriculum. My world opened up so much for me that year. I actually originally homeschooled so that on my 18th birthday I could enter the convent I had chosen to enter. By the end of that year, my independent studies opened my world view which has only grown since that day. (you've probably figured out, I never became a nun) I will never stop thanking my parents for having the courage to let me homeschool in highschool.

I'm sharing this to encourage you to trust your HS kid's ability to steer themselves and find their own way outside of an institutional school if they can. Yes, the courses are more demanding but there are enough support systems set up for homeschoolers now that most of us can totally help them do it.

Stella M
07-15-2011, 10:51 PM
mommykicksbutt, not every child who doesn't home school through the high school years comes from a family who 'cops out'. Just saying.

dbmamaz
07-15-2011, 11:02 PM
Yeah, believe it or not, I see posts all the time from parents saying their kids are begging to go back to school. Public school isn't for everyone,, homeschooling isn't for everyone, unschooling isnt for everyone. Academic choice is a thing of beauty.

Stella M
07-15-2011, 11:27 PM
Yes, that.

Although I totally don't have any worries about not being able to teach high school; it's just the same as teaching primary school but more interesting. And I figure re-doing 4 years of high school maths is a good protection against Alzheimers.

coloradoalice
07-16-2011, 12:41 AM
Definitely good protection against Alzheimers! ;)

I intend to home school all the way through but the idea of that changing doesn't really bother me either. We will do what the kids need when we get to that point.

FrontPorch
07-16-2011, 02:25 PM
I am having the same problem. Here there are several middle/high school co-ops. But they are all Christian. Two of them openly list on their apps who they do not accept, all want to know your relationship to Christ. Even my secular friends put their kids in this group. I refuse based on principle. So my group fell apart and now I feel left behind. We are going to continue to homeschool at least for now.