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Teri
06-16-2011, 03:39 PM
sorry. I shouldn't be posting book recommendations. There are far more qualified individuals on this board than myself. I apologize for the inconvenience.

Jilly
06-16-2011, 04:00 PM
Thanks for posting this. My youngest son will enjoy reading books for this, and I am so happy to see The Children of Green Knowe on list 2. We have read the series and enjoyed it, but I hardly ever see it listed anywhere. It is a hidden gem worth reading.

Eileen
06-16-2011, 04:01 PM
Great list! I love that there is stuff on the 4-6 list that's fairly challenging. I might see if my dd will give it a shot. She's already read some of the list - she absolutely loved the Dark is Rising sequence.

Leanna
06-16-2011, 05:06 PM
This is great! Thanks for posting it!

Accidental Homeschooler
06-16-2011, 05:46 PM
Thank you! This is perfect for our summer.

Stella M
06-16-2011, 06:14 PM
Jilly! One of my favourite children's books too! We saw the movie of it recently - From Time to Time - nothing like the book but still a lovely film. I read it to the girls a few years ago and now I'm waiting with anticipation to read 'Green Knowe' to ds around Christmas time this year.

Great book list Teri, thanks. My girls have read quite a few of the suggested books but there is still plenty left to choose from! Although I think the K-3 suggestions are a bit limited. They look like K-1 to me, especially when you consider parents can read-aloud also.

rumbledolly
06-16-2011, 06:52 PM
Very cool thanks for posting. I don't see a deadline anywhere. Not sure if DD can read all these books this summer though she's probably read close to half of them already. As she just pointed out to me - she's doing the summer reading program at the library too!

farrarwilliams
06-16-2011, 07:48 PM
Very traditional, basic lists, but solid. The K-3 lists were, indeed, a little weird since it was mostly picture book and early reader fare, but with some classics thrown in, presumably as read alouds. A list that just suggests Frog and Toad, The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses and Alice in Wonderland all together can be sort of confusing since one is an early reader, one is a picture book and one is a lengthy children's classic.

Stella M
06-16-2011, 08:02 PM
The trouble I have with reading lists - even this one - is that they don't cater for gifted kids who have raced ahead with their reading and then find themselves with a gap. Cognitively, they can read and understand what's on the 9-12 lists, but only some of the books in that category speak to them as 12/13/14 year olds. So once they've read those few books they either read books that are emotionally too old for them or tread water. I'd love to see an alternate 9-12 list that is for children reading at a 9-12 level but not at an almost-adult emotional or interest level.

farrarwilliams
06-16-2011, 09:15 PM
Well, that high school list is just a very standard intro to classic literature list. I don't think there's many people - adult maturity or otherwise - who could emotionally connect to all those works. Honestly, I worry about the people who can emotionally connect to The Fountainhead. But a few of them would be good for younger readers... Willa Cather, Pearl Buck, Stephan Crane...

Stella M
06-16-2011, 10:32 PM
I guess. Idk, dd could read My Antonia, for instance, perfectly well but she'd probably get more out of it if she read it in a few years time. I'm a bit scarred by the whole girls book club loathing Cold Comfort Farm...

Some of my all time favourites are on these lists, although I will never, ever even suggest a child of mine reads Moby-Dick! That's just plain cruel...

kristinabrooke
06-16-2011, 11:25 PM
Awesome! I printed out the K-3 for my 5 year old daughter and felt so good because we've read 9 of the books on the list already. I was shocked to see that so many of the b0oks that we have read are not on the list, but we buy/borrow books all the time so this list will come in handy! Thanks for posting.

farrarwilliams
06-16-2011, 11:43 PM
Okay, maybe not My Antonia... but how about O, Pioneers! I think there's more out there in YA now for this very audience - MT Anderson, Markus Zusak, Jennifer Donnelly, John Green...

Laina
06-16-2011, 11:45 PM
Honestly, I worry about the people who can emotionally connect to The Fountainhead.

LOL!!

!!!! (too short)

Stella M
06-17-2011, 12:09 AM
Except I thought The Book Thief was over-rated :) Off to google the others, ta.

The Mensa Kids website is awesome, thanks so much for the link Teri - check out Living Poetically...just found something to add to my list of non-negotiables :)

Eta - the Donnelly books look perfect for my dd13, thank you!

farrarwilliams
06-17-2011, 08:38 AM
Oh good! I've only read A Northern Light, but it was excellent. Has she read Sarah Dessen? I'm not much of a fan of hers and it's not the literary stuff of Printz winners, but I think it's well-written - just not my taste at all. I did like The Book Thief... but it's also one of those books that got so much hype so it had a lot to live up to - I think I can agree that it might be overrated, even though I thought it was pretty good. I don't like that it's the "read this book to prove that YA can be good literature" book because YA is so much more than just one sort of book.

Eileen
06-17-2011, 09:35 AM
My 8 year old is in a similar gap. Cognitively she reads on a high school level, but emotionally she wouldn't understand a lot of books on that level, and a lot of it isn't appropriate for her. I really have to pick and choose. She loved the His Dark Materials series, which is in YA, but there's so much sexy vampire crap in that genre now that I won't let her pick her own books from that section. Our library does have a Juvenile Young Adult section, which is a step up from Juvenile/Intermediate but more appropriate in content. That's helpful.

I meant to quote an earlier post but messed up. Now this post looks unconnected. Oops.

farrarwilliams
06-17-2011, 10:15 AM
Eileen, I wouldn't give the vast majority of YA books to an 8 year old (His Dark Materials is definitely an exception - and it's often sold as middle grades too). Most YA books have an emotional component that isn't right for 8 year olds. But there's plenty of upper middle grades novels, especially if she likes fantasy. I'm not sure how your library has it divided exactly, but in the publishing industry, you talk about chapter books (short, like Magic Treehouse), middle grades (what we traditionally think of as "children's books" but it covers a huge age range) and YA (which is a more recent designation for books at an adult reading level that are typically more character driven than plot driven and usually include more grown up topics).

Have you done Jonathan Stroud's Bartimaeus books? How about Cornelia's Funke's Inkheart series or Dragonrider? How about Diana Wynne Jones? How about Suzanne Collins's Gregor series? I could go on and on there. And there are more literary offerings too. I really liked Kathi Appelit's Keeper and The Underneath, both of which are sort of contemporary fantasy but very literary. Or Savvy, which is short and sweet. Or When You Reach Me, which won the Newbery.

Teri
06-17-2011, 10:20 AM
Sorry. I made a mistake and posted an erroneous suggestion.

farrarwilliams
06-17-2011, 10:36 AM
Calpurnia Tate is a great one. But it's NOT a young adult book. It's a middle grades book. Just sayin'.

Eileen
06-17-2011, 12:05 PM
Eileen, I wouldn't give the vast majority of YA books to an 8 year old (His Dark Materials is definitely an exception - and it's often sold as middle grades too). Most YA books have an emotional component that isn't right for 8 year olds. But there's plenty of upper middle grades novels, especially if she likes fantasy. I'm not sure how your library has it divided exactly, but in the publishing industry, you talk about chapter books (short, like Magic Treehouse), middle grades (what we traditionally think of as "children's books" but it covers a huge age range) and YA (which is a more recent designation for books at an adult reading level that are typically more character driven than plot driven and usually include more grown up topics).

Have you done Jonathan Stroud's Bartimaeus books? How about Cornelia's Funke's Inkheart series or Dragonrider? How about Diana Wynne Jones? How about Suzanne Collins's Gregor series? I could go on and on there. And there are more literary offerings too. I really liked Kathi Appelit's Keeper and The Underneath, both of which are sort of contemporary fantasy but very literary. Or Savvy, which is short and sweet. Or When You Reach Me, which won the Newbery.

Yes, absolutely. I completely agree. The only time I venture in there for her is if we have a specific recommendation.

She has been steadily plowing through the library's fantasy recommendations for the last two years. She's read Charlie Bone, The Edge Chronicles, The Mysterious Benedict Society, Lewis Carroll stuff, The Dark is Rising, The Grey Griffins, of course Harry Potter and Percy Jackson, and a bunch of others that I won't list. Honestly, I'd really like her to stretch outside of the fantasy genre a bit, but I don't want to control what she picks for pleasure reading. We have the Inkheart books but she hasn't gotten around to them. I don't know why.

Eileen
06-17-2011, 12:10 PM
Oh, and thanks for the recommendations! I think the Bartimaeus and the Gregor books are on the library list, but not the other ones.

farrarwilliams
06-17-2011, 12:38 PM
Something like Keeper or maybe some Madeleine L'Engle would be a good fantasy, but still stretching thing for a kid with those tastes, I think. :)

Eileen
06-17-2011, 02:51 PM
I will check out Keeper. She did read A Wrinkle in Time last year and liked it OK, but it didn't grab her for some reason.

Teri
06-17-2011, 05:35 PM
I'm sorry. I thought we were looking for middle grade books. I will stop making suggestions now.

Stella M
06-17-2011, 06:31 PM
??? What happened here overnight ???

Teri, it was a great link! I've got 4-6, 7-8 and 9-12 printed out already. Dh got really bored of me reading the lists out to him :) We won't do the whole lists, but they are good, solid 'reminder' lists when looking for independent reading and/or read-alouds. And my dd13 is thrilled to have been given the 'Living Poetically' task on the MensaKids site...she loves to memorise poetry. I haven't come across the site before, so thanks again for sending a good resource my way.

I agree it's sometimes frustrating when a thread goes off on a tangent but that's just the way of conversations. Things generally meander back to the point. It would be great if you could repost the link; I'm putting it in this post but other people might not read this far.


http://mensaforkids.com (Click on the star in bottom left hand corner for reading lists.)

Valerie
06-17-2011, 06:38 PM
I thought they were good, too. I printed them out last night, and am looking forward to reading them! We may not read every selection, but it is a good starting point for us. Off now to check out the Living Poetically link.

mamareeb
06-17-2011, 07:47 PM
Loved the link and happy to be reminded of the site - also made me decide to go back thru my list of bookmarks this summer. I know there are so many other great resources out there I am not using but should be!!

farrarwilliams
06-17-2011, 08:37 PM
Teri, I'm sorry!!! I didn't mean to offend. I think there was something in the thing, which I can't remember now, where it said it was YA or something... but I wasn't down on the suggestion at all... I don't know... Eek. Really... maybe I needed a smiley there or something... D'oh.

And yeah... tangents. Sorry, guys.

Stella M
06-17-2011, 08:42 PM
Tangents happen. Sometimes I cause them, like here in this thread, sometimes I suffer them...they're nothing personal. And sometimes they are helpful and even delightful! It's no reflection on the original thread or the OP. Idk, I've been guilty of taking things too seriously on line before; wiser minds than mine recommended not taking things personally and its been good advice.

Eileen
06-18-2011, 07:28 AM
It was partly my fault too, sorry! I was enjoying all the recommendations, both YA and middle grades ones, but didn't mean to annoy anyone.

Accidental Homeschooler
06-18-2011, 10:50 AM
We went to the library and got started yesterday. Almost all the books on the K-3 list were already checked out but we did find a really nice very illustrated Alice in Wonderland and my daughter is into it. I think this is going to be a great list for her. Maybe, as pointed out previously, not so perfect for a third grader, but really good for us right now. I am trying to get my older dd interested in branching out in her reading. I have been trying to get her to read A Tree Grows in Brooklyn forever (it is always a mistake to get too enthusiastic as it seems to set off some sort of alarm for her). I loved that book in 8th grade and recently found it and read it again. We picked up National Velvet yesterday and I was informed that horse books are as stupid as horses and she isn't reading it until I do. Thirteen is turning out to be such a fun age.

Stella M
06-18-2011, 06:57 PM
Oh yes, I know what you mean! You should have seen the look on dd12's face when I handed her a copy of Jane Eyre to read for book club. Not happy.

She's got my number though - or she's been reading my posts! - because she told me 'she doesn't think she has the maturity to appreciate Jane Eyre', which is either true or clever, either option leaving me no choice but to bow to her better book judgement.

dbmamaz
06-18-2011, 07:23 PM
sorry. I shouldn't be posting book recommendations. There are far more qualified individuals on this board than myself. I apologize for the inconvenience.
Teri, dont be silly! Many people appreciated it and it started a great conversation. Put that link back!!!

Ariadne
06-18-2011, 07:31 PM
Oh, put the list back, please! I wanna see it, too!

Stella M
06-18-2011, 08:20 PM
Pg 3 I relinked in my post :)

Eileen
06-18-2011, 08:22 PM
sorry. I shouldn't be posting book recommendations. There are far more qualified individuals on this board than myself. I apologize for the inconvenience.

I am so sorry to see that you removed this! I saved the link and will definitely be using it. I'm not sure what happened to make you feel this way, but I'm sure that wasn't anyone's intention.

farrarwilliams
06-18-2011, 09:11 PM
I keep feeling funny about this. I'm really sorry... I know I'm opinionated about children's books but I seriously don't mean to close out any other opinions. Or to make Teri feel bad. I really don't know where that went so wrong. I feel like this arose from me quibbling about the difference between mg and ya books... which... really, it's just a publishing distinction and the only reason I think it even matters is that kids who read at a high level early often have parents who push for them to read the books that older kids are reading, which isn't always appropriate emotionally, like what Melissa said. I just... Sigh. I really apologize to anyone I caused any offense to.

Stella M
06-19-2011, 01:27 AM
Well, bitter experience has taught me that it's better to err on the side of assuming people aren't trying to offend you.

Things just sometimes sound wrong - it's much harder to communicate tone on line. Even with people you feel you get on well with online - sometimes a comment can leave you second guessing about whether it sounds snarky or is snarky. That's why I'm always using stupid smilies left, right and centre :)

But really, I've never seen anyone who posts regularly here choose to be offensive for the sake of it or have the intention of saying they are better or more knowledgeable than others.

It's much easier on everyone all round if we assume that something that sounds a bit 'off' isn't meant that way at all.

Because as I've found, if you are quick to take offence, the whole thing escalates and gets uglier and angstier, benefiting nobody. I could have saved myself some grief if I'd taken that advice from the people who offered it to me sooner :(

So I hope that doesn't offend anybody...it's not at all holier than thou...trust me, I'm as touchy as they come :)

jessica14
06-19-2011, 09:27 AM
I'm sorry to see Teri bow out of such a good OP. I went to the link on page 3 and think its a great site and great reading lists! My DD is reading at a 4th or 5th grade level at 8, but I think those books are just not going to be her cup of tea. The K-3 books are such a mixed bag, but she seems excited to do it and it will give her a sense of accomplishment to mix a more challenging book with a Harry the Dirty Dog type book.

Ariadne
06-19-2011, 09:31 AM
Well, bitter experience has taught me that it's better to err on the side of assuming people aren't trying to offend you.

Things just sometimes sound wrong - it's much harder to communicate tone on line. Even with people you feel you get on well with online - sometimes a comment can leave you second guessing about whether it sounds snarky or is snarky. That's why I'm always using stupid smilies left, right and centre :)

But really, I've never seen anyone who posts regularly here choose to be offensive for the sake of it or have the intention of saying they are better or more knowledgeable than others.

It's much easier on everyone all round if we assume that something that sounds a bit 'off' isn't meant that way at all.

Because as I've found, if you are quick to take offence, the whole thing escalates and gets uglier and angstier, benefiting nobody. I could have saved myself some grief if I'd taken that advice from the people who offered it to me sooner :(

So I hope that doesn't offend anybody...it's not at all holier than thou...trust me, I'm as touchy as they come :)Signing on to this. I've been participating in groups online for 20 years now, and it definitely *does* work better if you assume the best. It's been said a million times but it bears repeating: tone is hard to convey in this medium.

Satori
06-19-2011, 03:39 PM
I'm glad this list was posted. Thanks for sharing it! I'm sorry you took it down, but thanks to the person who put the link up later.