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Lou
06-11-2011, 02:19 AM
My son was having a BAD day recently. I think because our week has been out of sorts due to an event happening this weekend. Anyhow, he's had a lot of TV & outside playtime with his sister. No playdates, no friends, no schooling. Not our normal routine.

My son is his own person, not mainstream (hence the reason we are homeschooling, he doesn't fit the box very well) He hasn't been given a formal label for his quirky behaviors, because he doesn't seem to fit in any of those label boxes either.

Well my father in law (my son's grandfather) had old friends/company visiting that wanted to see the grandchildren, so I sent the kids over for a visit. I stayed home. The next day I ran into my FIL's company. The woman and I talked for a long while (about an hour) and in the middle of that conversation somewhere she mentioned she enjoyed seeing my children. And that my son never stopped, he was so active and all over the place and never sat still. Did I think he was dyslexic?

Is that an odd comment? Is busy a charateristic of dylexia? My husband suffered as a child from dylexia, so it's very possible, but had never heard busy/active associated with it. This woman is a retired taecher who at one point or another has taught all grade levels. So maybe she knows something I don't??? I'm not a proud mother, but rather a mother that would prefer to know sooner then later if my child has any special needs.

Stella M
06-11-2011, 02:25 AM
I don't know anything about special needs! But my son is 7 and he is all over the place and never stops either. My Dad calls it 'essence of boy' :) I would think that if you have concerns about your son's reading, that is one thing. Being active, that's another. But anyway, Sorry about a rough day and a comment that has got you second guessing yourself.

clancariens
06-11-2011, 07:12 AM
Maybe she got her "terms" messed up and meant hyper-active!

Topsy
06-11-2011, 09:13 AM
My son has dyslexia and he was definitely shall we say..."active"...growing up, but I never felt like the two were necessarily connected. I've read some books on dyslexia, though, that make a strong connection between hyperactivity and dyslexia. I've read others, however, that never even mention activity level. I CAN say that the constant movement of my kiddo was never something I sought out help for. We were homeschooling....what did it matter if he needed to get his groove on?? :) It was the reading/writing issues that caused us to start researching dyslexia.

Teri
06-11-2011, 10:16 AM
My daughter has dyslexia and it is not a trait that she has at all. The boys in her dyslexia class at Scottish Rite, though, were all dual diagnosed with dyslexia and ADHD. So you can have both, but having one does not necessarily mean that you have both.

Could the two thoughts maybe not have been connected? Did you ask her what made her think of dyslexia? Like, did she have him read to her?

dbmamaz
06-11-2011, 10:32 AM
yes, thats what I was wondering - she commented on his activity level and then also wanted to mention something about dyslexia. perhaps she thought he was so bright he should be reading by now?

MarkInMD
06-12-2011, 02:07 PM
I'm not so sure of the cause/effect relationship here. I can tell you that with our active 5-year-old, I have slight concerns about dyslexia, but they're more than likely just typical things that kids who are just learning to read and write do. His main thing is reversing number order, as in writing "21" when he means "12." That's fairly common with him. As I said, I'm not stressed about it, but if it's this way in a couple years, then I'll know something's up. Still, I'd hesitate to call the two connected, but I have nothing to base that on other than my general caution and skepticism.

EKS
06-12-2011, 06:18 PM
Maybe she meant to say ADHD.

My son has dyslexia and ADHD and he was pretty busy when he was younger.

As an aside, dyslexia can cause quirky behavior--particularly dyslexia combined with giftedness. It is frequently mistaken for Asperger's.

MrsLOLcat
06-12-2011, 09:15 PM
Yeah that's an odd comment in my mind, too. I wouldn't necessarily relate one to another. I used to tutor a dyslexic girl, and she was definitely not hyperactive. My son *is* hyper (ADHD) and has tracking issues related to an eye issue he had when he was younger, but he's not dyslexic. Odd comment.

Lou
06-12-2011, 10:39 PM
My son has dyslexia and he was definitely shall we say..."active"...growing up, but I never felt like the two were necessarily connected. I've read some books on dyslexia, though, that make a strong connection between hyperactivity and dyslexia. I've read others, however, that never even mention activity level. I CAN say that the constant movement of my kiddo was never something I sought out help for. We were homeschooling....what did it matter if he needed to get his groove on?? :) It was the reading/writing issues that caused us to start researching dyslexia.

We are homeschooling, so like you it makes no difference to me if he wants to bounce off the walls, in fact he seems to 'get' his lessons when he's able to move about. His dad had dyslexia as a child...so it really wouldn't suprise me if one day we found out our son also was dyslexic.



Could the two thoughts maybe not have been connected? Did you ask her what made her think of dyslexia? Like, did she have him read to her?

I think they were connected, because she continued on about his level of busy after questioning me about dyslexia...the question was directly in the middle of her observation of his activity levels.


yes, thats what I was wondering - she commented on his activity level and then also wanted to mention something about dyslexia. perhaps she thought he was so bright he should be reading by now?

He can read...but she may or may not know that...I highly doubt she asked him to read to her.


Maybe she meant to say ADHD.

My son has dyslexia and ADHD and he was pretty busy when he was younger.

As an aside, dyslexia can cause quirky behavior--particularly dyslexia combined with giftedness. It is frequently mistaken for Asperger's.

Our family doctor thinks gifted and bored. Dyslexia is a strong possiblity because his dad is. Gifted is possible because I was. (I say was, because I dumbed myself down in high school, not sure if the 'gift' is still around or if I'm just plain old quirky! hee, hee) I did take him to be tested for Asperger's when he was almost 4 and they told me he didn't have enough traits to be on the spectrum. So who knows....maybe we'll find out gifted and dyslexic???

As for now, I just wondered if activity levels and dyslexia were related...because it seemed like an odd statement/question coming from someone who has met my children 2 times in their lives for less then an hour each time.

Teri
06-12-2011, 11:01 PM
It's not unusual for a child with dyslexia to be "gifted". Part of the diagnosis is having above average intelligence coupled with the issues in reading.
My daughter definitely has some other traits that I associate with the dyslexia, but she would never be mistaken for Aspergers. Her issues have to do with how she understand instructions, some issues with numbers, counting, money, etc.

You can't become "ungifted". Even if you aren't "achieving", giftedness has to do with your potential to achieve, not the actual achievement.
My guess is that she mixed up her terms and meant to say hyperactive or ADHD.

It's important to note that once dyslexic, always dyslexic. If your husband was diagnosed with dyslexia as a child, he still is even if he has learned to compensate for it.

Lou
06-13-2011, 01:23 AM
It's not unusual for a child with dyslexia to be "gifted". Part of the diagnosis is having above average intelligence coupled with the issues in reading.
My daughter definitely has some other traits that I associate with the dyslexia, but she would never be mistaken for Aspergers. Her issues have to do with how she understand instructions, some issues with numbers, counting, money, etc.

You can't become "ungifted". Even if you aren't "achieving", giftedness has to do with your potential to achieve, not the actual achievement.
My guess is that she mixed up her terms and meant to say hyperactive or ADHD.

It's important to note that once dyslexic, always dyslexic. If your husband was diagnosed with dyslexia as a child, he still is even if he has learned to compensate for it.

RE: myself and being gifted, re: IQ tests, I still have very high scores, but when it comes to daily life, I feel I'm fairly average and at times I feel a bit on the short end of smarts, depending on how confident the person I'm speaking to is. I know what I know well, but I am horrible at verbalizing what's in my head. :/

As for the hubby, I am always unsure about that...he was diagnosed with dyslexia as a child, yet he must of learned to compensate for it, because it doesn't bother him anymore.

We are all quirky in our own ways. I'm not concerned with my son's adult life as we all find our way...but if I can help make his childhood a happy one with less struggle, I'm game and I would love to know how his brain is working!

Eileen
06-13-2011, 04:49 PM
m2wandc - I know what you mean about testing high, but not feeling too smart when it comes to actual life. I'm just like that - high IQ, high test scores generally, but not really fulfilling all that potential. It's the major reason I'm pulling my highly gifted 8 year old out of school. I really don't want her dragged down by the system the way I was.