PDA

View Full Version : Dyslexia question



Busygoddess
04-22-2011, 08:00 PM
We're pretty sure that Jay has dyslexia. Actually, both kids show signs. Jay's symptoms are much more pronounced, though. The funny thing is, neither one has any problems with reading or comprehension. Anyway, my sis & her fiance work part time for a dyslexia center. So, we were talking to her fiance today & he is going to get me some of the training materials they use for training tutors. That way, I can see if it is something that we can implement here at home or not. If not, we'd have to drive to another city 2x a week. We figure implementing it at home would be ideal. It would be a natural part of his day & schooling. We could also use the techniques with Dea to help her. Plus, we wouldn't have to pay for fuel to drive to & from another city twice a week.

My question is this, does anyone here have personal experience with the Orton Gillingham Approach? I'm just wondering how difficult it would be to implement at home. I'll find out within a week or so, when he brings me the training materials. I just thought I'd see if anyone could share any personal experiences using it with their kids.

Also, how much did it help with areas other than reading - spelling, writing, math?

Lou
04-22-2011, 09:02 PM
So curious to hear more about this topic...and maybe some ideas on HOW TO TEACH the dyslexia child...I'm not 'exactly sure' of the detailed "SIGNS" but my hubby suffered dearly for his dyslexia as a child in school. And I have been wondering lately if our son is showing some signs and if there are better ways to teach dyslexic children, etc...

sarahb1976
04-22-2011, 09:56 PM
My 13 yr old has dyslexia. He learnt to read rather slowly, not becoming fluent until 8. Once he became reasonably good at it he took off and I figured problem solved.

Not so much.

At 13 his spelling is pretty behind.

We use All About Spelling, which is O-G based, to remediate spelling. It teaches EXPLICIT phonics. It should also help his reading.

When his dyslexia was discovered, by accident as part of a neuro psych eval at age 10, he read at the 9th gr level but spelled at 2nd gr level.

Dyslexia is a problem of sequencing. For this reason things like long division can really throw kids. They mix up the sequence of the steps.

Obviously he has coped very very well with reading strategies on his own. Its been interesting. Not rushing into algebra for obvious reasons.

Lou
04-23-2011, 02:25 AM
What is O-G based?
Where would one start if they wanted to have their child evaluated for dyslexia?

Busygoddess
04-23-2011, 08:34 AM
My 13 yr old has dyslexia. He learnt to read rather slowly, not becoming fluent until 8. Once he became reasonably good at it he took off and I figured problem solved.

Not so much.

At 13 his spelling is pretty behind.

We use All About Spelling, which is O-G based, to remediate spelling. It teaches EXPLICIT phonics. It should also help his reading.

When his dyslexia was discovered, by accident as part of a neuro psych eval at age 10, he read at the 9th gr level but spelled at 2nd gr level.

Dyslexia is a problem of sequencing. For this reason things like long division can really throw kids. They mix up the sequence of the steps.

Obviously he has coped very very well with reading strategies on his own. Its been interesting. Not rushing into algebra for obvious reasons.

We stopped using Spelling programs years ago. Dea would do great on all the Spelling assignments & ace the test. However, using those same words in her writing was another story. So, I stopped using program, because they just didn't work. We started doing a word-a-day thing. I give one word each day. It is her spelling & vocabulary word. She has to look it up in the dictionary, learn the definition, part of speech, origin/root, and use it as much as possible in writing and conversations that day. It has helped, we've seen improvement in her spelling. I'll try AAS with Jay & maybe with Dea, too.
Both kids read quite well, when reading to themselves. Reading aloud is different, though. They struggle with words I know they know & stumble a lot. I'm the same way, so didn't give it much thought in the beginning. I hate reading aloud because I have to slow down so much to do it. They both have problems with spelling and writing. Jay is having problems with Math now, too. He knows the correct answer (he says all the problems out loud as he does them, so I hear him say the right answer), but writes them down backwards. He'll say "8 times 3 is 24," but he'll write 42 instead of 24. This becomes more of a problem when he's doing multi-digit problems, because he'll end up carrying the wrong digit. He doesn't do it all the time, but he's starting to do it more often.
Dh has dyslexia, so we've been watching for signs of it. Dh had to learn to deal with it on his own, and we wanted to make sure that we knew if the kids had it, so we could help. I'm not sure if Dea has mild Dyslexia or if her problems are due to her ADHD & Bipolar. I figure, even if it isn't mild dyslexia, the methods to help dyslexics should still help her. I'm certain Jay has Dyslexia, though.

Busygoddess
04-23-2011, 08:38 AM
What is O-G based?
Where would one start if they wanted to have their child evaluated for dyslexia?

Orton Gillingham. It's the multi-sensory method used to help dyslexics. To have your child evaluated for dyslexia, you need to take him to a child psychologist.

Lou
04-23-2011, 12:47 PM
DH had sever dyslexia as a kid and I'm guessing our son is a strong canidate as well. He is EXTREMELY bright and understands complex concepts, yet he doesn't fit into any box and he is perplexing to me when I try to figure out WHY/WHERE he's coming from at times. Like mentioned above, he understands complex math but when writing the answer at least 50% of the time it's backwards. The school he used to go to said it's normal for 5 year olds, and we were told to wait until he's 8 or so to know for sure. But gees that's 3 years of frustration for him if he is dyslexic...I'd rather be teaching him in a way that is HELPFUL to his confidence rather then HURTFUL. KWIM? He reads really well, but again when writing his words (writing is our HARDEST CHALLENGE of our school day) he will write letters backwards and sometimes upside down.

Once at the library the librarian asked him to draw a picture and she would hang it on the window...so he did, she told him to put his name on it, he wrote his name backwards (so if you held it to a mirror you could read it properly) and I asked him why he did that since he can write his name correctly and he said, because she told him she was hanging it on the window and he wanted to make sure the people on the outside of the window could read it....not sure if that's clear logic, but you can see where his mind was...

Lou
04-23-2011, 12:49 PM
Orton Gillingham. It's the multi-sensory method used to help dyslexics. To have your child evaluated for dyslexia, you need to take him to a child psychologist.

Thanks...I think I'll look into it a bit :)

Busygoddess
04-23-2011, 01:20 PM
DH had sever dyslexia as a kid and I'm guessing our son is a strong canidate as well. He is EXTREMELY bright and understands complex concepts, yet he doesn't fit into any box and he is perplexing to me when I try to figure out WHY/WHERE he's coming from at times. Like mentioned above, he understands complex math but when writing the answer at least 50% of the time it's backwards. The school he used to go to said it's normal for 5 year olds, and we were told to wait until he's 8 or so to know for sure. But gees that's 3 years of frustration for him if he is dyslexic...I'd rather be teaching him in a way that is HELPFUL to his confidence rather then HURTFUL. KWIM? He reads really well, but again when writing his words (writing is our HARDEST CHALLENGE of our school day) he will write letters backwards and sometimes upside down.

Once at the library the librarian asked him to draw a picture and she would hang it on the window...so he did, she told him to put his name on it, he wrote his name backwards (so if you held it to a mirror you could read it properly) and I asked him why he did that since he can write his name correctly and he said, because she told him she was hanging it on the window and he wanted to make sure the people on the outside of the window could read it....not sure if that's clear logic, but you can see where his mind was...

Yeah, my son also writes letters backwards & forms them strange (he starts & ends in unusual places, instead of the way you normally write them). Whenever he writes anything, I have to remind him "z faces the other way sweetie" or " your j is backward," etc. He even writes capital 'D' backwards sometimes. He does it with his numbers, too. I'll be looking over his work & have to remind him that 3 or 7 faces the other way or ask "is that a 2 or a 6?"

If the training materials I get aren't enough, I'll actually be signing up for training through the center. That way, I can work with Jay here at home, instead of taking him to sessions twice a week. I'm already working with both kids on dealing with & controlling their ADHD and working with Dea on dealing with her Bipolar & controlling her emotions. So, adding in working with Dyslexia should be fairly simple.

Lou
04-24-2011, 02:23 AM
2, 3, 4, 5, 7.....a, b, d, g, p, q, s...are the most commonly flipped numbers & letters for my son.

If he starts a word towards the end of the paper, he will melt when he realizes he doesn't have enough room for his word.

If I say something about a number being backwards, he acts as though he feels shame (not sure if he was corrected in a negative way at school?) so at times I won't point it out blantantly, but rather I'll show him praise for those that are facing the correct way or write MY answer next to his with the numbers/letters going the correct way to see if he notices, which most of the time he does notice and then he'll want to fix it. I'm just wondering if it's something you outgrow or something you have to work on your whole life? I'll have to ask my hubby more about his experience with it.

Topsy
04-24-2011, 12:39 PM
We used Saxon Phonics Intervention for one year when DS was in 6th grade and I was very happy with it. It has a LOT of O-G aspects to it, can be done from home (be sure to get the home study version, though!) and if you check for it on ebay, can be quite affordable too. AND...the best part...it is super parent-friendly...all lessons are laid out clearly and explicitly...no special training required. His spelling and reading skills made a considerable jump after using this program.

laundrycrisis
04-24-2011, 03:28 PM
Some parts of "dyslexia" and are visual processing issues and some are auditory processing issues. And some are central language, sequential memory, and other memory issues. Orton Gillingham is an intensive phonics approach. It is most helpful for students whose issues are mostly auditory - they have trouble with letters representing sounds and combinations of letters being interpreted as sounds with phonics rules. When I was researching dyslexia I noticed that some dyslexia "experts" are totally focused on phonics-related issues and try to define this exact problem as dyslexia, and many "dyslexia" programs are almost completely geared toward phonics. This narrow definition of and approach to dyslexia is completely unhelpful for a person whose dyslexia is not related to auditory issues. If you do a search on "dyseidetic dyslexia" you will get some different viewpoints on dyslexia. Here is one:

http://dyslexia.learninginfo.org/dyseidetic.htm

Our son's issues that were symptoms of dyslexia were mostly visual processing. He never had any auditory-related problems so intensive phonics approaches were not that helpful for him. He sees an OG tutor once a week, but she realized early on that he did not need the intensive phonics because he got phonics - he needed help with visual recognition because that is required to build fluency.

He did vision therapy with a COVD optometrist for one year. The first half of the therapy was for eye-teaming issues related to his amblyopia. The second half was all for visual processing problems - specifically visual closure, form constancy and visual sequential memory. He also did a lot of work on left-right, and exercises with crossing his body's mid-line, and mental work on visualizing things in general. He just turned 8. He has finally started building some fluency. He is so happy that he can remember words now.

I also used a therapeutic handwriting program for him that is used by occupational therapists who work with dysgraphic students. It is called First Strokes. The emphasis is on the first stroke that makes the letter. This makes it much easier for him to get b and d right. Nothing else I tried before this worked for him. He is still a long way from writing being easy for him but he is getting there. He is also learning to type with Type to Learn and I just introduced him to cursive, and he likes it and is excited about learning it.

Teri
04-24-2011, 03:57 PM
Orton Gillingham is a highly recognized method of working with children with dyslexia.
My daughter received services for two years from Scottish Rite Hospital for Children's Dyslexia Lab. It was incredibly successful for her.
Since they do a lot of research on dyslexia, she was part of a pilot program that treated 5 children that were 6 years old.
She went in not able to identify most letters, certainly not reading ANYTHING. Math was not much better, but it tested "normal". She definitely had the same types of issues with numbers as she did with letters. At 6, she could not count above ten. She still forgets the names for 11, 12 and 13 and calls them 1-1, 1-2 and 1-3.
When she graduated last year, after two years, she had gone from barely measurable preschool level to a fifth grade level in reading. Her results were so off the charts that she is considered an outlier though and will not be used in any research that they publish.

I hope they follow up with her to see how she does in the future though.

Lou
04-24-2011, 06:59 PM
I'm not sure what 'missing link' my son has, he can identify all letters, numbers, letter sounds, sounding out words, etc...NO PROBLEMS...If he watches a DVD on math, reading, phonics, etc he will remember it verbatim....When he was 3 he loved to write, he wrote all the time...yet at age 5 (almost 6) the ONLY issue we have seen so far is writing....he flips his numbers & letters almost all the time, he starts them from the bottom up (can't get top down, left to right). He can't seem to grasp spacing of letters, words, sentences, etc... So I'm really confused on "where" his learning style deficit lays...visual or audio??? I just don't know? I do know hand writing lessons are terrible for both of us, he hates seeing anything that requires writing and he goes immediately into tears, whines, protests, etc the second he sees those 'spaces' that require words to be written down by him. :/ The 'lined paper' for hand writing practice would send him into a massive fit in an instant because he would think it meant a FULL PAGE of writing.

Just wish I knew what his problem was so I could find ways to help him overcome it or learn in a way that is suitable to him.

Lou
04-24-2011, 07:34 PM
I'm already working with both kids on dealing with & controlling their ADHD and working with Dea on dealing with her Bipolar & controlling her emotions. So, adding in working with Dyslexia should be fairly simple.

WOW...sounds like you are a saint and have your hands full...if you have any tips along the way for those of us embarking on homeschooling a child with a potiental difference, please spill the beans...I'm pro-early detection, assistance, etc...so you will not offend me suggesting anything...this is a "proud mama" of her children regardless of their differences if there are any. :)

laundrycrisis
04-24-2011, 09:00 PM
I'm not sure what 'missing link' my son has, he can identify all letters, numbers, letter sounds, sounding out words, etc...NO PROBLEMS...If he watches a DVD on math, reading, phonics, etc he will remember it verbatim....When he was 3 he loved to write, he wrote all the time...yet at age 5 (almost 6) the ONLY issue we have seen so far is writing....he flips his numbers & letters almost all the time, he starts them from the bottom up (can't get top down, left to right). He can't seem to grasp spacing of letters, words, sentences, etc... So I'm really confused on "where" his learning style deficit lays...visual or audio??? I just don't know? I do know hand writing lessons are terrible for both of us, he hates seeing anything that requires writing and he goes immediately into tears, whines, protests, etc the second he sees those 'spaces' that require words to be written down by him. :/ The 'lined paper' for hand writing practice would send him into a massive fit in an instant because he would think it meant a FULL PAGE of writing.

Just wish I knew what his problem was so I could find ways to help him overcome it or learn in a way that is suitable to him.

That sounds possibly visual. DS1's perception of letter sizing and letter and word spacing was waaaaayy off before he had the vision therapy for eye teaming. Hatred of and difficulty writing is "dysgraphia". Or it could be basic handwriting difficulties. It's a complex task that requires a bunch of different skills to fit together at the same time. Some kids do not have all these things working together yet at six. You could try a program for handwriting at home for little cost (the First Strokes one I used is not expensive at all). He is young. He may just need this type of program. If that does not resolve the problems, you may want to have him evaluated by a COVD optometrist. Our son was almost seven when he had his evaluation. I had been trying to get him started in reading and writing since he was 5.5 with almost no progress. Another option would be an evaluation by an occupational therapist who works with handwriting issues.

laundrycrisis
04-24-2011, 09:04 PM
I would also like to add that our son has great difficulty with sequencing. He still has trouble remembering the numbers 1-10 in order. His vision therapist taught me a home method for helping him with sequences using alternating red and blue marker and visualizing parts of a sequence mentally with his eyes closed after studying it with his eyes. This has made a great difference for some things. He is coming along with keeping numbers in order. He is 8 and would be in third grade this fall. Spelling is of course a challenge with this going on. Basic things like our address and phone number are also very challenging. But I am so happy he is reading and beginning to write.

Busygoddess
04-25-2011, 09:49 AM
WOW...sounds like you are a saint and have your hands full...if you have any tips along the way for those of us embarking on homeschooling a child with a potiental difference, please spill the beans...I'm pro-early detection, assistance, etc...so you will not offend me suggesting anything...this is a "proud mama" of her children regardless of their differences if there are any. :)

I've heard the saint comment before, but no, not a saint. I will admit to having my hands full, though. As for tips, the best I could give is to listen to your kids - what they say & what they do. My kids' abilities, strengths, weaknesses, & learning styles play a large role in our schooling. I don't accept excuses - there is no "I can't focus because I have ADHD," or similar comments. There are a lot of trial periods - we'll try this & see how it works. Each person with ADHD, Dyslexia, Bipolar, etc. will have their own individual ways of dealing with it, even when taught to use the same tools. So, there is trial & error in finding what works best for that child & how they best work with their condition. The biggest thing, is learning to ignore (or at least using common sense to examine what they say) the so-called experts (I actually had to do this when I was in school, teaching myself to deal with my ADHD). Over ther years, I have read so many tips, ideas, and pieces of advice, from 'experts,' that are really just ways to avoid the issue. I've seen experts suggest that people with ADHD just use disposable dishes & silverware, so they don't have to worry about remembering to wash them. I've seen other pieces of advice that are just as ridiculous, for ADHD, Bipolar, and other conditions. So, I had to accept that my experiences are more important than the opinions of the 'experts' when it comes to me & my family. Most people don't want to do that, though. They can't let go of the idea that the 'experts' know more than the average person.

Busygoddess
04-25-2011, 09:49 AM
Thank you for all the responses, everyone. I really appreciate hearing all your stories.

kcanders
04-25-2011, 10:06 AM
We stopped using Spelling programs years ago. Dea would do great on all the Spelling assignments & ace the test. However, using those same words in her writing was another story. So, I stopped using program, because they just didn't work. We started doing a word-a-day thing. I give one word each day. It is her spelling & vocabulary word. She has to look it up in the dictionary, learn the definition, part of speech, origin/root, and use it as much as possible in writing and conversations that day. It has helped, we've seen improvement in her spelling. I'll try AAS with Jay & maybe with Dea, too.
Both kids read quite well, when reading to themselves. Reading aloud is different, though. They struggle with words I know they know & stumble a lot. I'm the same way, so didn't give it much thought in the beginning. I hate reading aloud because I have to slow down so much to do it. They both have problems with spelling and writing. Jay is having problems with Math now, too. He knows the correct answer (he says all the problems out loud as he does them, so I hear him say the right answer), but writes them down backwards. He'll say "8 times 3 is 24," but he'll write 42 instead of 24. This becomes more of a problem when he's doing multi-digit problems, because he'll end up carrying the wrong digit. He doesn't do it all the time, but he's starting to do it more often.
Dh has dyslexia, so we've been watching for signs of it. Dh had to learn to deal with it on his own, and we wanted to make sure that we knew if the kids had it, so we could help. I'm not sure if Dea has mild Dyslexia or if her problems are due to her ADHD & Bipolar. I figure, even if it isn't mild dyslexia, the methods to help dyslexics should still help her. I'm certain Jay has Dyslexia, though.
This sound just like my kids. When Ian was in school, if he studied really hard he could get all his spelling words right on the test on friday, but could not spell anything right when writing. We had an teacher tutor him with Orton Gillingham in third grade and it helped a lot. He would spell something correct and I would ask him how he knew that and he would spit out whatever O-G rule he had used. I was amazed. When we started homeschooling this year we didn't do any spelling because the only thing that had worked for him in the past had been O-G and I didn't see any point in doing spelling that he would forget. It just seemed like a pointless exercise. Then we found all about spelling and it worked great for them. We actually just switched Ian to Phonetic Zoo from IEW. He really likes it so far. It also focuses on phonetic rules, but he likes the way the lessons are set up a little better than AAS. My daughter is still using AAS and doing well. I like that AAS is pretty straight forward to implement.

Ian is the same way with reading. He reading and comprehension is great when he reads silently (several grade levels ahead), but he stumbles a lot when reading orally. He hates reading orally because of it and will try to get out of it whenever possible.

Maddie is like Jay and reverses multi-digit numbers all the time. She also had a really hard time with short vowel sounds. She has a very hard time choosing between e/i and o/u. I hadn't noticed until recently that she was having these problems so I'm still trying to figure out what to do.

Lou
04-25-2011, 10:35 AM
I've heard the saint comment before, but no, not a saint. I will admit to having my hands full, though. As for tips, the best I could give is to listen to your kids - what they say & what they do. My kids' abilities, strengths, weaknesses, & learning styles play a large role in our schooling. I don't accept excuses - there is no "I can't focus because I have ADHD," or similar comments. There are a lot of trial periods - we'll try this & see how it works. Each person with ADHD, Dyslexia, Bipolar, etc. will have their own individual ways of dealing with it, even when taught to use the same tools. So, there is trial & error in finding what works best for that child & how they best work with their condition. The biggest thing, is learning to ignore (or at least using common sense to examine what they say) the so-called experts (I actually had to do this when I was in school, teaching myself to deal with my ADHD). Over ther years, I have read so many tips, ideas, and pieces of advice, from 'experts,' that are really just ways to avoid the issue. I've seen experts suggest that people with ADHD just use disposable dishes & silverware, so they don't have to worry about remembering to wash them. I've seen other pieces of advice that are just as ridiculous, for ADHD, Bipolar, and other conditions. So, I had to accept that my experiences are more important than the opinions of the 'experts' when it comes to me & my family. Most people don't want to do that, though. They can't let go of the idea that the 'experts' know more than the average person.

I know in my heart that there is a difference of processing for my son. I can't pin point it. I have had him tested a couple times for various things and each time he's borderline, but not enough traits to fit this or that box. I can see his differences, yet others (outsiders) don't see the slight differences in his thought process or reasons for his actions, most people think he is just a happy, smart, funny kid who beats to his own drum. There are many times though, that I can see his frustration, because people don't understand him and they just ignore his attempts to let them know they didn't get it. (if that makes sense?) I don't worry about him not fitting into society as an adult, because later in life we find we are all quirky to some degree here and there in our own ways. We find a way that fits our quirkiness and life is good. HOWEVER, the path from infancy to adult is paved with schooling, friendships, life lessons, etc...and to find the box that is the least uncomfortable for him would be nice. I feel finding out what exactly is his processing "thing" would be helpful, because I could read what the "experts" say...yet I agree 100% that you have to weed thru that 'expert' advice and trust yourself and what you see working with your child.

I suspect dyslexia because my husband suffered as a child with it. I also ponder mild (very high functioning) asperbergers, because some of the behaviors common to aspies seem to fit some of the behaviors we can't figure out how to help him with. Unexpected disappointments are massive melt downs (ie that would be his trigger) If he has some warning on the possiblity of a disappointment before it happens (ie Grandpa may not want to play that game with you, what are you going to do if that is the case?...he comes up with answers and even though the disappointment is there, he can handle it...yet if I don't prep him for that, and Grandpa says not now, maybe later, it's like a two year old's tantrum) THAT behavior has gotten a LOT better since we pulled from school and started homeschooling. Yet it still happens occasionally. We have a deal now, if he goes all day without unexpected disappointment tantrums, then he can earn a little computer time. (screens attract him as do fantasy stuff..pokemon, dragons, etc...) Maybe ADHD? The family doctor doesn't think ADHD though, he thinks gifted and bored, because he can focus for long periods of time if it's his own choice/interest. (ie KUMON puts out fairly thick books of fun problems...mazes, word search, etc...my son had a maze one and when he realized there was a certificate in the back after you accomplished all the mazes, he did the whole maze book in one sitting, so he could have the certificate in the back) If I could figure out a 'goal' for handwriting I might have some luck there! LOL :)

Anyhow, back on topic....I'm very curious to hear what you think of the supplies you are getting and what you think of them. :)

laundrycrisis
04-25-2011, 12:15 PM
So, I had to accept that my experiences are more important than the opinions of the 'experts' when it comes to me & my family. Most people don't want to do that, though. They can't let go of the idea that the 'experts' know more than the average person.


Yes, yes, yes, amen ! So very true. Anything any "expert" tells us should be measured against our own expertise about our own children.

higgledypiggledy
04-26-2011, 04:56 PM
The OG method is effective in helping with dyslexia. It uses physical movement to help children sequence sounds in the order they are written. I actually think that the principle of using physical movement to help organize information is important whether a child is dyslexic or not. Muscle memory is POWERFUL. To mc2andz, I'm wondering how old your son is. The list of numbers and letters you mentioned causing problems is considered pretty normal for kids through 2-3 grade. In other words, most average kids without dyslexia will still flip those glyphs occasionally. I think ps sometimes makes this out to be a developmental problem that requires special attention because they get extra $ for children recieving special services. From a brain perspective, it isn't uncommon and for most kids goes away on its own over time. If it persists to the point that the flip is still consistant almost all the time after age 9-10 I might seek evaluation especially if there were other indicators. I myself struggle with dyslexia that pertains specifically to numbers. It isn't something that has had too much of a negative impact. YIKES--some courses at uni were dreadful but by then I had coping strategies and always saw my profs immediately. For example, I only know two phone numbers, my childhood number and my mother's cell phone number (which I know be muscle memory not sequence). I miswrite numbers all the time and cannot have someone tell me a number sequence and correctly write it. I cannot copy a number sequence correctly from one page to another. I must check and recheck any work involving numbers. Thank goodness I had a dad who knew how to work with me to come up with effective strategies to correctly transmit and interpret number sequences.

laundrycrisis
04-26-2011, 05:49 PM
The OG method is effective in helping with dyslexia. It uses physical movement to help children sequence sounds in the order they are written. I actually think that the principle of using physical movement to help organize information is important whether a child is dyslexic or not. Muscle memory is POWERFUL.

I think muscle memory/kinesthetic memory is why typing is helping our son so much with spelling words that are non-phonetic or that require more "advanced" phonics rules. He cannot remember the order of letters in a word by hearing it spelled over and over; or by writing it over and over; or by seeing the word. The sequential visualization exercises have helped him some. But what has helped him the most is learning to type by touch, and then typing words and sequenced numbers correctly. That nails it down for him. And in some ways this is my spelling/memorization strategy too. I may not remember how to spell a word, but if I quickly "type it in the air", I can spell it. Same with phone numbers - I can pretend to dial them and then I will remember them.

Dutchbabiesx2
04-26-2011, 06:11 PM
Some parts of "dyslexia" and are visual processing issues and some are auditory processing issues. And some are central language, sequential memory, and other memory issues. Orton Gillingham is an intensive phonics approach. It is most helpful for students whose issues are mostly auditory - they have trouble with letters representing sounds and combinations of letters being interpreted as sounds with phonics rules. When I was researching dyslexia I noticed that some dyslexia "experts" are totally focused on phonics-related issues and try to define this exact problem as dyslexia, and many "dyslexia" programs are almost completely geared toward phonics. This narrow definition of and approach to dyslexia is completely unhelpful for a person whose dyslexia is not related to auditory issues. If you do a search on "dyseidetic dyslexia" you will get some different viewpoints on dyslexia. Here is one:

http://dyslexia.learninginfo.org/dyseidetic.htm



Just wanted to second this . . .it takes 9 steps to process visual information and dyslexia can occure at any point along that path. Along with visual processing, my son has Central auditory processing- in a noisy room his brain does not prioritize speech and thus leads to a lot of confusion and misunderstanding. I think he also has other areas because when he tries to spell out a word, he spells it the way he thinks he hears it!
I don't know any more than that, but I hope you find some great help!