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zette
03-27-2011, 01:54 PM
My 5.5 yo son has been diagnosed with Aspergers, and has fine motor issues. We began homeschooling 1 day/wk in January in order to get the school district to cover speech and OT for him, and plan for him to enter public school kindergarten in the fall. I've been using the pre-K level HWT, and have successfully corrected his grip from a fist to a good 3-point. He's finished all the wet-dry-try letters and the pre-K workbook and we'll start the K workbook next week. I think he's making reasonable progress -- individual letters are recognizable.

Whenever he draws or paints, it's still just random scribbles, and recently for the first time he made the observation that his drawings don't look like anything. I don't think he has the concept of how to draw a picture.

I think that in K there are a lot of assignments where you're told to draw something -- a picture from a story, things related to science or social studies, etc -- and at this point I know it would just be scribbles.

Any ideas on how to help develop this skill? I'm going to bring it up with his OT -- she divides her time about half and half between sensory issues and fine motor, and has mostly been doing things like mazes and some HWT practice during his sessions.

dbmamaz
03-27-2011, 02:57 PM
I used a book called "Drawing with children" or something like that, but it was actually a total failure for me. I"m thinking, tho, that you should start by just drawing simple shapes and getting him to copy them - lines, circles, squares, triangles. Then work on pictures you can easily make by putting shapes together. A house is a square with a triangle on top. I dont know if there is a curriculum like that, but it might help him get the idea.

SueEllen Grieves-Curl
03-27-2011, 04:34 PM
The basics of drawing is the use of shapes. If he knows all of his shapes you can help him break down everything into it's shape. ie a bird is an oval with a circle for the head. than you add a cone for the beak and circle for the eyes. the only things left are the wings and the feet. Almost everything can be done in this fashion. And if he learns to draw in this way adding detail is all that is left. It also helps with math later on.

Jeni
03-28-2011, 02:37 AM
My dd is 7 and can hardly draw/color/paint to save her life. She just learned how to draw a stick figure. It's really sad. She came home today from a painting class thing that she went to with a friend. She hands me this "painting" with scary movie black scribbles all over it. This is supposed to be Easter related mind you. Scared the crap out of me, my mind racing wondering if there was something wrong with her. She said it was just for practice and the real one will be ready next week - *deep breath*. But my gosh my heart stopped thinking this is what was in my child's head regarding churchly Easter stuff. I am scared to see what she really painted.

Anyway, our plan is to start her in online art and music classes via K12. She is so behind in these areas and it's something I can't teach myself. Nor do we have time to invest in another out of the house activity. So we shall see.

hockeymom
03-28-2011, 05:13 AM
My 8 yo can't draw either. We recently discovered Ed Emberley and he loves using his books. The whole concept is dissecting a drawing into its various shapes and drawing each shape one at a time. It breaks down something complex (and by that I mean complex for kids who can't draw intuitively) like a race car or an elephant into a series of simple steps. Whenever he gets the urge to draw, which had never happened until we found these books, he gets his Ed Emberely out to help him. I feel awful that he can't do it on his own, but using the books give him so much more confidence. I'm hoping eventually it will come together for him.

Here's a link to our favorite book: Ed Emberley Making a World (http://www.amazon.com/Ed-Emberleys-Drawing-Book-World/dp/0316789720/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1301303476&sr=8-1)

HTH

farrarwilliams
03-28-2011, 08:08 AM
We have a couple of the books from the series Doodles for Lunch, Doodles for Dinner... My kids have enjoyed those. Also, we have the Usborne Big Books of Things to Draw which has also been a good source of inspiration for my kids. And there's the online Mark Kistler's (http://www.draw3d.com/OnlineVideo.html)drawing lessons. They cost money, but there's a large number of free ones to do as well. And I second the Ed Emberley suggestion. Oh, and we went a couple of years ago to a big exhibit of David Macauley's art so just reading his books might be a good way to introduce the idea of perspective.

Finally, for cheering up a sad young artist, you absolutely must read the picture book The Dot by Peter Reynolds! It's just lovely. He has another one with a similar theme called Ish which is also great.

I'm not an amazing artist myself :p - but I feel like it's probably a balance between letting kids explore, do scribbles, doodle patterns and attempt abstract assignments in whatever way seems right to them and actually showing them how to put a box and a triangle together to make a representation of a "house."

dbmamaz
03-28-2011, 10:20 AM
fwiw, my 7 yo ONLY draws pictures of stick-figures having battles, complete w weapons and blood.

ravinlunachick
03-31-2011, 10:12 PM
I just started using Draw Write Now (http://www.drawyourworld.com/drawwrite.html) with my nearly 7yo dd (serious fine motor issues). I feel comfortable using the handwriting/copywork portion, but if you wanted, you could easily just use the drawings.

Pilgrim
04-01-2011, 03:55 PM
The basics of drawing is the use of shapes. If he knows all of his shapes you can help him break down everything into it's shape. ie a bird is an oval with a circle for the head. than you add a cone for the beak and circle for the eyes. the only things left are the wings and the feet. Almost everything can be done in this fashion. And if he learns to draw in this way adding detail is all that is left. It also helps with math later on.

I agree. My 5 yo isn't fond of drawing, but when I encourage him to use shapes to 'build' pictures, he does better and has more fun with it. He's just started to make recognizable pictures -- not that realism is the end-all-be-all of art. We've also talked about conveying emotion through color and line, and just diving into the paint and seeing what happens. I'd certainly praise any artistic effort whether it's realistic or not.


fwiw, my 7 yo ONLY draws pictures of stick-figures having battles, complete w weapons and blood.

lol...sounds like me...countless 'battle scenes' DD's art always includes a fairy.

zette
04-01-2011, 10:52 PM
The occupational therapist recommended that I start by making simple drawings with a highlighter, and having him trace them. Next, start the drawing, and then have him finish it -- I draw a spider body, he draws the legs, I draw a truck, he adds the wheels, etc.

jess
04-02-2011, 12:30 PM
I just started using Draw Write Now (http://www.drawyourworld.com/drawwrite.html) with my nearly 7yo dd (serious fine motor issues). I feel comfortable using the handwriting/copywork portion, but if you wanted, you could easily just use the drawings.
That was my thought, too.

farrarwilliams
04-02-2011, 01:37 PM
The occupational therapist recommended that I start by making simple drawings with a highlighter, and having him trace them. Next, start the drawing, and then have him finish it -- I draw a spider body, he draws the legs, I draw a truck, he adds the wheels, etc.

That's similar to the whole doodles craze, you know. Have you seen the Taro Gomi Doodles coloring book? Or the Oodles of Doodles book? Those are both finish the doodle sort of things that you might could do together. You know, if you, yourself, needed some inspiration.