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Ariadne
03-24-2011, 01:42 PM
...especially in the media? Pilgrim's Do you homeschool to escape government intervention? (http://www.secularhomeschool.com/threads/2880-Do-you-homeschool-to-escape-government-intervention) thread got me wondering how widespread homeschooling stereotypes are and wondering if secular homeschoolers are visible in other people's communities.

What examples of homeschoolers do you see in your state and local media?

How about your neighbors, etc - do they think we're all _____? (Religious? Republicans? Conspiracy theorists? Crunchy? Rebels? Whathaveyou?)

dottieanna29
03-24-2011, 02:03 PM
The majority of homeschoolers I see/know here in NJ seem to be homeschooling due to learning disabilities. When the stereotype about religious homeschoolers was mentioned at a gathering, a few moms were actually surprised to hear it. They didn't even realize that in some parts of the country the religious/fundamentalist type homeschoolers were the majority.

Laina
03-24-2011, 02:05 PM
DH and I have been telling people about our decision to homeschool in the past couple of weeks, and I've noticed a difference between the reactions of men and women. Women have been pretty positive, and some mothers say they have read about it or considered it, and most of the men are more taken aback and mention the problem of socialization. I think this may come from women just being more aware of homeschooling as an option and interested in education-related things, and the men just not having thought about it much. I haven't run into much stereotyping except from a neighbor who is Christian and said she can always pick the homeschool kids out of the crowd at her church.

Edited to add--I think she meant that in a negative way, like they stick out because of awkwardness or funny clothes or something.

h5rus
03-24-2011, 02:35 PM
I have yet to find a secular homeschool family in my area. And it's made things very hard for us -all the co-ops, get-togethers, etc. are very religious-based. So I guess if you tell someone you homeschool and live in my area, it's pretty certain that they believe you're a Christian.

Ariadne
03-24-2011, 02:38 PM
The majority of homeschoolers I see/know here in NJ seem to be homeschooling due to learning disabilities. When the stereotype about religious homeschoolers was mentioned at a gathering, a few moms were actually surprised to hear it. They didn't even realize that in some parts of the country the religious/fundamentalist type homeschoolers were the majority.I've read that's the fastest-growing reason to homeschool: disabilities/health problems/severe allergies.


DH and I have been telling people about our decision to homeschool in the past couple of weeks, and I've noticed a difference between the reactions of men and women. Women have been pretty positive, and some mothers say they have read about it or considered it, and most of the men are more taken aback and mention the problem of socialization. I think this may come from women just being more aware of homeschooling as an option and interested in education-related things, and the men just not having thought about it much. I haven't run into much stereotyping except from a neighbor who is Christian and said she can always pick the homeschool kids out of the crowd at her church.

Edited to add--I think she meant that in a negative way, like they stick out because of awkwardness or funny clothes or something.You mean they have their own thoughts about fashion? And they have interests that didn't come from a cookie cutter? :rolleyes:

I noticed that both of you are in New England. I used to live in Texas and the religious stereotype covered a lot of accurate territory. So far up here in the Midwest I could almost say the same thing, but not quite as much. That might just be my corner of the woods or my personal experience, though.

hockeymom
03-24-2011, 02:44 PM
I don't think there is a general impression of homeschoolers in our area. I'm sure it's assumed that we homeschool for religious reasons, but that's a favorable impression around here. I think more people would be offended if they knew we are not religious, but of course I don't talk to the supermarket cashiers about it. No one seems to care, anyway. There aren't many of us around, secular or religious, and it isn't openly discussed.

albeto
03-24-2011, 02:47 PM
How about your neighbors, etc - do they think we're all _____? (Religious? Republicans? Conspiracy theorists? Crunchy? Rebels? Whathaveyou?)

Crunchy, tree-huggin', stickin'-it-to-the-man or enlightened freethinkers.

I don't think my town has a Christian homeschooling group outside specific churches. My local group is secular/inclusive and we have members who are Jewish, Christian, pagan, Hindu (maybe?) and mostly atheists. The closest city to me has an unschooling group, and pagan and crunchy would be the stereotype I think represents them the most.

Laina
03-24-2011, 03:03 PM
I've read that's the fastest-growing reason to homeschool: disabilities/health problems/severe allergies.

You mean they have their own thoughts about fashion? And they have interests that didn't come from a cookie cutter? :rolleyes:

I noticed that both of you are in New England. I used to live in Texas and the religious stereotype covered a lot of accurate territory. So far up here in the Midwest I could almost say the same thing, but not quite as much. That might just be my corner of the woods or my personal experience, though.

We are homeschooling partly for medical reasons--dd has type 1 diabetes. I'm not sure if I would have thought of homeschooling if it wasn't for diabetes. I'm guessing that still over half of the homeschoolers around here in my neck of the woods are homeschooling for religious reasons, but there are plenty who are not religious too.

Riceball_Mommy
03-24-2011, 03:09 PM
I've only seen homeschooling mentioned once on the local news in recent memory, of course I don't watch the news much so it might be on there more I don't know. Anyway the story wasn't directly related to homeschooling, it was mostly talking about unhealthy conditions in home kitchens, and how people get sick from eating at home. It showed one family who homeschools and talked about the increased chances of her kids getting sick, and the mother of course seemed concerned. It bugged me because this guy goes into this not so tidy, kitchen and starts making eggs, of course he doesn't do it like a competent person he's like one of those egg cracking machine infomercials, dripping egg everywhere and not cleaning it up. All I was thinking is, if you have a filthy kitchen, and fling raw food about of course your going to get sick but who really does that? Also are you trying to imply that homeschoolers are all that filthy? I think I was reading too much into it with the last part, but I'm sure someone else out there thought that too.

QueenBee
03-24-2011, 03:20 PM
Crunchy, tree-huggin', stickin'-it-to-the-man or enlightened freethinkers.

I don't think my town has a Christian homeschooling group outside specific churches. My local group is secular/inclusive and we have members who are Jewish, Christian, pagan, Hindu (maybe?) and mostly atheists. The closest city to me has an unschooling group, and pagan and crunchy would be the stereotype I think represents them the most.

How do I move to your area??!?!?! Mine is the exact opposite... I would have to finish the sentence: religious (as in fundamental Christian), republican, right-wing, etc. I think it's generally assumed we fit that description, and we do not fit that mold at all. It has been tough. It's not that the groups around us have different points of view from my family, and it's not even that they aren't inclusive - fine, have your own group, I get it... It's that they openly oppose people with different views. There a sports program starting near us, and it says "open to all homeschoolers." Then I talked to some of the moms and asked point blank about the religious aspect. It wasn't a fun conversation, and one mom even said that she didn't want "Wiccan devil worshipers" there. Uh, yeah. Not the group for us.

Firefly_Mom
03-24-2011, 03:30 PM
We live in an area with A LOT of secular homeschoolers, but people unfamiliar with homeschooling still assume that we're all religious. Still, I can think of only 2 overtly religious groups in the area, though I'm sure there are more. They just aren't on my radar. Most of the groups in the area are inclusive, and there's even a Pagan one.

For the most part, people in the community are very supportive. I'm sure a lot of it has to do with the sheer number of us. The only problem I've faced is encountering local businesses who DON'T want to do business with us - not because of the kids, but because they've had bad experiences with some homeschool parents. I can't say that I blame them. I've met some REALLY obnoxious parents! LOL

kewb22
03-24-2011, 03:53 PM
Most people around my area of NJ think all homeschoolers must be religious nuts but then they meet me and realize that it is not true. I do meet a fair amount of homeschoolers who are doing it because of medical or special needs.

dbmamaz
03-24-2011, 04:35 PM
Well, I have had people assume i'm a fundie when I say i'm homeschooling . . . but i'm pretty isolated, so I dont know exactly what the 'stereotype' is here . . . but remember, I live in the state which is home to HSLDA . . . so i'm thinking big-time xtian thing.

StartingOver
03-24-2011, 04:42 PM
Texas Bible Belt here. But there are a few of us out there that don't homeschool for religious reasons.

Hampchick
03-24-2011, 05:12 PM
Although the larger homeschool groups are religious based, I have the feeling there are a large number of homeschoolers that aren't affiliated with a group. We live in a hippie, ultra-liberal area in a liberal state. I have yet to have anyone tell me that they assume we homeschool for religious reasons.

Accidental Homeschooler
03-24-2011, 06:06 PM
When I was reading the local library's collection of hs books I found, "Kingdom of Children:Culture and Controversy in the Homeschooling Movement", by Mitchell L Stevens (2001). He goes into great detail about the history of how conservative Christians became the face of hsing after being started by John Holt types. It is an excellent read and was especially interesting after all the "why you should" and "how to" hs books. I have moved on to the history of school reform and Paul E Peterson, in "Saving Schools: From Horace Mann to Virtual Learning," covers hsing as part of a larger school choice movement and is also a very good read. I especially enjoyed finding out that Horace Mann homeschooled his children, or at least his wife Mary did. I think that should go on a bumper sticker, "Horace Mann was a Homeschooler!"

belacqua
03-24-2011, 06:13 PM
Our whole town is pretty crunchy, and the homeschoolers even more so (we once went on a field trip and my son calculated that 40% of the kids there were named after either a figure in Greek/Roman/Norse mythology or an herb). We have a substantial population of Christian homeschoolers, but most of them are granola types, too.

higgledypiggledy
03-24-2011, 06:43 PM
I think people we know in academic circles assume we do it because we want a thorough and useful education for our children. People in the general population assume we're religious or think the schools are physically dangerous. We live in a metropoplitan area and the physical danger would be a valid concern in some schools.

Stella M
03-24-2011, 07:01 PM
Yes, we are stereotyped here. You are either a whacko religious h/s'er trying to protect your children from the heathen state or raising prodigies who are so far advanced of their peers they 'have' to be h's'ed. There are very few secular hs'ers visible here b/c there are very few secular hs'ers and the ones there are, like me, have to be uber low key about their beliefs if they want their children to have any kind of community. No-one I associate with in the h/s community knows I'm an atheist for example.

Ariadne
03-24-2011, 07:55 PM
we once went on a field trip and my son calculated that 40% of the kids there were named after either a figure in Greek/Roman/Norse mythology or an herbFunniest thing I've read all day.


Yes, we are stereotyped here. You are either a whacko religious h/s'er trying to protect your children from the heathen state or raising prodigies who are so far advanced of their peers they 'have' to be h's'ed. There are very few secular hs'ers visible here b/c there are very few secular hs'ers and the ones there are, like me, have to be uber low key about their beliefs if they want their children to have any kind of community. No-one I associate with in the h/s community knows I'm an atheist for example.Ditto, though that's changing. I am just starting to become involved with a local secular group. But all of the homeschoolers I see regularly don't know. For the sake of my children I don't say a word because otherwise they wouldn't have any friends nearby.

Stella M
03-24-2011, 08:01 PM
Crazy, isn't it, having to be a closet atheist! I love your sig quote btw Natalie. We have an atheist PM atm, which you think would make it more acceptable but no, it just seems to bring out the vitriol.

On the subject of names - my son has a rather Biblical name ( obviously, not for biblical reasons! ) and it really baffles people we meet b/c they assume we are religious. It's kind of funny to see them trying to work us out :)

wife&mommy
03-24-2011, 08:21 PM
While most people you meet just out and about assume we are homeschooling either for religious reasons or just because we are insanely overprotective, we do have an all inclusive homeschooling group. So the outsiders I think do stereotype but there are a fair number of us in the community that have support. :)

farrarwilliams
03-24-2011, 09:27 PM
No real stereotypes here. I mean, some people come to the table with them, but the homeschool community here is pretty diverse and runs the gamut from unschooling hippies to right wing fundamentalists and everything in between and forks in the road thereof. Most of the local media items here about homeschooling are general interest pieces that run as filler when the papers clearly have nothing else to say about anything (you know, "School is Starting Again... but Not for Everyone!" or "Homeschooling Trend is Growing!" kind of evergreen stuff). The homeschoolers in them are usually portrayed as secular (as in, religion is usually not mentioned, though I'm sure sometimes the families are actually religious).

AddlepatedMonkeyMama
03-24-2011, 09:38 PM
I have no idea how homeschoolers are viewed here. It's a liberal state where there are plenty of non-churchgoing families, so I'm guessing they think we're just weirdos. :)

I just found out, by combing through some school committee meeting minutes, that my town has 41 homeschooling families. That comes out to about 8 families per square mile. The house next door is going on the market next month--who wants to be family #42?????

dottieanna29
03-24-2011, 09:47 PM
No real stereotypes here. I mean, some people come to the table with them, but the homeschool community here is pretty diverse and runs the gamut from unschooling hippies to right wing fundamentalists and everything in between and forks in the road thereof. Most of the local media items here about homeschooling are general interest pieces that run as filler when the papers clearly have nothing else to say about anything (you know, "School is Starting Again... but Not for Everyone!" or "Homeschooling Trend is Growing!" kind of evergreen stuff). The homeschoolers in them are usually portrayed as secular (as in, religion is usually not mentioned, though I'm sure sometimes the families are actually religious).

These are the kind of articles we see around here too. That and the big one about the girls at the local gymnastics studio "homeschooling" so they can spend more time at the gym preparing for the National teams. They hire a tutor to come in and use a public school at home-type curriculum.

Religion just doesn't seem to be a big topic of discussion around here outside of church. We have many, many different religions - a very large Hindu/Muslim population in the next town over, many Jewish families, Catholics are probably some of the most numerous Christians (a lot of Irish and Hispanic), many Atheists and "Easter/Christmas Christians". I know a handful of what I would consider Fundamentalist Christians (from my Mom's Club) but they tend to be pretty quiet.

Edited to add: And of course, NJ does have it's Conservative counties but overall it's a pretty liberal state.

Dutchbabiesx2
03-24-2011, 10:57 PM
We are pretty lucky here. There are several neighbors who HS, some for religious and other just because they can. The other 'because they can' have older kids so we don't interact much. Many people who learned of our HSing were either former HSers themselves or have seriously considered it. Many of my PS friends think more and more about it, but no one sees the advantages of seeing your kids all day, the just think of seeing their kids all day! I also really like our local Secular HS group, there are some of the religious persuasion, but it is more something they do as a fam and not part of the discussions.
The first time I met some mom's from the HS group there was a woman there going on about not teaching her kids about Dinosaurs. She left soon after and the other moms could not set the record straight fast enough, she was not part of the group just someone from the local adjunct program.
We hope to do some European travel soon, but in the past when we've been there before their school gets out, no one bothers- must be my strong american look ;)

MarkInMD
03-25-2011, 12:00 AM
We live in a mostly conservative (rural) area of a generally liberal (urban) state (Maryland). That being said, if we mention that we homeschool, or if someone asks where our kids go to school and we tell them, religion is not the first thing they seem to question. They just want to know why we decided to do it and how we can swing it, plus what is required of us. We tend to run in more progressive circles, though, so I don't know that many of the people asking us are particularly religious. "The children must be socialized!" comes up about half the time, too, but we have answers for that at the ready.

I have to share that recently I received the best initial response to my answer of "We homeschool" from an older fellow who happens to be British but lives in our area. He got a smile on his face and said, "Good for you!" Then he proceeded to pepper me with questions about testing, progress reports, and all sorts of things, of course. :)

hockeymom
03-25-2011, 06:19 AM
I have no idea how homeschoolers are viewed here. It's a liberal state where there are plenty of non-churchgoing families, so I'm guessing they think we're just weirdos. :)

I just found out, by combing through some school committee meeting minutes, that my town has 41 homeschooling families. That comes out to about 8 families per square mile. The house next door is going on the market next month--who wants to be family #42?????

*Raising hand and waving it frantically in the air*

Me me me! Pick me!

:)

Wilma
03-25-2011, 09:19 AM
Bible Belt here. There seems to be a perception that people homeschool for religious reasons because the schools here are pretty good in our town. And then, if you are religious, you seem to be of the I want to protect my children at all costs Harry Potter will send you to hell let's all get purity rings mentality. However, and I find this interesting, a lot of people I knew a few years ago who were uptight like that and I just didn't associate with but I have now had contact with again, have loosened up. They seem to realize that their dogmaticism (is that a word?) is unsustainable and was pushing their kids away. They were blindsided when they got out in the real world. And of course, keeping too much from your kids, IMO, will often backfire. Forbidden fruit syndrome. Not all of them, and it seems the die hards are digging in the heels even more, but I am noticing a subtle change.

I used to go to activities and sit quietly, nod my head, smile serenely and wonder how many felt the way I did and were afraid to speak up.

outskirtsofbs
03-25-2011, 12:32 PM
Not that I know of.......I still haven't seen any of them yet. And the town only has 4200 people. I think they are the bun heads (?)--I think thats what someone on this forum referred to them as. Those ladies that never cut their hair and shun jeans. There are so many "crazies" here, I don't think homeschoolers are viewed as different.

Jeni
03-25-2011, 12:46 PM
Oh yes, very religious around here. I have never been questioned but I think most people just assume we do it for religious reasons. I let them believe that at this point.

rumbledolly
03-25-2011, 01:43 PM
I have yet to meet a "local" who is HS'ing for any other reason than religious. Everyone we run into assumes it's religious. Someone asked me yesterday why I HS and I said "my child bites people" with my DD standing right there. My DD laughed as she got the joke, thank DOG, and she growled and showed her teeth. Thankfully the person who asked me had been speaking to me for a few minutes and she "got" that I was kidding.

It's actually because I bite, sniff glue, and have fits of random sarcasm.

I long for the day I run into someone just like me/us who wants to go looking for neat seashells at the beach or animals in the woods and doesn't mention it's all a gift from God. I don't even care if they just want to meet at the local coffee shop and read tabloid magazines about the alien baby Elvis and Liberace had.............

Ariadne
03-25-2011, 02:02 PM
Bible Belt here. There seems to be a perception that people homeschool for religious reasons because the schools here are pretty good in our town. And then, if you are religious, you seem to be of the I want to protect my children at all costs Harry Potter will send you to hell let's all get purity rings mentality.
I have seen some of the same here. We have a high-scoring school district here with a lot of involved parents, so when someone finds out you homeschool they are usually just stunned. The looks on their faces are priceless. You can just hear the brain stammer, "But but but but but" if you listen hard enough.




However, and I find this interesting, a lot of people I knew a few years ago who were uptight like that and I just didn't associate with but I have now had contact with again, have loosened up. They seem to realize that their dogmaticism (is that a word?) is unsustainable and was pushing their kids away. They were blindsided when they got out in the real world. And of course, keeping too much from your kids, IMO, will often backfire. Forbidden fruit syndrome. Not all of them, and it seems the die hards are digging in the heels even more, but I am noticing a subtle change.
Oh this is exciting to hear. I have a friend who refers to this experience within the homeschool community as the "Christian ghetto", as in "Let's provide everything for ourselves within our own self-defined and self-created niche." It's wonderful to hear of someone witnessing some groups breaking at least a little free of that. I have always felt rather sad for their kids.



I used to go to activities and sit quietly, nod my head, smile serenely and wonder how many felt the way I did and were afraid to speak up.
Oh, yeah. I do understand this.


I have yet to meet a "local" who is HS'ing for any other reason than religious. Everyone we run into assumes it's religious. Someone asked me yesterday why I HS and I said "my child bites people" with my DD standing right there. My DD laughed as she got the joke, thank DOG, and she growled and showed her teeth. Thankfully the person who asked me had been speaking to me for a few minutes and she "got" that I was kidding.
I love it! I'd enjoy meeting you.


It's actually because I bite, sniff glue, and have fits of random sarcasm.
Me, too. And my daughter shows signs of inheriting these tendencies. Makes me proud. <sniff>


I long for the day I run into someone just like me/us who wants to go looking for neat seashells at the beach or animals in the woods and doesn't mention it's all a gift from God. I don't even care if they just want to meet at the local coffee shop and read tabloid magazines about the alien baby Elvis and Liberace had.............*snort*

You mean Elvis and Liberace had a baby? <innocent look>

fullofquirks
03-25-2011, 02:10 PM
People automatically assume it's because you are a fundie around here in northern Fl. That's certainly not the case with us but sometimes it's just easier to let them be happy with their assumptions.

ravinlunachick
03-31-2011, 11:20 PM
Ha! I live only a few miles from Bob Jones University, if that tells you anything. I know that there *are* secular homeschoolers here, but we are a seriously small minority. I know one other nonreligious hs'er, and that's only because I've posted with her for years on a breastfeeding/crunchy parenting type message board.

MrsLOLcat
04-01-2011, 01:51 PM
We live in an area with A LOT of secular homeschoolers, but people unfamiliar with homeschooling still assume that we're all religious. [cut edit here]

For the most part, people in the community are very supportive. I'm sure a lot of it has to do with the sheer number of us. The only problem I've faced is encountering local businesses who DON'T want to do business with us - not because of the kids, but because they've had bad experiences with some homeschool parents. I can't say that I blame them. I've met some REALLY obnoxious parents! LOL

Ditto. Though several secular parents I know are tea party members. They're great folks, but I don't swing that far over, either. There are definitely a lot of HSers in this state; almost everyone I know or mention HSing to knows at least one person who was homeschooled or currently is homeschooling.

Wabi Sabi
04-01-2011, 03:34 PM
I live in an extremely liberal town within a conservative state, so we get the full spectrum of homeschoolers here. Lots of hippie, anarchist, stick-it-to-the-man unschoolers balanced out by plenty of denim-jumper wearing conservative, fundamentalist Christians.

Ariadne
04-01-2011, 07:11 PM
I live in an extremely liberal town within a conservative state, so we get the full spectrum of homeschoolers here. Lots of hippie, anarchist, stick-it-to-the-man unschoolers balanced out by plenty of denim-jumper wearing conservative, fundamentalist Christians.Oh I bet that's interesting. What are the local groups like: fairly mixed or self-segregated?

Martha
04-01-2011, 07:28 PM
I'm in the buckle of the Protestant belt. Being Catholic is marginally better than being a complete heathen.:p. (bc don't you know we worship idols?:rolleyes:

The majority here presume you are fundie Christians. They are surprised I don't wear a denim jumper and believe in being a submissive wife (or anything:cool:).

But it is slowly changing. There are starting to be a very few small alternative home school support groups cropping up. They don't get much advertising space tho since most of the home school sources of information for the state are run by Protestant associations.

OrganicFrmGrl
04-01-2011, 10:11 PM
I am new to our area as well as to Homeschooling. I do however believe that the majority of the people here probably do it for religious reasons. This area seems to be extremely religious! I don't know how many times I have been asked if I have found a "home church" yet. We have also been invited to many churches and have politely declined! Being new I sometimes feel I am in a difficult situation because we are already the outsiders and then to add we don't go to church and are not homeschooling for religious reasons may send this small WV town into a tailspin! I hope the longer we are here we find some secular homeschoolers!

belacqua
04-01-2011, 10:49 PM
I am new to our area as well as to Homeschooling. I do however believe that the majority of the people here probably do it for religious reasons. This area seems to be extremely religious! I don't know how many times I have been asked if I have found a "home church" yet. We have also been invited to many churches and have politely declined! Being new I sometimes feel I am in a difficult situation because we are already the outsiders and then to add we don't go to church and are not homeschooling for religious reasons may send this small WV town into a tailspin! I hope the longer we are here we find some secular homeschoolers!

The first time somebody asked me that I embarrassed myself thoroughly. I thought "home church" was like "homeschool." Nifty idea, really, I thought. We discuss religions all the time as part of history and literature study, so I said I would look into it. Then she asked which ones I was considering, and I didn't understand (and compounded the problem by mumbling something like, "Well, all of them, I suppose"), and then she didn't understand, and it was just awkward and weird. She still avoids me, I think. Can't say I blame her.

dbmamaz
04-01-2011, 11:12 PM
LOL thats awesome Bela! My most similar situation was at the pool, when my son had befriended someone, and we went to exchange contact info - the boy's mom started waxing romantically about how much the boys have in common. I was totally puzzled. Video games? Eventually she went on to talking about how her freinds are all so suprised that she doesnt home school, because so many of the families at her church do, but she just hasnt felt 'called' to do it. I finally figured out wtf was going on.

luvmybaby333
04-01-2011, 11:29 PM
I think they are often stereotyped as over-protective Christians. Which isn't far from the truth when it comes to most of the homeschooling population in our area. (There aren't many people at all in this area that would admit to not being Christian... public schooling and homeschooling alike.) I'm sure there are other (negative) stereotypes... but I never hear them from the general public. In fact, most people only say nice things about homeschooling to my face. Though, many of them do seem to assume that we home school for religious reasons.

Ariadne
04-02-2011, 01:18 AM
I'm in the buckle of the Protestant belt. Being Catholic is marginally better than being a complete heathen.:p. (bc don't you know we worship idols?:rolleyes:Oh it's hard being a Catholic in the bible belt. BTDT! Yeah, they worship Mary, idols, and don't read the bible. < roll eyes >


I am new to our area as well as to Homeschooling. I do however believe that the majority of the people here probably do it for religious reasons. This area seems to be extremely religious! I don't know how many times I have been asked if I have found a "home church" yet. We have also been invited to many churches and have politely declined! Being new I sometimes feel I am in a difficult situation because we are already the outsiders and then to add we don't go to church and are not homeschooling for religious reasons may send this small WV town into a tailspin! I hope the longer we are here we find some secular homeschoolers!Ohhhh WV? Tough call. I spent most of my childhood there.

Pm'ing you.


The first time somebody asked me that I embarrassed myself thoroughly. I thought "home church" was like "homeschool." Nifty idea, really, I thought. We discuss religions all the time as part of history and literature study, so I said I would look into it. Then she asked which ones I was considering, and I didn't understand (and compounded the problem by mumbling something like, "Well, all of them, I suppose"), and then she didn't understand, and it was just awkward and weird. She still avoids me, I think. Can't say I blame her.Oh, this is a good story.


I think they are often stereotyped as over-protective Christians. Which isn't far from the truth when it comes to most of the homeschooling population in our area. (There aren't many people at all in this area that would admit to not being Christian... public schooling and homeschooling alike.) I'm sure there are other (negative) stereotypes... but I never hear them from the general public. In fact, most people only say nice things about homeschooling to my face. Though, many of them do seem to assume that we home school for religious reasons.I love your sig line about your 2-1/2 yo daughter! So cute.

MarkInMD
04-02-2011, 11:50 AM
We might as well be WV, as I can see it a couple miles away from my front porch. I can sympathize.