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View Full Version : Hey, BrendaE do Swedes really cook their noodles in milk?



Pefa
03-08-2011, 11:05 PM
ES introduced me to the pleasures (?) of regular ordinary mealtime. We were both struck by the odd to us method of cooking macaroni in milk. Google couldn't help, so we're counting on you!

dbmamaz
03-08-2011, 11:10 PM
btw, i recently saw a mac and cheese recipe like that - you cook the noodles in milk, letting the starch from the noodles thicken the milk (and adding water if the noodles dont cook enough) and then just stir in grated cheese. I tried it for the boys all gfcf and they seemed happy with it. i cant stand too much of the gf cheese, tho.

BrendaE
03-08-2011, 11:17 PM
haha Yea people do that.. It makes a kind of bechamel. You just cant cook it on a boil or the milk burns to the bottom. Swedish food can get rather weird.... for instance, its perfectly normal to have horse meat mixed into ground meat of any kind in the grocery store. I didnt find this out until I was reading ingredients on a package of frozen meatballs... then I started reading mroe and more meat packages... yep... häst kött (horse meat).... I totally freaked out... haha

Kylie
03-09-2011, 02:27 AM
for instance, its perfectly normal to have horse meat mixed into ground meat of any kind in the grocery store. I didnt find this out until I was reading ingredients on a package of frozen meatballs... then I started reading mroe and more meat packages... yep... häst kött (horse meat).... I totally freaked out... haha

aarrhhh remind to check what I am eating when next in Sweden :-)

Pefa
03-09-2011, 06:19 AM
Many thanks. I don't bother cooking pasta when I'm making mac & cheese or lasagna and it turns out fine. We just couldn't quite wrap our heads around the balance of heat/cook time.

BrendaE
03-09-2011, 06:58 AM
Many thanks. I don't bother cooking pasta when I'm making mac & cheese or lasagna and it turns out fine. We just couldn't quite wrap our heads around the balance of heat/cook time.

ok 2 dl milk to 1 dl pasta...its better with short cuts of pasta. bring milk to a simmer, add pasta and any spices you like, ..12-15 minutes on simmer. add any cheese to melt in at the end.

ETA: a decilitre is about 1 cup..roughly for cooking purposes

AddlepatedMonkeyMama
03-09-2011, 09:03 AM
I have a recipe for mac & cheese on the stove that cooks the pasta in 3.5 cups water and 1 cup evaporated milk. After the pasta is done, you add more milk, cornstarch, and spices then simmer to thicken into a sauce. Last, add shredded cheese. Goopy but tasty, and faster than baked mac & cheese.

farrarwilliams
03-09-2011, 09:14 AM
I know people who do noodles in broth to make them more flavorful. But milk... huh. I do my grits in milk and water though.

hockeymom
03-09-2011, 09:27 AM
Mmmmm...grits. Can't get those up here, nor hominy. Both DH and I have parents from the south (both of his, my dad) and we grew up on southern food. There will always be a place in our palates for certain foods from our childhoods, if just for the memories.

dbmamaz
03-09-2011, 10:15 AM
I had never even heard of grits til i left home, but I like them now. I'm sure you can get other hot cereals tho, right? And in a pinch I made grits using corn meal - it was smoother, because the grind is finer, but the flavor was ok

farrarwilliams
03-09-2011, 12:18 PM
You can't get grits in Canada! How deeply wrong. I felt like they had finally gone national when I had no problem getting them the summer I lived in Seattle - though that was many years ago. The best grits are the ones I get at the old mill (yes, it's literally an old mill with a big water wheel) on the Eno River in NC near my mother's house. Stone ground and lots of extra flavor. Yum.

I almost made shrimp and grits yesterday for Mardi Gras, but then I decided it was too Carolina and made jambalaya and corn fritters instead.

hockeymom
03-09-2011, 01:30 PM
Oh man, we really need to start up that food exchange. Ketchup chips for milled grits? mmmmmm....

hockeymom
03-09-2011, 01:33 PM
I had never even heard of grits til i left home, but I like them now. I'm sure you can get other hot cereals tho, right? And in a pinch I made grits using corn meal - it was smoother, because the grind is finer, but the flavor was ok

Oh yeah, like polenta? I used to make a lot of polenta but we can't get stoneground cornmeal here either. Polenta is always a summer food for me for some reason, served warm with grilled sweet peppers and onions, and a plate of sliced garden tomatoes and fresh cheese on the side. Mmmm...I am so hungry now!

Pefa
03-09-2011, 02:18 PM
Guess I've gotta send B1 to the barn for milk, if only for curiosity's sake.

Years when the jays don't get all the shelling corn we have fabulous grits and polenta, unbelievable the difference grinding it yourself makes. Right now I'm making do w/stoneground cornmeal for polenta (cook it in the crock pot - no stirring required).

Unfortunately the foods I associate w/my childhood are ones I didn't like, such as Maypo - a cracked wheat hot cereal that was nastily gritty maybe it was supposed to be maple flavored (at least the air around the plant smelled like maple). I think my mother must have felt some loyalty because the plant was at the end of our road.

dbmamaz
03-09-2011, 03:23 PM
I still remember eating cocowheat? a chocolate hot cereal!

hockeymom
03-09-2011, 03:35 PM
Growing up, we were allowed one box of "junk cereal" once a year. I always chose Cocoa Puffs, my brother always chose Lucky Charms. I don't think we ever bugged my mom to let us have more because we knew the rule. DS doesn't even know what sugary cereals are, or has never expressed any interest in them anyway.

Jealous, Pefa--grinding your own corn! Good tip on the crock pot (is that the same as a slow cooker?).

farrarwilliams
03-09-2011, 04:10 PM
"Crockpot" is the "Kleenex" to "slow cooker's" "tissue."

I've heard it's really good that way, but every time I use my slow cooker, I end up disappointed. I think I may just need a better Crock Pot, honestly.

dbmamaz
03-09-2011, 08:42 PM
Farrar, the things that I've been happiest with in my slow cooker: Broth - simmer bird carcass for 24 hours - awesome! Chick peas cooked in the slow cooker for 4-6 hours make the CREAMIEST hummus. I also like making baked beans in the slow cooker instead of the oven - you can check on it and adjust as needed. I have one chicken recipe my husband really likes, but i think its just ok. I used to cook a whole chicken in the slow cooker, but it came out dry and overcooked too often. I do want to try a slowcooker "fried" chicken recipe I found recently.

farrarwilliams
03-09-2011, 09:03 PM
My slow cooker overdoes everything. All the meat always ends up really chewy and tough. That's why I sort of think it's the fault of the slow cooker. Maybe for next fall, I'll get myself a better one. An America's Test Kitchen approved one instead of the cheap one I have... which I think I probably got at the thrift store.

mommykicksbutt
03-11-2011, 08:29 AM
Corn meal mush one morning followed by fried (leftover) corn meal mush with maple syrup the next. Anyone else enjoy these? I grew up eating this. Dirt cheap too.

BrendaE
03-11-2011, 08:39 AM
one word. MAYPO!

alexdk
03-13-2011, 04:01 PM
My slow cooker overdoes everything. All the meat always ends up really chewy and tough. That's why I sort of think it's the fault of the slow cooker. Maybe for next fall, I'll get myself a better one. An America's Test Kitchen approved one instead of the cheap one I have... which I think I probably got at the thrift store.

I have the same problem. I think I overused it! I am saving for a new one too, next fall would be good!

dbmamaz
03-13-2011, 04:20 PM
Oh, i'm actually trying to make gfcf mac-n-cheese in the slowcooker without pre-cooking the noodles. Wish me luck!