PDA

View Full Version : Straight to College: Homeschoolers Skipping High School



mommykicksbutt
02-24-2011, 11:37 AM
http://www.squidoo.com/homeschool-to-college

Interesting but... our plan is an occasional CLEP and DSST during high school as well as dual enrollment at college. Then sonny can transfer up to 60 credit hours to university and only spend about 2+ years to get his degree. I know my child and he is not ready for college now so we will continue doing high school.

dbmamaz
02-24-2011, 12:20 PM
The article (if you can call it that) says starting between 14 and 16. I did spend a year driving a kid to and from community college and i wont do it again - 16 minimum! My 14 yo, tho, is not emotionally or academically ready.

Pefa
02-24-2011, 01:11 PM
depends on the kid. There's some financial/academic advantage to getting whatever intro classes done early but what's the rush?

dbmamaz
02-24-2011, 01:46 PM
For me, part of it, esp for my 14 yo, would be that, with his disabilities, I think a 2 year degree will help him get a job, and he'll need some time to get there, so we might as well start early. Honestly, he's not THAT far away, academically. My daughter, towards the end of 10th grade, passed all their entry tests with no problem and was much happier there than in public school.

OTOH, i agree that I have to fight to avoid my mom's 'race to the top' attitude - smarter, faster, thinner, richer . . .

Miguels mommy
02-24-2011, 02:43 PM
We are going to do this with our son. I really don't see the point of retaking classes that he's taking in high school. So he's clepping, DSST, or AP testing for end of the year course starting possibly as early as next year. That will be getting credit through straiter-line, or ALEKS until he reaches 14. So he wont actually go to college campus until around 16. He'll get as many AA, AAS, AS as he wants in high school along with the APID. We feel that campus living, and the job connections you make at college are far more important then the first 1/2- 3/4ths of a BA, or BS. We are hoping after high school he'll take some time off and continue with americorps. I want to make sure he has a college degree before he graduates in case he doesn't want to go to college.

jess
02-24-2011, 06:33 PM
I'm not going the CC route unless I feel they're truly academically and emotionally ready for it. CC is your "permanent record", and your performance has the potential to impact your opportunities even decades later - something I didn't learn until I'd already screwed around in college for several years.

I'm not providing financial support for college at the normal age if they're not taking it seriously, either.

I'll probably encourage them to do at least a few AP tests before jumping into college. You can cut time off of college that way, too.

Teri
02-24-2011, 07:26 PM
AP wasn't terribly helpful to my son. The high school that he went to encouraged the AP classes and taking the test, but the universities are spotty about accepting them. University of Texas would only take a 5 on some of the scores (like biology). If it was a course that was in your major, they wouldn't count it toward the major. So, he ended up with enough credits to be a sophomore because of AP, but not ANY closer to a degree. It was very frustrating. And not cheap either!

sallymae
02-24-2011, 07:35 PM
I wish we could do the college courses before college. How ever, here we get no financial aid for college until after high school. My daughter takes the SAT's every year and has tested out of having to take college entrance locally. But not eligible for any financial aid plus she wants to go to school outside of SC and a lot of the courses credits would not transfer to out of state colleges. Our plan was to have her finish first two years of college in Sparanburg at USC the last two years of high school. But the money put a crimp in that plan. I think if you can get into a college at any age there should be financial aid and scholarship opportunities. To duel enroll it is about 1500 a semester per class.

dbmamaz
02-24-2011, 08:22 PM
No, I dont think there is scholarship money for dual enrolled anywhere. We paid cash for my daughter's classes, but it was probably slightly less than that including books. However, you also have the option of declaring your child 'graduated' and having them matriculate as a regular student, if the college has no age limit. I dont THINK the financial aid has an age limit (tho it does generally have a limit on number of years covered)

The high school actually had a specailty program which allowed high school students to take college classes as part of high school with no tuition, but only if you got in to that specailty program - i think it was only the engineering or robotics program or something like that. But my daughter wanted to study graphic design

jess
02-24-2011, 08:33 PM
AP wasn't terribly helpful to my son. The high school that he went to encouraged the AP classes and taking the test, but the universities are spotty about accepting them. University of Texas would only take a 5 on some of the scores (like biology).
I had similar experiences with AP credits transferring. I'd still prefer they do AP classes until it was clear that they were ready for real college, as that's somewhere where I've seen people have REAL problems - such as not being able to enter a program at all because they took College Algebra too many times 15 years previous during a totally different stage of their life.

lynne
02-24-2011, 10:51 PM
Great article! I like that the option is there if it makes sense for the kid.

QueenBee
02-25-2011, 12:34 AM
This is really interesting - I hadn't thought of it as something to give much thought to, to be honest. I've always planned on having my kids take classes at the local CC when they are around high school age - especially in math and science. Not so much for the purpose to earning college credit (though that is a nice bonus) but b/c we don't have many (actually, ANY) options as homeschoolers in terms of co-ops, etc., so I figured classes at the CC made sense - you can do labs, take higher math, etc. I never thought about the 'permanent record' aspect. Maybe b/c I assumed my kids would do well (typical parent), I don't know. Probably more so because when I was in high school I took classes at the local CC. I didn't start out to, but I ended up being able to graduate from University early b/c of my previously earned college credit - some from the CC and some from AP tests (ironically, no AP classes were offered at my high school - it was a college prep school, but didn't believe in teaching to a test so didn't offer any AP classes). I had no idea that AP scores aren't readily accepted everywhere - my oldest is just hitting middle school age and we are just starting to look at college requirements in detail. I don't think graduating early was a good thing, however!! I still remain envious of the kids that took an extra year to go through. ;)

Thanks for passing along this article! Great food for thought!!

jess
02-25-2011, 03:49 PM
This is really interesting - I hadn't thought of it as something to give much thought to, to be honest. I've always planned on having my kids take classes at the local CC when they are around high school age - especially in math and science. Not so much for the purpose to earning college credit (though that is a nice bonus) but b/c we don't have many (actually, ANY) options as homeschoolers in terms of co-ops, etc., so I figured classes at the CC made sense - you can do labs, take higher math, etc. I never thought about the 'permanent record' aspect.
I think most people don't really think about this until they're hit by it themselves.

I'm actually in it again right now - I'm applying for government jobs, and they want to know all the details about ALL my colleges. It's quite likely that a few bad semesters a decade ago are going to get my ranking knocked down by some automated system that doesn't care about personal circumstances.

And this is obviously not just a community college as a high schooler problem - people who go to college straight out of high school, go crazy with the partying and either flunk out or barely scrape by are in the same boat. And conversely, succeeding as a high schooler in a college setting is going to look very good when applying for universities, jobs, and so forth. I'll certainly let my kids go to CC as high schoolers if I think they're ready to handle it and they keep up their grades.

It just makes me cringe a little when people seem to consider it a no-consequence action because it's "just" community college.

dbmamaz
02-25-2011, 04:08 PM
I'm not clear on your college grades being public record? I mean, my husband has 5 degrees, but only lists 3 on his resume. I've attended tons of colleges here and there, but just dont mention it. My husband has worked for the gov't, but didnt have a security clearance, as he's not a citizen. But I'm pretty sure you need to sign a release for anyone to see your grades, no?

Mommamayi
02-25-2011, 05:27 PM
We've always homeschooled our three kids in a largely unschooling manner.

My 18 year old started taking college classes from our local public university at age 16. He now has junior status towards a computer science degree. We started out by having him take a couple of core classes (Speech and English 111) that were offered through the community college campus and taught at our local highschool in the evenings. The next semester he took a couple more classes, (Modern History and Sociology) this time at the community college itself. After that he took classes directly at the university campus.

We decided to start younger with the next one. We let her take a ballroom dance class on the university campus at age 14. The next semester she wanted to take the next level of it and add a baking class at night. Now this semester, at 15, she's taking yet another dance class (Middle Eastern) as well as her first core class (Psychology) -- a huge class at the university.

In Alaska there are several homeschool programs that you can voluntarily register with and receive an allotment to use for classes/curriculum. Your kids then have to meet state requirements to receive a diploma, which is a bit of a challenge for us as unschoolers, but we've been able to make it work. I have been able to use their annual allotment to help with the cost of the college classes and they receive dual credit. The tuition at our public university is really quite reasonable anyway.

We highly recommend doing this.

jess
02-25-2011, 05:51 PM
I'm not clear on your college grades being public record? I mean, my husband has 5 degrees, but only lists 3 on his resume. I've attended tons of colleges here and there, but just dont mention it. My husband has worked for the gov't, but didnt have a security clearance, as he's not a citizen. But I'm pretty sure you need to sign a release for anyone to see your grades, no?
Yeah, I'm not talking about normal, everyday circumstances. In general, you can be selective about what you list, and there's no problem with that.

When applying to nursing school, at least one of my applications required official transcripts from ALL schools attended, and at least one application stated that it would result in expulsion and possible loss of license to omit any. They want to be sure applicants are actually qualified, and not taking prerequisites 30 times at 20 different colleges in order to get acceptable grades or something like that. So, it's self-disclosure, but one with potentially serious consequences if it it somehow came to light.

I'd imagine similar would be true of other competitive academic programs.

And yes, the government job I was applying for was one requiring a background check.

I'm not trying to say that doing badly in college is going to screw up your whole life from thereon out. I mean, I screwed up, and still got into the most competitive nursing program in my region on the basis of current performance. But I'm not making up the example about the person who couldn't get into a program because she exceeded the maximum number of retakes of some math class at some time in the distant past. I'm sure she could get in somewhere... but it limited her options, and that's the potential I'm trying to make sure people are aware of.

jeliau
03-19-2011, 06:49 AM
And yes, the government job I was applying for was one requiring a background check.

Usually a "background check" doesn't include college. It covers National Agency checks which include driving records, credit, criminal offenses, etc. When you get into security clearances, you do have to list all previous schools but only for a specified period of time. (7 years for Secret, 10 years for Top Secret) You also have to list ALL degrees regardless of when received. The concern is more with your debts and/or "improper" socialization when attending. Now, if the job application itself asks for these, then it might be more subjective. Background checks are only completed on people that are contingent on jobs. They won't waste the money on applicants they aren't already interested in hiring.

Martha
03-19-2011, 11:13 AM
Background checks can include as far back as high school transcript.

My dh has had to sign releases for transcripts and he doesn't even work in govt.

Just this week, I have to send an official and current spring transcript for my 15 year old to apply for the NASA online learning community. I would suppose if it had CC or other classes, those would go as well.

CLEP, AP, even community college classes - all of these might or might NOT be accepted at any other college. It depends on the course, the score, the major, and other factors.

That's why we have narrowed our college options to two things:
Within a 12 hour drive
Accepting of CLEP, AP, and CC credits.

Those who have more money might be able to afford the luxury of letting their student pick any school they want. We simply do not have that luxury.

The good news is there are some GREAT college options available to my kids even with this restrictions.

We haven't closed the door on any opportunities. If something outside our scope comes up as a viable non debt from hell laden option, we will look at it.

But as far as my high school plans go, keeping our scope in mind as been very helpful. I don't look at state graduation requirements, I look at where my child is and what those colleges in our scope are looking for. Then we slowly but surely work towards meeting that goal. I would love for my kids to have at least an associates or very close to it by high school graduation.

Wish us luck! We plan to take our first CLEP within the next few weeks! Western civilization 1 for 6 college credits!

jeliau
03-19-2011, 11:21 PM
Background checks can include as far back as high school transcript.

I referred to *official* background checks for jobs requiring access to nationally sensitive material, or jobs involving childcare, etc. Each business will do what they want and it is the potential employees choice to provide the information or not and/or take the job or not. However, some jobs require a background check and the level checked depends on the type of job. For example, access to children requires NACAC with fingerprinting. If every college is checked it's because the employer asked for it, not because it's required. Sensitive jobs require more indepth checks where the "7/10 year with degrees" rule comes into play. Official background checks like PSI (Personnel Security Investigation) cover character, loyalty, trustworthiness and reliability. NACAC includes criminal national agency and local agency checks.

Jeliau

Mom to dd (24), dd (21), homeschooled ds (9), and gd (1)

Outofrange
03-20-2011, 10:27 PM
There is a charter high school here in our town that offers duel enrollment (at no charge to the student) at the local Community College. At the end of high school the child earns both their high school diploma and their Associates degree. It seems like a great program to me but I am not sure of the specifics. Does anyone else have programs like that offered in their area?

dbmamaz
03-20-2011, 10:33 PM
I thought the programs here didnt offer quite that many credits to actually get a 2 year degree, but I think there is at least one specailty (engineering) center here where you take classes AT the specailty center taught by proffessors and the credits are guarenteed accepted by one of the local engineering programs. I didnt look in to it much as my daughter wasnt interested - but there was an annual open house where all the specailty centers had representatives in one location and you could go to the various presentations. The engineering center had their robot out, too.

Martha
03-21-2011, 10:09 AM
I'm not sure why you put official in astriks, bc I was referring to official as well as unofficial ways the grades in college can follow a student. Which was all the pp was saying. That grades can follow you, so she wants to be sure her dc is ready when he starts that official documentation.:)

We have dual enrollment here, but the number of credits permitted under the program is limited. (to I think 12, but I could be wrong) However, combined with CLEP or AP scores of 5, the total accumulation could possibly garner an AA or very close to it by high school graduation.

CLEP and APs are available everywhere, so are distance learning classes that give credit. If you are willing to think outside the box of a brick and mortar college experience for at least some of the credits, if not most of them, you could gain considerable distance towards a degree by high school graduation.

Topsy
03-21-2011, 11:18 AM
There is a charter high school here in our town that offers duel enrollment (at no charge to the student) at the local Community College. At the end of high school the child earns both their high school diploma and their Associates degree. It seems like a great program to me but I am not sure of the specifics. Does anyone else have programs like that offered in their area?

We have something called "Early College (http://www.earlycolleges.org/)" here in NC that is very much like what you mention. However, we opted not to try to get into it because it is VERY rigorous, and they tend to choose kids whose parents have not attended college as first choices for the program.