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GothicGyrl
02-17-2011, 12:15 PM
If there's one thing I cannot stand about homeschooling issues, it's that some homeschoolers turn their latest doomsday beliefs into a homeschooling one. :)

Basically, on another board, a certain homeschooler is absolutely convinced we are in the end times economically and wants to go "off the grid" so badly, she's willing to compromise everything she has and go broke by spending all of her money on cows, chickens, books, and a place to live so far up in the mountains, only "god" can find her. And she posted this on a homeschooling board, where other homeschoolers are agreeing with her.

This peeves me because it defeats the purpose of having a homeschooling board and makes me feel unwelcome because I don't share their doomsday belief. I just don't get this line of thinking. And what's worse is that so much of our homeschooling curricula today is so religiously centered, that they are teaching this belief to their kids via the curriculum they just spent a mortgage payment on to use.

I guess I just don't get the fear mongering. Is my family hurting right now? Yes, but not because of the economy (directly), but because our "lovely" Governor thinks teachers suck and need to be paid based on merit (which is a whole nother rant). As the wife of a teacher (and many homeschoolers are former or current ones), this is about the only thing that worries me.

But it would be wrong of me to turn it into a homeschooling issue. So why does everything certain people say have to become the same?

dbmamaz
02-17-2011, 12:19 PM
Just because something is discussed on a homeschooling board doesnt make it a homeschooling issue. these people have just found some like-minded ppl on that forum, and are happily discussing a subject you dislike. Dont read the posts that arent of interest to you. Or stay here and wonder wtf our random posts have to do w homeschooling . . .

GothicGyrl
02-17-2011, 12:24 PM
Actually, I have figured out that our random posts have much more to do with homeschooling than anything they've posted in a long while. Topsy sees to that by way of board design. Everything is controlled in such a way that we don't really have the opportunity to go off topic that much. AND, we are all a group of women that see how nonsensical some things really are and are able to reach conclusions and ends-to-means within our discussions.

I've yet to see that on any other board. :)

Really, the issue for me isn't so much that I could stop reading it (which I can, but then I wouldn't get my "funny" fix :) ), but that I feel we homeschoolers are hurting ourselves by allowing this kind of thinking to prevail. It has a lot to do with why there are more Christian curricula than Secular out there. Supply and demand. But then, why aren't we secular homeschoolers standing up and demanding the secular stuff?

See what I mean? :)

And mainly, I wanted to vent. LOL. Now if only I could find the time to actually write that secular curricula I have outlined........................

bcnlvr
02-17-2011, 12:24 PM
What dbmamaz said. I lurk on another board...and post JUST enough to have the required number to sell my used curricula when I'm done with it. I ONLY read threads regarding what *I* need info about and that's it. They are fruitcakes over there and I like my fruitcakes over here much better! :)

GothicGyrl
02-17-2011, 12:29 PM
I think you and I lurk on the same board, bcnlvr (btw, love the name). :) Yes, they are fruitcakes and thus, my daily dose of "the funnies". I can't help but read some of the things they post and wonder just how they got this far if everything is so doomsday with them.

But yes, I do like my fruitcakes here better. I don't even sell my stuff over there because most of it is the dread PS texts and we just cannot have those things influencing their minds! :)

dbmamaz
02-17-2011, 01:09 PM
but that I feel we homeschoolers are hurting ourselves by allowing this kind of thinking to prevail. It has a lot to do with why there are more Christian curricula than Secular out there. Supply and demand. But then, why aren't we secular homeschoolers standing up and demanding the secular stuff?
Maybe its because I refuse to hang out on boards which i find offensive instead of helpful - since i believe they detract from the energy I have available to live my life the way I want to. BUt I dont see this at all. "hurting ourself by allowing this kind of thinking to prevail" implies that 1. you are part of a group of ppl who believe the end of the world is coming - i refuse to count myself as a member of any such group. and 2. that you can change the way other people think. Folly.

Furthermore, secular homeschoolers ARE buying secular curriculum and passing the word around about them. I guess thats the one good thing about hanging out in those big crazy boards - maybe you can occasionally help other lost secular homeschoolers to find there way somewhere better.

It does sound like really you just want to vent. That would make this at least the third post started on this board simply for the purpose of expressing how annoyed someone is at 'that other board'.

which means, I suppose, that I should learn to ignore THESE posts . . . sigh

GothicGyrl
02-17-2011, 01:21 PM
Well, this is the 1st thread *I* have started venting about that. Unless you are counting the HSLDA one and I only posted that in response to a post *here* regarding them. :)

Second, it IS a homeschooling issue, therefore, I can post it here, no matter who I am venting about. Yes, do hang out on other boards, this isn't the only one, and yes, there are some ingrates over on those boards that nerve me. However, that doesn't mean I can't find a common place to vent or even discuss something that I see there happening that could affect other homeschoolers. YOU may not see yourself worrying over certain things, and I do not see myself doing so either.

However, this thread wasn't just started as a vent, but more so as a way to vent OUT what we think might be causing otherwise intelligent homeschoolers to feel this way, causing new homeschoolers to join in. Maybe instead of making US exclusive, we could see ourselves as a way to seek out those on other places that are just like us and help them over to the darkside? :)

Of course, you are just as free to ignore mine and other posts similar. But then, if we all did that, we'd have nothing to talk about. :)

laundrycrisis
02-17-2011, 01:28 PM
Really, the issue for me isn't so much that I could stop reading it (which I can, but then I wouldn't get my "funny" fix :) ), but that I feel we homeschoolers are hurting ourselves by allowing this kind of thinking to prevail. It has a lot to do with why there are more Christian curricula than Secular out there. Supply and demand. But then, why aren't we secular homeschoolers standing up and demanding the secular stuff?



I can't control what other people think....wait....nope, can't do it. :cool:

I can't demand secular materials, but they are available, and I can support that by purchasing them. This, for me, is a big reason why I avoid buying materials that have a religious orientation and "secularizing" them. When there is an alternative that is 100% secular, I will support that one instead. Also, when I use a great secular curriculum product, I publish a great review for it, in order to help promote it. I especially want to support those who bring us great products that venture into the area of evolution from a purely scientific pov. That must be a tough market....will parents with kids in public school buy it ? Probably not many of them. Homeschoolers are still a pretty small group, and when you narrow it down further, to those of us who are comfortable with studying that in-depth, in that way, I imagine that is a pretty small market. We can support those publishers..and we can support the vendors who carry those products without "screening" them through a religious filter. We can help grow and support the market for secular homeschooling materials.

GothicGyrl
02-17-2011, 01:35 PM
Wait, I can't control others? Damn it, there goes that plan...:)

I had a nice post all ready to go and poof, the board ate it. Suffice it to say, laundryCrisis, I agree with what you are saying, I just don't see it happening *enough* to get supply/demand to meet properly.

I hate it when the board eats my posts.

BrendaE
02-17-2011, 02:50 PM
Want to really get mad?? Because Hawaii Christian Home Schoolers hahah they have a thing going where they spread around that its AGAINST EVERYTHING to have a curriculum without their god. They lobby everyone they can for NOT buying any non bible based curricula. They call it "The Trojan Horse". They try and blame it on govt funded home school laws. To them its sneaking in science and history without their god and its going to ruin everything in the future.
Here is a lil ol movie or a clip of it anyway... Idiots (http://www.christianhomeschoolersofhawaii.org/Exposing%20a%20Trojan%20Horse.mov)

because to them, home schooling is only for christians.. or something .. and "heaven forbid" anyone who wants to should be able to. I actually DO think its like a trojan horse. The more children have access to science and how to use it, the less likely they will be susceptible to insane religious dogma even if they ARE home schooled in a religious environment. YAY technology!

dbmamaz
02-17-2011, 03:01 PM
Someone said they once had someone ask "why would you homeschool if you arent christain?" it is funny (and sad and scary) how insulated some ppls view of the world is.

Stella M
02-17-2011, 03:07 PM
Just don't go to the other place :) Speaking as someone who has btdt and annoyed myself ( and probably Cara! ) I see your point but it isn't worth the energy. Truly, it isn't worth it. And as an instigator and culprit in the random off-topic-ness that goes on around here, I can't really be calling the kettle black. People like to talk. For me, it's punctuation, for them it's end times. I hear your frustration and of course those women are loopy! but I think they tend to keep their loopiness to the general boards. They probably feel that they have a community there and that's the place they go to share. The academic boards are more focused on homeschooling if you need to be there for classical ed reasons.

GothicGyrl
02-17-2011, 03:10 PM
dude that video made my head go splody! Holy sh&t. No way no how. And here I thought Hawaii was a fairly liberal state.

lynne
02-17-2011, 03:18 PM
Well, I guess I am one of the doomers too, although I don't discuss it here. It has absolutely nothing to do with our homeschooling decisions. I just think that there *are* indications that it is a good idea to "prepare". All fiat currencies eventually collapse and there is strong reason to believe it will happen soon. The FED is admittedly creating inflation now....the IMF/World Bank is beginning to talk about the dollar no longer being the reserve currency and the ultimate goal of central banks is world socialism with one money supply. So, that is probably why people are openly discussing this. It's not crazy talk, imo. Nobody knows for sure when things will happen or exactly how, but there is never harm in being prepared. I think it's smart to have some of your savings in precious metals and at least a year's supply of food is not a bad idea either. Again, just my opinion knowing what I know about the economy. I follow Peter Schiff pretty closely and he predicted the housing bubble in '06 and everyone laughed at him....but he was right. He recommends buying gold, getting out of the dollar and investing overseas. I think he is right. But, I am here on this forum for the homeschool support only.:)

BrendaE
02-17-2011, 03:22 PM
dude that video made my head go splody! Holy sh&t. No way no how. And here I thought Hawaii was a fairly liberal state.

I am the only secular home school mom that I know of, and it is not for lack of looking/seeking... *sighs*

We have just gained rights for gay people to enter into civil union, but even our elections for governor a few months ago.. it was played out by the candidates getting churches to move the vote etc.

Its a very religious island. Largely due to ignorance. The cultural aspect of this is because the polynesian islands were so inundated with missionaries oh so long ago and there was a change from polytheism to christianity. Funny enough they still keep to their "magic" ways .. they just changed the names of their gods to the god of christianity... Its.. so.. hmm If you ever get a chance to read a book called The Shark God... it will make clear how this twisted convolution has happened.

Still, for all the military families here, I would think I would find at least SOME secular home schoolers... alas.. I think they are in hiding like us after a few "outings" to meet and greet etc.

Topsy
02-17-2011, 03:30 PM
Well, I guess I am one of the doomers too,

I love that name, actually. The "doomers". I swear that if the creator of the "Simpsons" had thought of that one first he would have had a hit on his hands!! ;)

I'm definitely not a doomer (I was cursed with positive thinking genes), but I do understand the desire to be prepared. I've recently become involved with the Transition Movement (http://www.transitionus.org/), which has become active in our town, and it makes a lot of sense to me. The simple fact that we are at the moment of "peak oil" and that it's downhill from here as far as supply is concerned seems to be reason enough to at least try to live more sustainably. Whether or not we think the world economy is going to collapse (and like I said, my brain doesn't work that way), I think we still need to figure out how to survive with less, on less money, and with more concern for the future.

So although I doubt I'll ever be "off the grid", I do love the idea behind the Transition movement which is to join together as communities to create plans for resiliency in a changing world.

LOL - GothicGyrl - I just realized I hijacked your rant thread to talk more about the thing you were ranting about people talking about on other forums. APOLOGIES!!

Stella M
02-17-2011, 03:35 PM
OK, all you 'transitioners' here - I was calling the ladies on the other board loopy! No offence to anyone here!

I see the world changing dramatically in my children's lifetime but instead of doing anything practical about it, I just think it's an interesting idea for a poem or two. so maybe my chickens will come home to roost and the doomer/transitioner's kids will be doing fine and mine will be left clutching a few pages of manuscript as the floods keep rising.

GothicGyrl
02-17-2011, 03:44 PM
Thing is, I'm not saying that America isn't hurting--we are. We've remained a super power for far too long and our egos killed us. But what I was more trying to get at was the dooming going on--I like to think of the movie with Brendan Fraiser--the one where his father builds the nuclear bomb shelter and he lives in it until he turns 30 or something? yeah, that to me, is too much. And that's what I'm hearing going on right now.

**Those** are the people I was talking about. I WISH I could garden-but to garden, you first need a fence, which takes money I don't have. I already live well below my means for the most part and I can't get any lower. Sure, I've got things we could cut out, but just how low do I have to go before it affects my quality of life? That's what I refuse to give up. I can probably do without phone and cable, because I have internet. But I'm not giving up phone, cable, AND internet. I can probably do without a car, since I don't work, but what happens when I do get a job and since I live in a no public transport area, I'd have to get another. But then again, if I had no car, my kid would truly be "home" schooling because we'd go NOwhere :)

See what I mean now? :)

Stella M
02-17-2011, 03:49 PM
I see what you mean. I do. But really, from bitter experience, just don't go there. Or don't open those threads. Come here if you want to have a robust but sane conversation about anything homeschool-related or not.

Miguels mommy
02-17-2011, 03:51 PM
I've bought some complete out right religious stuff. I mean "Gg, God is good." type stuff but that's the only thing that got Miguel writing. Why'd I buy it because it was $4.50, I tried the cheap secular stuff, I tried expensive stuff , I change curriculum to much to buy expensive stuff more than once. The religious curriculum gives us a chance to talk about good intentions, flawed thinking, taking responsibility for actions and respecting others. Now there were some curriculum that are religious that say they can be secularized and I just can't see it. Yes I hate having to pay 2x-3x as much for secular stuff. I'm sorry but what I'm looking for is a middle ground for around $200, that fit's our style. If I can get close enough with religious curriculum than I will. I do feel both religious and secular families are doing there best. There are all types of fanatics and yes I'm against fanatical thinking no matter what it's about but there's enough of the population to think this way that there's a curriculum for it then it's there to make money. I also do not feel most home-schoolers start out fanatical but the curriculum and community turn them that way.

dbmamaz
02-17-2011, 04:26 PM
I also do not feel most home-schoolers start out fanatical but the curriculum and community turn them that way.
Obviously i have no statistics, but there are large conservative churches which encourage families to homeschool in order to make religion the center of the kids world. I would be really suprised if moderate xtians became fanatical because of homeschool curriculum.

GothicGyrl
02-17-2011, 04:46 PM
I wouldn't. Face it, nearly most new homeschoolers start out with what's out there--abeka, bju, etc... because they were not told any differently. Even *I* started out that way. A lot have the benefit of being able to research beforehand, but many do not and just go with what they are told. If they were already moderately believing, I can definitely see them swinging one way or another as their homeschooling years go by, just because of the community they hang out with and the curricula they use.

dbmamaz
02-17-2011, 05:33 PM
i guess i'm just weird. didnt do any of those.

laundrycrisis
02-17-2011, 05:47 PM
I didn't either.

GothicGyrl
02-17-2011, 05:57 PM
Take this as a compliment---your picture makes you look younger than I am (38) and because of that, I would (rightly or wrongly) assume that you maybe had a better head start at this homeschooling game than most did--which is my point. I did not come into homeschooling **prepared** to do it. I did it out of necessity. I did it because there was no other choice for my kids. Therefore, I had no time to prepare for anything, let alone a K and 4th grader to school at home.

And I would gather that many, many homeschoolers are or were in that position moreso than the two of you who may or may not have had time to prepare for this. :)

(like all my qualifiers? I don't think I put enough smilie faces, so here's one more :) )

Kylie
02-17-2011, 06:24 PM
I simply just stay away. If I was there I would have to read ( I can't help myself) and then I would just be off complaining and whining about those fruitloops that frequent other boards LOL!!! I've realised that crap sucks the life out of me and I don't need it, not even enough to get the small amount of 'good stuff' that might happen on those boards.

I do try to be buy secular when I can also. It is happening and the secular curricular market will grow with time (I know that doesn't help us now) but as more secular folk either come out of the closet or simply begin to homeschool then obviously the demand will grow.

Ana
02-17-2011, 07:26 PM
I have a Frugal Living forum, but it is secular. I started it out of necessity and because I am close enough to retirement that we had to start cutting back drastically. Then we had to come back to Mexico to live until my husbands paperwork is finished, I am glad I went "frugal" in 2006, the money we set aside all those years of living that way has allowed us to stay in a very nice town here, out of harms way. It has also allowed us to visit many countries! I am also all about solar power, because it is cheaper and earth friendly. We do grow our own veggies and can them because using a freezer in Mexico cost a lot of money! Our electricity is set up to where if we need to run the air, we can't use the washer or dryer. If the dryer is going, we can't use the microwave...etc..you get the picture, I am sure.

It is also a game with me. let's see how little I can spend and get the best bargain..etc..

All of that being said, doomsday people frighten me. Desperate people do desperate things. when someone speaks of going off the grid, I think of the The Branch Davidians, The Family, House of Yahweh, The People's Temple, Jeffrey Lundgren...etc..and wackos like Ted Kaczynski. I am invested in the Chinese market as well as metals more so than American dollar markets, because that scares me right now as well. I remember losing approx 12,000 within 3 months in 2008 when the bear market hit a low.

As far as secular curriculum, you can buy some great secular textbooks through the same companies who supply the public schools if nothing else. I LOVE textbook.com too.

Wild~Iris
02-17-2011, 11:31 PM
"Off the grid" living is not what most people think. It is a lot of doing without, and mountains of work.
As for the religious content of most home school curricula- I do use some obviously religious material. My daughters laugh at the references to God or the Bible because the references seem so silly, so indoctrinating, that the girls cannot take it seriously. Unfortunately some of the best curriculum is produced by religious vendors. Why haven't more secular publishers filled the gap?

The sky is always falling. I personally think the whole planet is in turmoil. Unemployment among the young is a global problem and not just here in America. Natural resources are being depleted at such a rapid rate that one has to wonder if our children will have petrol in the future or potable water. We have no Pax Romana here.

The key to other board is if you want to fight, say what you think. Otherwise ignore the voices of Doom & Gloom that seek to distract you from homeschooling. You can choose to open that thread or not. Being left of the left, know that if you express your true views you may very well be quashed, but be careful of becoming as close minded as they.

Ana
02-17-2011, 11:44 PM
"Off the grid" living is not what most people think. It is a lot of doing without, and mountains of work.
As for the religious content of most home school curricula- I do use some obviously religious material. My daughters laugh at the references to God or the Bible because the references seem so silly, so indoctrinating, that the girls cannot take it seriously. Unfortunately some of the best curriculum is produced by religious vendors. Why haven't more secular publishers filled the gap?

The sky is always falling. I personally think the whole planet is in turmoil. Unemployment among the young is a global problem and not just here in America. Natural resources are being depleted at such a rapid rate that one has to wonder if our children will have petrol in the future or potable water. We have no Pax Romana here.

The key to other board is if you want to fight, say what you think. Otherwise ignore the voices of Doom & Gloom that seek to distract you from homeschooling. You can choose to open that thread or not. Being left of the left, know that if you express your true views you may very well be quashed, but be careful of becoming as close minded as they.

If I could 'Like' this post, I would.

Jennifer R. James
02-17-2011, 11:53 PM
This post epitomizes everything I love about this site and disliked about all of the others I visited before finding this one. As you can imagine, in Mississippi it is extremely difficult to do anything without being surrounded by doomsdayers. I've only been here a short time, but it feels like home. :)

Jennifer R. James
02-18-2011, 12:00 AM
Having said the above, since I know you guys are of the same philosopy, I would be forever indebted if you would point me toward some seriuosly inexpensive 6th and 7th grade History curriculum. 6th requires study of world history, ancients through the exploration of the Americas. 7th requires study of American History, westward expansion through present. I need a simple curriculum, as my son is a slow reader. I am trying to stay in line with public school standards in case my kids decide to reenter ps. Thanks in advance, ladies!

floridamom
02-18-2011, 12:17 PM
Funny enough they still keep to their "magic" ways .. they just changed the names of their gods to the god of christianity... Its.. so.. hmm If you ever get a chance to read a book called The Shark God... it will make clear how this twisted convolution has happened.


Sorry to be one of those who goes off topic, but this sounds a lot like how religion developed in Cuba. They have a strange mix of Catholicism, old African religions, and indigenous beliefs.

floridamom
02-18-2011, 12:30 PM
I'm definitely not a doomer (I was cursed with positive thinking genes),

So was I. Being Pollyanna is not always a good thing is it? Though I think it's why I don't have high blood pressure. :)

floridamom
02-18-2011, 12:39 PM
Having said the above, since I know you guys are of the same philosopy, I would be forever indebted if you would point me toward some seriuosly inexpensive 6th and 7th grade History curriculum. 6th requires study of world history, ancients through the exploration of the Americas. 7th requires study of American History, westward expansion through present. I need a simple curriculum, as my son is a slow reader. I am trying to stay in line with public school standards in case my kids decide to reenter ps. Thanks in advance, ladies!

I've never been able to find a secular history curriculum I like and have always had to pull it together myself. This year (7th grade and we're doing Am. History) I used a religious curriculum that I secularized. I really didn't want to give them my money, but I liked the way it was laid out and couldn't find anything comparable. I don't care for a textbook approach and neither does my son.

Are you familiar with Learning Through History (http://www.learningthroughhistory.com/index.html) magazine? It's not a curriculum, but is secular and and a good add-on to whatever you're using. I just noticed when I went to get the link that they now have much more than just the magazine. I've never bought any of the other products. Look for the link to the magazine issues.

wild_destiny
02-18-2011, 04:00 PM
If I may add my 2 cents worth, while I cannot take any side in the debate about the validity of a doomsday doctrine, I would point out that turmoil is not a new reality. Since the dawn of man, there have always been those unscrupulous people who sought to control or abuse those around them. And if "bad guys", both of years gone by and of current years, were not enough for the average person to worry about, there were/are plenty of bad happenings of the natural sort. Hence, it strikes me as odd that there inevitably end up being groups of people who for whatever reason think that their lifespan is the one when some ultimate disaster will strike. Disasters have been striking and will continue to strike. Nothing new about it. Giving in to some ultimate doomsday scenario and holing up does seem extreme to me. And yet, I do think there is a very valid point about preparedness. Even most government agencies recommend having things on hand (water, first aid supplies, etc.) to last a number of days, because you just never know when or what precisely, but you can know that it is not in left field for bad things to happen. The point of preparedness is just that--to be prepared within reason for what is most likely to befall.
I particularly love the notions that have already been expressed about just trying to live more simply, with an eye to the future, rather than engaging in a lifestyle of wastefulness. Certainly, though, I do not think we need to be moving to mountains in the middle of Tibet. One of the biggest benefits of technology is that if it is handled with care (not that it has been thus far, but I, too, have at least some optimism in me), it has the potential to create many better sustainable comforts than previous centuries have had. There exists the definite potential to create new and better upgrades of things that are used, so that instead of returning to the time of out-houses and wash boards and dirt floors, we can have quality, sanitary, sustainable items that are free of the harmful wastefulness of much of our current technology.

Anyway, if someone wants to go ahead and live on a mountain and find friends on a forum that are like-minded, then power to them. I may not agree, but will be glad to give them the same courtesy and respect that I would really like to have. And also, when the power does go out, I will know where to go to borrow some jam! ;)

lynne
02-18-2011, 04:27 PM
I think the reason people are talking about going off the grid is because if/when the dollar collapses (and there are a lot of indications it is close to happening), people are worried about civil unrest. Imagine if all of a sudden one day the govt can't supply social security checks, welfare and food stamps because they are broke. Imagine how crazy things could get very quickly. That's what worries people and that's why people are going off the grid, learning how to live off the land again. Learning how to grow their own food, hunt, fish, etc. Becoming independent of "the system".

Jennifer R. James
02-18-2011, 06:58 PM
Thanks, Kathy. Do you mind telling me which curriculum you used and secularized? My son, too, does better with workbooks than textbooks. I have some 6th grade social studies workbook curriculum here, and it doesn't qualify as history or social studies at all, in my opinion. It should have been called Bible history, and offered as an aside to another book about the ancients. It is based only in Bible stories, leaving out almost everything I learned about the same cultures in that grade except in how they relate to Bible characters in their "sin." If yours is more fact-based, with a few references to faith, I can deal with that. Even if I were a Christian, I would NOT use the curriculum I currently have. It isn't educating; it's indoctrinating!

jess
02-18-2011, 08:01 PM
I admit - we're preppers. I think that a sane prepping lifestyle contributes to peace of mind rather than detracting from it, especially since society's periodic freak-outs like this and Y2K and so forth have less impact.

We even moved out to semi-the-middle-of-nowhere (but in a sensible way - off the beaten path, but not too far from a town where I should be able to eventually find a job).

At the moment, we aren't as prepared as I'd like, but at the very least, we're on land where we can grow stuff, with water rights and a good well. And we're happy this way - it isn't something we're enduring until Jesus comes or anything like that :)

http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/ has a forum with a homeschooling section, which isn't 100% fundamentalists, though probably similar proportions to that other big homeschooling board none of us admits reading even though we all do.

lynne
02-18-2011, 08:41 PM
Thanks Jess. I listen to survivalpodcast but didn't realize there was a forum. I'm going to go check it out:).

kewb22
02-19-2011, 08:09 AM
I dream of going off the grid. It sounds so lovely. Milking my cow. Feeding my chickens and eating those fresh eggs. Generating my own electricity. Building my home from logs cut from trees around me. Idyllic days churning butter and making candles with the children. But, then I have a reality check. Such as the convenience of take out. Being 20 minutes from the supermarket. Stepping outside and chatting with my neighbors.

I have been on a quest to simplify over the past couple of years. I like not being part of the consumer culture. Should the world as I know it end and I have some skills that will help my family through it, well that will be awesome. Should the world continue on and my skills keep me happy and well fed, well that is awesome, too.

What does all this have to do with homeschooling? If there is one thing I have learned on this journey it is that life is school. My kids are learning what they live. All I can do is take care of my family the way I see fit and that is what the ultra-religious and the doomers are doing. I find that almost everything relates to homeschooling. It may not relate to the formal lessons of the day but it relates to our family culture and homeschooling is part of that.

I will now admit that I find the doomer threads fascinating. I find it difficult to imagine living in such fear. I can't live that way. I would never leave the house. Plus, I sometimes pick up a good tip

Topsy
02-19-2011, 08:24 AM
Having said the above, since I know you guys are of the same philosopy, I would be forever indebted if you would point me toward some seriuosly inexpensive 6th and 7th grade History curriculum. 6th requires study of world history, ancients through the exploration of the Americas. 7th requires study of American History, westward expansion through present. I need a simple curriculum, as my son is a slow reader. I am trying to stay in line with public school standards in case my kids decide to reenter ps. Thanks in advance, ladies!

Jennifer...don't have an answer for 6th grade, but the Time4Learning (http://www.time4learning.com) 7th grade American history course is AWESOME. It is multimedia, simple, and interactive. My son has dyslexia and is a visual learner and this was his favorite history course by far. He couldn't finish it quite in that one year (it's pretty comprehensive!) so it carried over a little into his 8th grade as well. It might seem pricey for just a history course ($20 per month) but you get language arts, math, and science all for that one price.

floridamom
02-19-2011, 08:57 AM
Thanks, Kathy. Do you mind telling me which curriculum you used and secularized? My son, too, does better with workbooks than textbooks.

Mine doesn't do well with textbooks or workbooks. I've been using Winter Promise. There's a middle school Am. History course in two parts called American Crossing and American Culture. It combines a literature approach with some hands on activities, and tries to follow a Charlotte Mason style.

I only bought the instructor's guide. I didn't get any of the books, including the Time Traveler book that is their spine. I follow the guide, and get most of the books from the library. If I can't find the required book, I just look at the subject and substitute. I also use a DK encyclopedia and the Learning through History magazines I mentioned. I also don't use all of the historical fiction because some of it has a religious message.

My method isn't for everyone, but I've done it for years and like it. I used to make my own unit studies. Most people prefer not to have to run around finding materials or substitute materials. I rather enjoy it. Winter Promise is quite Christian and not easy to secularize. From looking at the catalog I think it gets harder as you get to the higher grades, so I'm not sure if I will use it again.

camaro
02-19-2011, 08:59 AM
I've often wondered how the doomsdayers can continue to predict The End when time after time the predicted time of The End passes without The End happening. Do they really accept "Ooops! My bad! This really is The End this time!"?

Anyway, here on our farm we milk a cow, have chickens for eggs, grow a garden and raise our own beef. It gives us a sense of satisfaction eating our own produce. It's also ulcer and grey hair inducing. Our most recent dilemma was a weasel getting into the chicken house a couple of times and killing a bunch of chickens until we caught it and dispatched it. Gotta love country living!

MarkInMD
02-19-2011, 10:50 PM
I'd like to think I have it in me to go off grid if need be, but I don't know that I could. If I did, I'd have to become a vegetarian, because I don't relish the thought of being caretaker of a whole bunch of animals. Dogs are as far as I go.

I'm a dyed-in-the-wool skeptic when it comes to most anything, doomsday theories included. That being said, I would not at all be surprised to see at least some of the stuff that Lynne is talking about happening. I just think odds are they won't, at least not to that degree.

Stella M
02-20-2011, 01:43 AM
I have a recurring dream about how it's all going to end. It involves water, lots of it. Learn to swim ? Build a boat ? Buy a fishing rod ? Life with the ultimate goal of being off the grid is in some ways a denial of life now; privileging the future over the present time.

Jennifer R. James
02-20-2011, 02:19 AM
Thanks Topsy and Kathy. I know it was a little off topic, but I agreed with the general consensus of opinion on this thread, so I thought you guys were the ones to ask. :)

I love the idea of being off the grid in order to enjoy a healthier, happier life, not out of any fear. That said, when detaching becomes a source of anxiety, rather than a relief from it, I draw a line in the sand for my family.

Stella M
02-20-2011, 02:30 AM
Well said Jennifer.

jess
02-20-2011, 03:17 PM
I have a recurring dream about how it's all going to end. It involves water, lots of it. Learn to swim ? Build a boat ? Buy a fishing rod ? Life with the ultimate goal of being off the grid is in some ways a denial of life now; privileging the future over the present time.
Do you live near the ocean (or some other large body of water)? When I did (and for a few years afterwards), I frequently had dreams involving disasters with lots of water.

I don't see how having a goal of living off the grid is any more a denial of life now than any other goal, as long as it's actually something you want. Someone can lose track of the present at least as easily if their goal is owning a bigger house or any other more traditional goal. How many people work long hours while their kids are in daycare so that they can improve their circumstances above what could be a perfectly acceptable baseline?

Now, if living off the grid is a purely fear-based decision and not something they want, it's another story entirely, because achieving the goal is unlikely to contribute to their happiness.

Similar with being a prepper. Having it as a part of your life - buying a bit extra food with each shopping trip until you have a store that you feel adequate and then rotating it appropriately, for example - shouldn't produce stress or (if done appropriately) financial burden, and provides security in the event of pretty much any sort of emergency, personal (how many people are having to choose between feeding their family and keeping their houses already?) or widespread.

On the other hand, being constantly sure the end of the world is at hand must be stressful. Going crazy every few years when some new bogeyman pops up and you realize you would be completely screwed by even a small disruption in the supply chain and running out and buying a month's supply of canned food that you'll never use is stressful, emotionally and financially, too.

Stella M
02-20-2011, 03:36 PM
Yes, I meant the kind of people Jennifer described, for whom 'detaching becomes a source of anxiety'. That would apply to some of the materialists you mention above as well. I think it's possible, if difficult, to balance the now and the future - I was talking about when that becomes extreme, and the future and its anxieties become privileged over the now. The OP was annoyed by people with that mind-set expressing their anxieties on a homeschooling forum.

The water thing ? No, really, that's the way the world ends :)

jess
02-20-2011, 04:55 PM
The water thing ? No, really, that's the way the world ends :)

Maybe you're right. The nuclear war dream I had the other day even turned into a water dream.

(And at risk of discrediting my theory about peace of mind with that - I've had nuclear war and disaster dreams since I was 4ish, and it's the cause of me leaning towards prepper-ness, not the effect :))

Stella M
02-20-2011, 05:20 PM
:) Gotta love a night spent dreaming of the apocalypse!

lynne
02-20-2011, 05:27 PM
I watched a documentary on the Georgia Guidestones recently, I think it was on the History Channel or something. Some of the researchers speculated that that area was chosen because it would NOT be under water. A large part of the US will be according to this theory but I can't remember the specifics of it. Your post made me think of that:).

Here it is, around 7 minutes into it
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uQ18G9Xl2RQ&playnext=1&list=PL84337A1C7A618D82

(not saying I believe it)

Jeni
02-21-2011, 04:40 PM
I watched a documentary on the Georgia Guidestones recently, I think it was on the History Channel or something. Some of the researchers speculated that that area was chosen because it would NOT be under water. A large part of the US will be according to this theory but I can't remember the specifics of it. Your post made me think of that:).

Here it is, around 7 minutes into it
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uQ18G9Xl2RQ&playnext=1&list=PL84337A1C7A618D82

(not saying I believe it)

We saw that same program. Totally interesting.

Batgirl
02-21-2011, 11:54 PM
Yeah, the degree of religious zeal/conservatism was a huge shocker to me when I first started researching hs materials and lurking on forums. But, as it's so rare to actually be able to change anyone's thinking in conversation, I prefer to vote with my feet and my wallet, (and also through positive reviews, when I can).