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sallymae
01-26-2011, 11:53 PM
In SC we have to put in 180 days of seat time to constitute a grade.. Are there any other places that require seat time as a gauge? How many have to do the state year end testing to call it complete? When do you call it a grade completed? How will this affect graduation and college entrance timing?

Teri
01-27-2011, 12:03 AM
Texas has no requirements for homeschools (or private schools, which is what a homeschool is considered).
We will call it finished when we get through this year's curriculum. Sometimes we are finishing up in April, sometimes June.

inmom
01-27-2011, 08:50 AM
Indiana requires 180 days of attendance--that's all. However, we determine what that means. Very simple.

TamaraNC
01-27-2011, 09:02 AM
NC "suggests" 180 days, but it isn't required. Nationally standardized testing is required, but they don't need to see the result.

StartingOver
01-27-2011, 09:17 AM
The "Year" is done when we break out the next level of a subject, since none of them end at the same time, I will say we end at graduation. ;-). There really in no line at the end in our home. If I had to give one, I would say February, when I purchase the bulk of our curriculum for a bit.

Texas has no requirements.

Kristina Breece
01-27-2011, 09:37 AM
Ohio requires that a parent certify that the student has had 900 hours of instruction and either a standardized test or a written narrative from an Ohio licensed teacher that says a review of the student's body of work for the year shows satisfactory progress for that student.

What they don't require is reporting at all until the school year that a child will be 6 on August 1. Aaron's birthday is in October, and Paige's is in November. With Aaron, we're starting K when he's 4 and will have moved onto 1 when he's 5. We won't have to report until he's ready to start 2nd grade. :-)

dbmamaz
01-27-2011, 10:19 AM
you dont have to stop when you reach those hours, and you can be flexible with what you count. Obey the law, but dont let the law define you or your school. You can stop if you think your kids have learned enough, or you can continue all year if that works better for you. Your kids can 'graduate' when you say they are done (in most states) and you can also send them to community college for part of high school.

Miguels mommy
01-27-2011, 10:27 AM
Miguel move up grades a week before his birthday in June, no matter what level he's at because we home-school year round. We use to live in Ohio with 900 hrs. requirement but our gauge was he had to be doing something vaguely educational for 2.5 hours a day. We do state testing or portfolio review based on his grade level not his ability. When he turns 12 he'll start taking the SAT's for end of the year test, at least that's our plan currently. His estimated graduation date is May 2020. We are hoping that when he graduates high school he also graduates with at least one two year degree. Therefore his graduation ceremony is covered and he'll have a good head start for college or life. He'll be able to 'start' college that summer or fall of his 18th birthday.

Hampchick
01-27-2011, 02:35 PM
MA requires 180 days for elementary, for High School it's 180 days or 900 hours, but there's no requirement to actually provide seat time/hours to the district. At the end of each year the district is allowed to ask for some type of assessment; testing, progress report, or work samples. From what I hear not all districts actually ask for the end of year reports. When I got approved to HS, they "requested" that I also provide an assessment in January. I haven't done it, I'm waiting to see if they push back. The laws in our state have some grey area; actually there are no laws only legal cases that set precedent.

farrarwilliams
01-27-2011, 06:00 PM
I think we have a 180 days requirement, but we're not required to keep attendance or any data about it, so I can't even remember.

Cara had the best advice - obey the law, but don't let it define your homeschool.

AddlepatedMonkeyMama
01-27-2011, 06:00 PM
MA requires 180 days for elementary, for High School it's 180 days or 900 hours, but there's no requirement to actually provide seat time/hours to the district. At the end of each year the district is allowed to ask for some type of assessment; testing, progress report, or work samples. From what I hear not all districts actually ask for the end of year reports. When I got approved to HS, they "requested" that I also provide an assessment in January. I haven't done it, I'm waiting to see if they push back. The laws in our state have some grey area; actually there are no laws only legal cases that set precedent.

We're also in MA. The info from our town specified 180 days of instruction and also said 5 hours of instruction per day (HA HA HA!). They also requested progress reports twice per year, including samples of works and daily logs (or you can opt for the state tests or an assessment by an agreed upon third party). But what they "request" and what they accept are very different. My informal poll of other homeschoolers in town found that most everyone submits one progress report each year, consisting of a list of topics covered and books/resources used. No logs, no work samples. Our town is pretty lax about reporting, in other words. :)

As for grade levels, I'm starting to feel like they're just a number that goes on the school district's forms. Grade level isn't necessarily relevent to what we're doing at home. I'm not sure how we will handle things when the kids are bigger and need transcripts and such for college applications (that's a loooooong ways away, thank goodness!).

Hampchick
01-27-2011, 07:22 PM
We're also in MA. The info from our town specified 180 days of instruction and also said 5 hours of instruction per day (HA HA HA!). They also requested progress reports twice per year, including samples of works and daily logs (or you can opt for the state tests or an assessment by an agreed upon third party). But what they "request" and what they accept are very different. My informal poll of other homeschoolers in town found that most everyone submits one progress report each year, consisting of a list of topics covered and books/resources used. No logs, no work samples. Our town is pretty lax about reporting, in other words. :)

I thought there was a # of hours for elementary here too, but could only remember the high school numbers. It's almost amusing how the district policies don't match up with what they can really expect homeschoolers to comply with. Or, it would be amusing if I didn't feel sure that some people who don't know better will give them what they request. I don't really expect to hear from them about a mid-year report but have no intention of giving them one if they do contact me.

Sam
01-28-2011, 02:45 PM
We don't have any reporting here and we don't follow school years or even grades. We school year round and school according to mastery. We are covering grades 1-6 with one child. I'm not sure what we'll do for a high school transcript. I guess we'll figure it when we get there.

ercswf
01-28-2011, 05:12 PM
My husband and I have chosen to homeschool year round taking a couple weeks straight off in June and in December. When we start back in July we will be "moving up" up in grade but really I let my kids work on what ever work is at the level they need to be working on. My kids are often asked what grade they are in so this will help them know what they should say. This year we will be naming our homeschool so when my kids are asked what school they go to, they can answer with a name of a school instead of what they normally say which is "School is lame I don't go."

AddlepatedMonkeyMama
01-28-2011, 06:40 PM
This year we will be naming our homeschool so when my kids are asked what school they go to, they can answer with a name of a school instead of what they normally say which is "School is lame I don't go."

I'm sure you get some horrified looks when they say that! :)

I have been trying to think of a name, too. The kids want [name of our street] Elementary School. But I think that is lame! I'm working on something alliterative, like Laughing Lyceum.

ercswf
01-29-2011, 09:20 AM
I'm insisting my kids come up with a name other then the one they chose or else my husband and I are going to have to name the school. My boys want the "The School of Smartness)

Yes, we get some looks the other day I had a cashier start questioning me about why my kids were not in school and my 8 year old took over the response. Needless to say the lady felt stupid after he got on to her about "questioning his mothers judgement and ways of parenting".

Hampchick
01-29-2011, 10:44 PM
Yes, we get some looks the other day I had a cashier start questioning me about why my kids were not in school and my 8 year old took over the response. Needless to say the lady felt stupid after he got on to her about "questioning his mothers judgement and ways of parenting".

Oh my! Would I have enjoyed being behind you in line.

BrendaE
02-07-2011, 09:07 PM
This is one of the bigger worries of new home schoolers. The fact is, as you will see for yourself over the years, is that paper is all the school you have to report to wants. So write up a pre planned schedule of days and hours. Even complete attendance lists before the day s even happen. Get all of the "paperwork" out of the way (sans state testing etc). What you ACTUALLY do in the privacy of your own home or WHATEVER changes you make to what youre teaching, when and for how long... they will never even know. Being able to leave off thinking about all the paperwork requirements will give you such peace of mind. Also.. if youre home schooling and spend an ACTUAL 900 hours doing work... well youre going to get through at least 2 whole grades. The kids just go faster and work gets done in much less time (normally). This will leave you free to take days off when you need it OR even alternate days you teach each child if you have 2 that need direct teaching. No one need be the wiser and YES you will still get everything done. Just without the stress. So.. paperwork, CHECK.. then live life for yourselves as that is a huge home school benefit! Enjoy it!


*High School has some different rules however.