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Stella M
01-16-2011, 04:36 AM
What would you concentrate on teaching/doing with her this year ? She is 11, turning 12 mid-year.

I already know she needs to do a lot of math catch-up. We also need to work on her sleep schedule so that she can wake up in time to get to school. What else ?

Busygoddess
01-16-2011, 05:00 AM
Well, in addition to making sure she's caught up in all subjects, I'd get her used to tests. She'll need to take tests in public school, so making sure she has some experience may help prevent test anxiety. I would make sure she has got experience with a variety of test questions - mutiple choice, T/F, essay, short answer, etc. I would focus on study skills, note taking, and test taking skills. I would also spend some time on organizational & time management skills, to make sure she can keep her schoolwork organized & use her time efficiently (so she still has time for a life after school and homework). For my dd, I would also have to work on making sure she was able to sit still, be quiet, and not interrupt the teacher.

These are just some general ideas. Hope they help. :)

MarkInMD
01-16-2011, 10:08 AM
Time management, definitely. This is something I always have to remind my kids about. And unfortunately tests are going to be a fact of life, so the sooner she gets used to the nature of the beast (if she isn't already) the better.

Shoe
01-16-2011, 10:41 AM
What would you concentrate on teaching/doing with her this year ? She is 11, turning 12 mid-year.

I already know she needs to do a lot of math catch-up. We also need to work on her sleep schedule so that she can wake up in time to get to school. What else ?

Wow, this thread could have been started by me-my daughter just turned 12 and wants to go back to public school next year, so I'm wondering if I'm doing the right things to align her with the public school curriculum. And the sleep schedule is going to be a really big deal for her-she is not a morning person at all!

farrarwilliams
01-16-2011, 11:25 AM
I don't know what the curriculum is like is Australia, but here in the US, I wouldn't worry about aligning to the curriculum other than in math - and even then, only to a certain extent. For things like writing, history, and science, then it's the improvement of skills and the building of knowledge that matters most instead of a certain sequence. If kids are focused on a certain type of writing or a certain history or science subject, then just because you did something different shouldn't matter too much assuming a child can apply knowledge and learn new skills. If anything, if you feel the schools are too focused on something it may make sense to do the opposite so the kid gets exposure to it. For example, if I knew my kids were about to go to school, I absolutely wouldn't do any US history because American schools do tons of US history at every level. I would focus on world history instead.

But yeah, math and general organization skills would be what I would focus on.

Shoe
01-16-2011, 11:27 AM
I don't know what the curriculum is like is Australia, but here in the US, I wouldn't worry about aligning to the curriculum other than in math - and even then, only to a certain extent. For things like writing, history, and science, then it's the improvement of skills and the building of knowledge that matters most instead of a certain sequence. If kids are focused on a certain type of writing or a certain history or science subject, then just because you did something different shouldn't matter too much assuming a child can apply knowledge and learn new skills. If anything, if you feel the schools are too focused on something it may make sense to do the opposite so the kid gets exposure to it. For example, if I knew my kids were about to go to school, I absolutely wouldn't do any US history because American schools do tons of US history at every level. I would focus on world history instead.

But yeah, math and general organization skills would be what I would focus on.

You make some good points, and it gives me a bit of relief, since I am not really following the order of the public school curriculum this year, except in math.

Teri
01-16-2011, 12:57 PM
For us, I would be working on the TEKS skills that the state has on the level that she would be for this year.

farrarwilliams
01-16-2011, 01:04 PM
One more thought... when I was teaching, we got a few kids who were entering school after being homeschooled for many years. Most of them were slightly behind in math and good at creative writing, but not so much at analytical writing, though they could catch up easily. In the US, at least, there's no national curriculum and mobility is such that kids often have different skill and knowledge sets and teachers are prepared to deal with and accept it - so former homeschoolers having a different skill set is usually okay (the exception I think is really math, where kids have to be able to keep up with the level in which they're placed and that means having similar knowledge to everyone else in the class upon which to build) assuming they can be organized and keep up. For those former homeschooled kids, there was always this month or so where we were constantly having to tell them to do really basic things, like change classes, or go with the group or things like that.

Stella M
01-16-2011, 05:14 PM
Corrigan, you're right. And if mood swings are anything to go by - yes, she needs her adolescent sleep. I think we'll ignore sleep until the next lot of summer holidays (11 months away ) and do a sleep boot camp then...

Tests - why didn't I think of tests ? Oh God, this year is going to be fun...not. I hate tests. Why is my daughter doing this to me ? And why can't I be the kind of mother who just says no ?

So - maths, tests, writing skills, time management, explaining to her how to act like a "normal" student, sleep adjustments 6 weeks before - anything else ?

You know, now I'm actually thinking about the things that need to be thought about, I feel quite sad - and even worse - unable to join in random conversation. I don't want her to go.

Stella M
01-16-2011, 05:21 PM
I think she'll do OK with the mechanics of the school day. She is used to hanging out at dance and taking instruction from teachers, doing exams, talking to friends, moving from class to class.

We will all find homework difficult.

Shoe, hope it all works out with your dd and that she changes her mind!!! That's what I'm hoping for here but it isn't likely :(

Dd wants to go for the social aspect. I feel so disappointed that homeschooling couldn't provide that for her.

Stella M
01-16-2011, 06:51 PM
O.M.G. Just read the info booklet for new students. I had forgotten that schools are run like prisons and that you have to do things like get a permission to go to the toilet and that not wearing uniform is punishable. Thankfully, eldest dd just shook her head when I told her about the toilet thing. Eldest dd and ds have zero desire for school.

Maybe I should have asked what I should be doing this year to prepare myself for school. Coming to terms with a child actively embracing mindless authority isn't easy.

farrarwilliams
01-16-2011, 07:53 PM
Maybe I should have asked what I should be doing this year to prepare myself for school. Coming to terms with a child actively embracing mindless authority isn't easy.

I don't think I'd be able to do it. I want to respect my kids' wishes and I'd like to believe I'd be okay with them deciding to go to school in a few years. But the truth is... I'd probably spend the whole time before they went pouting about it and saying really immature things about how school rots your brain.

Stella M
01-16-2011, 10:43 PM
Pouting ? Immature ? Me ?

All that. Sigh.

Friend we saw today gives her 6 months. She said getting up early in winter will do the trick. So there is hope! Poor kid, she's never been to school so she just doesn't get the loss of autonomy involved. Hard way to learn...

As well as the 'preparation for school' stuff, I've asked her to decide on a subject or a project she's always wanted to do and we'll spend some time on that as well. I'm going to try - again - to find a social circle for her. Maybe if this year goes well she might reconsider - last year was a tough one and not likely to inspire love of homeschooling.

Stella M
01-17-2011, 03:44 AM
Today was my research in front of the computer day and it was awful. I was looking for alternative schools but there are none in Sydney for high school. The three public schools she could attend all have identical policies on things like uniform, homework, attendance. One even required parents to sign a form agreeing to enforce uniforms. Brainwashing. These are state schools and uniforms aren't compulsory, just strongly suggested. Yeah, to the point of getting parents to do their dirty work. Reading their websites reminded me why I hate schools.

Talk about being between a rock and a hard place! I really feel like ignoring dd till she comes to her senses but that isn't really an option. Ironically, when I was in high school, I begged my parents to let me homeschool. They, of course, said no.

Amerikiwimom
01-17-2011, 06:00 AM
Melissa,

I don't know if you're a member of HEA but they have a contact for a secular homeschooling group in NSW in Northern Sydney. Have you tried contacting them? They might be an avenue to assist you in providing the social side of home schooling that she's missing.

Here's the link http://www.hea.asn.au/resources/disp_res_sg.asp?type=3&id=933

Jill

Stella M
01-17-2011, 06:42 AM
Thanks Jill,
I'll check out the link. I'm happy to travel :)

higgledypiggledy
01-18-2011, 04:55 AM
I'm guessing one of the reasons your daughter felt confident making this request, is that you raised her to be independant in her thinking and actions. So it only stand to reason that she is now asserting her independence with confidence because of the skills you given her. Ironically, I guessing it is only her ignorance about public school, that makes it so appealing. The confidence and independance you've nurtured might be less than appreciated by both instructors and fellow students. Maybe she'll be socially wise enough and gregarious enough to overcome this difficulty or she might realize that she doen't want to sacrifice her independance for the sake of a wider circle of aquaintances. I taught in high school before becoming a world educator. Don't worry too much about preparation. I don't know about where you live but in the US, test prep is now built into the curriculum. It is almost a subject unto itself. Don't do tests if you don't want to. From week two she will be getting all sorts of strategies to beat the test. I would focus on analytical thinking, not because I believe homeschoolers to lag in this area, but because most PS do such a poor job of teaching it. I agree that if she is behind in math, it should be an area of focus. I would also make your remaining time as fun as possible. Let her explore all the stuff that intrigues her, so she can clearly understand what she is trading it in for when school starts next year. Good Luck.

Pefa
01-18-2011, 08:38 AM
It is so tough to let go of your children. I hope your proud of yourself that you've raised a dd confident enough to make a choice she knows you don't like but that's right for her. The world is fraught with peril and it's so easy for our mama imaginations (which only come up with horrific scenarios) to go into overdrive.

Often times the only way our daughters can figure out who they are is by being not mom. Which is tough on mom. Fortunately it isn't a permanent state.

As higgledypiggedly said, you've raised a lovely confident daughter, I'm sure she'll do well in school. Having friends is good. Learning what the trade offs in life are is a useful skill.

Good luck