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Topsy
01-04-2017, 08:53 PM
I wondered if anyone is aware of any graphic novels that are specifically written as reading "tools" for kids with learning differences? Or maybe not even specifically written with that purpose in mind, but maybe you've noticed a graphic novel series that your child has had success with where they might not have with other publications?

fastweedpuller
01-05-2017, 04:24 PM
My daughter was slow to read (it's the reason we're homeschooling). I think it caused her a lot of anxiety, as there was a book club in the class, and she had to talk about what she'd read. (This was in 1st-2nd grade, and they were chapter books like The Kite Runner and Tales of a Fourth-Grade Nothing...not exactly reads to be done independently by a 6-7 year old, and yet another reason we homeschool)

So we tried comics (bust). But what really got her going was the graphic novel translation about a bunch of feral cats (the Warriors (http://www.warriorcats.com/) by Erin Hunter) and she felt some success. Reading was really slow for her to "get" though...she had to be motivated. Things like Minecraft (yes) and having to read for homeschool did help, but I think it was only toward the middle of 4th grade that she felt she was fluent.

Carmaline
01-05-2017, 05:13 PM
My daughter has dyslexia and is now in seventh grade. I believe it was in second grade that she discovered the Baby Mouse series of books. It had a comic book format. She likes Warrior Cat books right now.

Elly
01-05-2017, 05:56 PM
No, but I know that graphic novels in general are touted as being good for reluctant readers. Our libraries have always had an excellent selection. I'm not sure how intimidating it might be for a kid who is struggling to go and look through the whole selection, but I do think that it's one of those areas where choices are so personal. Although DS also loved Babymouse. Owly is another series that has few words, but is all about 'reading' the pictures and emotions. Probably loads of others, too. Garfield got him reading in the first place.

Elly

Topsy
01-05-2017, 08:46 PM
But what really got her going was the graphic novel translation about a bunch of feral cats (the Warriors (http://www.warriorcats.com/) by Erin Hunter) and she felt some success.

This series is foreign to me, so I'm glad you introduced me to it. How cool that there is even a movie in the works, too. Sounds like the perfect time to get started on those.


My daughter has dyslexia and is now in seventh grade. I believe it was in second grade that she discovered the Baby Mouse series of books. It had a comic book format. She likes Warrior Cat books right now.

Second opinion for Warrior Cats. This sounds great!

farrarwilliams
01-05-2017, 10:36 PM
I don't know of any that are specifically for kids with dyslexia. I'd just look at all the lists of good graphic novels and go from there. There's soooooo much out there now. I mean, I can give specific suggestions - Amulet, everything by Raina Telgemeier, Babymouse, El Deafo, the new Ms. Marvels... but not knowing the age and interests, it's hard to say exactly...

Elly
01-06-2017, 07:30 AM
everything by Raina Telgemeier, Babymouse, El Deafo,

Last night I reshelved a number of DS's graphic novels. I noticed how many are autobiographical (or loosely so). He doesn't have El Deafo (but has had it from the library multiple times), Roller Girl, Raina Telgemeier (who we met at the Texas Book festival!), and The Dumbest Idea Ever (Jimmy Gownley about becoming a writer), and that's just off the top of my head.

Elly

farrarwilliams
01-06-2017, 05:36 PM
Last night I reshelved a number of DS's graphic novels. I noticed how many are autobiographical (or loosely so). He doesn't have El Deafo (but has had it from the library multiple times), Roller Girl, Raina Telgemeier (who we met at the Texas Book festival!), and The Dumbest Idea Ever (Jimmy Gownley about becoming a writer), and that's just off the top of my head.

Elly

It's interesting, right? Of course, there are lots of non-memoir gn's - even ones that are contemporary, though a lot more fantasy - but there are a surprising number of memoirs out there.

Topsy
01-06-2017, 08:32 PM
I keep thinking that over time someone must have created a specific LD-geared series or curricula surrounding GNs. If not, to me there's a gap there. Someone needs to jump on the idea of creating a structured reading/grammar intervention program that ties into graphic novels. Besides being super helpful for kids who aren't traditional readers/spellers/etc, it would make the learning so much more engaging. I've done a good bit of googling, but either I'm not using my google-fu correctly, or it simply doesn't yet exist.

I'm thrilled that there are so many great indys and series out there now, though! What a boon!