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MelissaPA
09-01-2016, 09:26 PM
This doesn't only have to be for pre-readers, but I have a pre-reader and I am looking for a book of classic, fairly short poems that are entirely non-religious. Does anyone have a favorite?

alexsmom
09-01-2016, 10:33 PM
Our favorites are the books by Shel Silverstein, and this illustrated compilation of animal poems we probably got from a recommendation here: https://www.amazon.com/Beauty-Beast-Poems-Animal-Kingdom/dp/067987058X/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1472782999&sr=8-4
This book is another awesome compilation in my opinion, but its a Waldorf favorite, and it has the occassional poem with the word God in it. But, it also contains translated verses from the Veda(s?) and the Egyptian Book of the Dead.
https://www.amazon.com/Journey-Through-Time-Verse-Rhyme/dp/0863152716/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1472783116&sr=8-1&keywords=a+journey+through+time+in+verse+and+rhyme

I like how you can look up poems by topic (learning the alphabet, animals, month of the year, etc).
My sensitive allerjesus arent bothered, for what that's worth.
Waldorf is big on imagery and metaphor*, which I like in poems. :)

* And on being a secret cult.

Miriamhokie
09-01-2016, 10:35 PM
My son really liked Shel Silverstein's poetry around that age. He even dictated a whole bunch of poems in similar style to his babysitter one evening.

TFZ
09-01-2016, 10:41 PM
When DS was 3 and 4 he loved listening to AA Milne's poetry. One was Now We are Six. I can't remember the other one. We had two along with the Pooh books.

farrarwilliams
09-02-2016, 08:45 PM
I think you want an anthology, yes? I don't remember there being anything religious at all in Read Aloud Rhymes for the Very Young, which is edited by Jack Prelutsky (who else?). It's not so much "classic" poetry though it includes some - more like children's poetry. I don't know of any for that that don't include longer works, though in anthologies for children, a "longer work" is relative. We're not talking Rime of the Ancient Mariner here. For classic poetry for older kids in general, I like the Barefoot Book of Classic Poems, which has lovely illustrations, but some of them have religious themes or allusions. I also love, love both the Caroline Kennedy anthologies, both of which were illustrated by Jon Muth, but I don't have them in front of me so I can't promise none of them have religious allusions - it's such a wide variety of poems that I'm almost sure a couple of them do. Classic poetry and no religious allusions at all don't exactly go hand in hand, honestly. Still, I'd look at those. They're so beautiful and they really are secular in intention. You can always skip things if you're uncomfortable.

For individual names for secular children's poetry, Jane Yolen has some lovely things for that age range and Prelutsky has a few cute things too. My kids didn't appreciate Silverstein until they were slightly older, more like 5 yo. And then you can get into Marilyn Singer and Judith Viorst and so forth too.

MelissaPA
09-03-2016, 08:02 AM
It doesn't matter if it is an anthology or something by just one author. I am just looking for a book from which we can read a page a day. Thanks for these replies!

crazyme
09-03-2016, 11:10 AM
The Tree That Time Built
Winter Poems
The Poetry for Young People series (goes by poet)
Song of the Water Boatman (great artwork!)

TFZ
09-03-2016, 05:33 PM
Today I ton of books from a teacher friend who is retiring. One was The Random House Book of Poetry for Children (https://smile.amazon.com/Random-House-Book-Poetry-Children/dp/0394850106/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1472938224&sr=1-1&keywords=the+random+house+book+of+poetry+for+child ren). It looks pretty good. Might be what you're looking for.

Mariam
09-04-2016, 08:14 PM
Classical poetry frequency has references to religion, it is just part of the tradition.

That being said, some of my favorite anthologies are:

Poems to Learn by Heart and A Family of Poems: My Favorite Poetry for Children both are edited by Caroline Kennedy
Random House Book of Poetry for Children

A Child's Garden of Verses by Robert Louis Stevenson

This one is a fun one, as it comes with a cd and poetry from the book is read
Child's Introduction to Poetry: Listen While You Learn About the Magic Words That Have Moved Mountains, Won Battles, and Made Us Laugh and Cry


A silly one, that is also a classic is A Book of Nonsense by Edward Lear

NZ_Mama
10-20-2016, 04:34 AM
Just reading this and love all the suggestions, we love poetry books. Another one for silly poems is Spike Milligan, some have the odd swear word in them that we just skip over. We have The Book of Milliganimals and Fleas, Knees, and Hidden Elephants. I remember mum reading us a lot of Spike Milligan poetry, among other poetry, and really enjoying it. She has lots of great kids poetry books from when we were kids, one I can't recall the name of but its all silly poems about animals. For example, one about honey bees that has lines like "Some creatures have a bottom, but the honey bees ain't got em, they've got a sting right where their bot should be". I will have to check what it is called next time we are round there.

JenWrites
10-20-2016, 12:19 PM
Classical poetry frequency has references to religion, it is just part of the tradition.

That being said, some of my favorite anthologies are:

Poems to Learn by Heart and A Family of Poems: My Favorite Poetry for Children both are edited by Caroline Kennedy
Random House Book of Poetry for Children

A Child's Garden of Verses by Robert Louis Stevenson

This one is a fun one, as it comes with a cd and poetry from the book is read
Child's Introduction to Poetry: Listen While You Learn About the Magic Words That Have Moved Mountains, Won Battles, and Made Us Laugh and Cry


A silly one, that is also a classic is A Book of Nonsense by Edward Lear


I have to second Poems to Learn By Heart. Beautiful collection. I can't remember if it's completely god-free or not, as I don't worry too much about religious references in literature or poetry (just keep that shit out mah textbooks), but it's such a lovely book.

Andie
02-06-2017, 05:15 AM
My boys (5 & 2) love Wriggle and Roar by Julia Donaldson. Actually anything by Julia Donaldson is a winner in our house. Here is a list of her poetry volumes from the author's website Poems and Songs written by children's author, Julia Donaldson (http://www.juliadonaldson.co.uk/poems.htm)

TFZ
02-10-2017, 09:10 AM
A little god-ish at the beginning, but then shows different cultures beliefs - it's all in the delivery, lol. Animals, Animals by Eric Carle is a good one. A shorter collection. They have it in the BYL K curriculum, and DS5 has really enjoyed it.

kmcentire
08-21-2017, 09:09 PM
Read to me by Judi Moreillon.

BellaH
07-02-2018, 04:15 AM
The "classical method" varies a little depending on who you talk to. The book, "The Well Trained Mind" has some good information, but I recommend being flexible in applying what it says. Its fine to switch things around, or do a little less writing, or use a different Phonics program then the book recommends. The basics of a classical education are:
1 It is based on the Trivium, (Google it, its too long to explain here, but it describes 3 stages of education / childhood development Grammar, Logic, Rhetoric. Grammar is the the building blocks of each subject, Logic is learning to think critically about the subjects, Rhetoric is learning to articulate what you learned.)
2. History is taught chronologically.
3. It is rich in quality Literature.
4. Includes the study of ancient languages.

As far as teaching Latin, it is easier to teach Latin than a modern language because pronunciation is not really very important. You can stress pronunciation if you wish, but mostly you are going to focusing on reading, writing, and translating, as opposed to speaking. There are courses that start at the very beginning, and do not assume that the parent knows Latin.

I teach my children by a blend of the Classical Method and Charlotte Mason Methods, both are very similar, but they do differ on a few key points, and on those points the two methods are polar opposites, in those areas I have taken a middle of the road approach instead of going with one extreme or the other.

One such area is Memorization, while classical education tends to have the child memorize and memorize and memorize, often material that won't be useful, Charlotte Mason method states plainly that "children are people not parrots" and shies away from memorization unless its really necessary. I take a middle of the road approach, having my kids memorize things that I feel will be useful or edifying to them. Such as key dates in History, Math Facts, Bible verses, some poetry, etc. I don't think reciting the names of all the Egyptian Pharaohs is likely to come in handy.

A great book on blending the two methods is, "When You Rise Up" by R.C. Sproul Jr.

Also, if you want to see some projects and such that can be fit into the classical method, feel free to drop by my blog. http://www.homeschoolblogger.com/PathofL...

I don't know if you are approaching this from a secular classical or Christian classical point of view, so there aren't that many books I can recommend to you. However, "Story of the World" is a great History resource regardless of which point of view you come from.