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HobbitinaHobbitHole
05-08-2016, 09:22 PM
My son is autistic and I am trying to plan out next year's 6th grade curriculum. He is supposed to be doing world history. I am hoping it will go better than US history did.

What I am looking for is something as visual, colorful and as fun as possible to supplement Crash Course World History. My son really could not care less about history,and is not especially interested in people individually much less when they do things like form groups, associations, countries, political parties etc.

We are also going to be covering the elections, world-wide current events and that kind of thing. World geography will be fine. It is the people part that is the problem. We are also working separately on social issues, and I know I could count that as social studies in a truer sense; but I would like to also cover a curriculum so he builds up a tolerance for it.

alexsmom
05-08-2016, 09:35 PM
Ive never gotten my DS10 to take any interest in history.
Does yours like videos? Ive had better luck by reading the textbooks myself, then finding videos to match the subjects. And I point out key points from the text. Somehow even a 50 min video and discussion is easier to swallow than 20 minutes of reading and discussion.
So find a text you can use as scope and sequence, then just do a pbs / amazon prime / netflix / youtube / etc search for the keywords. Theres a zillion things out there.

Otherwise, meh, Im thinking history is overrated at this age.

JenWrites
05-09-2016, 12:30 AM
Have you looked into Horrible Histories at all? That might be an appealing option.

alexsmom
05-09-2016, 01:09 AM
Oh yah, we have the complete Horrible Histories with the specials on DVD and the big box set... how can anyone not like those!

HobbitinaHobbitHole
05-09-2016, 11:25 AM
Ive never gotten my DS10 to take any interest in history.
Does yours like videos? Ive had better luck by reading the textbooks myself, then finding videos to match the subjects. And I point out key points from the text. Somehow even a 50 min video and discussion is easier to swallow than 20 minutes of reading and discussion.
So find a text you can use as scope and sequence, then just do a pbs / amazon prime / netflix / youtube / etc search for the keywords. Theres a zillion things out there.

Otherwise, meh, Im thinking history is overrated at this age.

He has visual interpretation issues with live video which is why we do Crash Course. It also has a heavy cartoon component as well as a high silliness factor and plenty of opportunities to explain sarcasm :) It is supposed to be HS level, so it is not ideal, but I figure we are spiraling through anyway, so if it takes more repetition, that is OK.

HobbitinaHobbitHole
05-09-2016, 11:28 AM
Have you looked into Horrible Histories at all? That might be an appealing option.

I was thinking of revisiting these. Last time I looked (last year), it was "too gross" for him. He is also squeamish and doesn't like things that are mean or scary which really adversely effects how much history I can teach, or at least the level of detail.

alexsmom
05-09-2016, 11:37 AM
I found the Crash Course videos too high of a level for my 4th grader, although he enjoys them, and at less than 15 minutes each, it doesnt hurt. I just dont expect any learning to take place from them. (We have looked at them for World History, US History, and Chemistry.)

HobbitinaHobbitHole
05-09-2016, 02:14 PM
I found the Crash Course videos too high of a level for my 4th grader, although he enjoys them, and at less than 15 minutes each, it doesnt hurt. I just dont expect any learning to take place from them. (We have looked at them for World History, US History, and Chemistry.)

Yeah, I am not expecting my son to understand all the content in Crash Course. It works on a 40 ft level, and certain things will stick in his brain because of the delivery. I mainly use it because he is at least willing to use it. Right now, I am happy if he willingly engages the material because that is the only we we can discuss it at all.

Most people seem to do well with literature-based approaches which my son hates even more than the dry boring stuff, which he is also not a big fan of. So that leaves us cartoons like School House Rock (which we outgrew, and does not cover world history at all, Crash Course and not much else. My son is also very immature and everything gross scares him, so it gives me very little to work with.

On the plus side, I don't know if you are aware, but Crash Course Science for Kids came out this year, and it is very good. It doesn't cover as much as I would like, yet, but it is very engaging to my child, at least.

alexsmom
05-09-2016, 02:52 PM
Could he color? Dover seems to make coloring books for everything.
Amazon.com: world history coloring book (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=world+history+coloring+book)

Would he learn if you read aloud to him while he colors?



Or maybe approach world history through some other perspective? History of Science, Art, Music? I think Ive even seen history of Math.
For 6th grade, hes not expected to know dates and names, ready for an AP exam. Just familiarity with the world and a general understanding that the people differ in it, and who gets along with whom.

HobbitinaHobbitHole
05-10-2016, 09:34 AM
Could he color? Dover seems to make coloring books for everything.
Amazon.com: world history coloring book (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=world+history+coloring+book)

Would he learn if you read aloud to him while he colors?



Or maybe approach world history through some other perspective? History of Science, Art, Music? I think Ive even seen history of Math.
For 6th grade, hes not expected to know dates and names, ready for an AP exam. Just familiarity with the world and a general understanding that the people differ in it, and who gets along with whom.

Coloring would be a good idea, but he doesn't color so much as doodles electronic equipment and then quizzes me about its features. This would distract us, needless to say. You are exactly right about my goals: I want him to be familiar with the world, and how people form groups and interact in it. Because of his particular flavor of autism, that makes it more difficult and yet more necessary if you know what I mean. So aside from the usual issues we have with non-favored, we also have that hurdle to get around.

He is much better at memorizing dates and that kind of thing than understanding the social aspect. I guess I hoping that through exposure, that it will at least plant a seed that will grow once the light comes on. I want him to start to learn to ask the questions at least, if not necessarily understanding the answers. At the very least, I am hoping he can understand the economic motivations and understand actions that are resource-driven. We did econ, this year, because it is more mathy and less people-oriented once you know the underlying assumptions.

skrink
05-10-2016, 09:58 AM
My dd is an Aspie. She is such a black and white thinker that history tends to fill her with rage - the cycles of injustice and violence are appalling in general, and to her nearly unbearably so. The only way history has ever worked for us is by tying it in to dd's passion, which is science & tech. We look at the evolution of scientific understanding throughout the ages (Joy Hakim's The Story of Science is wonderful, if that would interest your son), and she gets a general idea of other historical events in relation to that evolution. It's taken years to get there, but I'm satisfied. I want to focus on civics this coming year. So few people really understand how the gov't works. I don't want her to be one of them, but it's going to be a struggle. Politics are so polarizing, especially in particular election year, that it's going to be hard to find a way to balance it all. We may just do dry and dull and attempt to avoid the issues. Cue icivics.

pdpele
05-10-2016, 06:02 PM
I scrolled thru to suggest world history thru science/tech if that would interest your son more - but Skrink beat me to it!

I think Build Your Library has a middle grades curriculum that is world hx of science focused - at least maybe a good stop for a book list if you think this might work.

skrink
05-10-2016, 08:53 PM
I scrolled thru to suggest world history thru science/tech if that would interest your son more - but Skrink beat me to it!

I think Build Your Library has a middle grades curriculum that is world hx of science focused - at least maybe a good stop for a book list if you think this might work.

Yes! BYL grade 8 is The History of Science. We used it this year and it has been BY FAR the best year we've had. It couldn't have been better suited to her. BYL is Charlotte Mason based, so be warned - there's a whole lot of reading. If you're kid loves to read it's a wonderful choice. If not, you could still buy the curriculum (way cheap, the big cost is buying the books) and scavenge what will work for you.

HobbitinaHobbitHole
05-11-2016, 03:46 PM
The science route is something I may do in the future also. We tried Big History for a little bit, but again Crash Course was the beat resource for us. It was mixed because of all the anthropology etc. If I did a history of technology (some of which is in our science curriculum) I know it would be a hit, but it would not help him learn about people, government and civics, which is maybe something I should just kick the can on.

mamaraby
05-15-2016, 01:08 PM
Have you looked into Horrible Histories at all? That might be an appealing option.

And if the videos are not a good fit, what about the books? They wouldn't be colorful as a general rule, but there are a few volumes that are in color.

There's also "The Cartoon History..." series.

Make his own big wall timeline to help keep things straight? Created mind maps or use graphic organizers to help draw those connections? That's maybe only helpful if he's kind of creative or creative-ish.

What interests does he have? I'd probably try to find a way to link those together so that history study is through the lens of his existing passions/interests.

HobbitinaHobbitHole
05-18-2016, 09:29 PM
His interests are math and science and he is also hyperlexic so he loves different /lettering/syllable and numbersystems. I am already planning on doing a unit on different alphabet and numbering systems --ancient and modern. We will be doing hands-on activities like making a quipu which is an Incan recording system based on knots. This will help with fine motor skills too, I hope. We also will be focusing on technical development. I expect those aspects to go well.

My main worry is when I have to talk about governments and people. He won't care who led what country whenm what country fought with what other country or why a government might fall. For example, I recently tried watching the Horrible History videos and he liked the one on Kings and Queens because of the silliness factor and the writing on the screen but he is not the least bit interested in anything having to do with British (or any) royalty or in learning more about them. It is doubtful he would retain the information.

I know the question is why don't I just teach the things he is willing to learn, which is a valid, and something I am asking myself, frankly. Part of the reason is I think it is important to understand history; the other is I would like him to go to college or get a legitimate degree online or something. e will have to take classes like literature and history he does not like. I think if anything he needs more help than other kids to get to a place where is capable of retaining and analyzing motivations. He does not understand this intuitively at all.

alexsmom
05-18-2016, 10:06 PM
For planning out 6th grade, dont sweat whether he is going to remember the details. This is what the hardest part of *teaching* history has been for me (mine is going into 5th). Remembering the Incas were the knot people and had complex hieroglyphics and oh yah, were in south america and thrived until evil xtians came in and murdered and enslaved the people - is about the best Id hope for.
The idea is to give him the shapes, flavors, and stories / patterns that happen through history, not to be able to tell you the difference between Henry V and Henry VIII.

Your plan seems great, I wish I could send my boy over to you for history class!

ScienceGeek
05-19-2016, 02:40 AM
If he's happy with Crash Course I would just do that, maybe Brainpop? My 13 year old used to watch a couple of those every day til he'd memorized almost all of them and finally stopped watching just this past year. I wouldn't sweat it if he's not interested, I think history is better learned when you're an adult personally - at least I'm getting sooo much more out now that I'm actually learning it with my boys.

HobbitinaHobbitHole
05-19-2016, 03:52 PM
Yeah, maybe I am expecting too much. I know that when I was in 6th grade we were expected to regurgitate the details of western civ in essay form, and I don't think he will be able to do the same, even verbally, with leading questions. So, of course I am panicking. I think what I am going to need to do is just find a visually colorful (but not gory) world world history 80 ft fly-over book just as an exercise, and then figure out one or two main points per culture, per broad time period, I am going to want to reinforce and then just try to make the rest as fun as I can.

Thank you for helping me hash this out. :heart:

alexsmom
05-19-2016, 07:14 PM
If he's happy with Crash Course I would just do that, maybe Brainpop? My 13 year old used to watch a couple of those every day til he'd memorized almost all of them and finally stopped watching just this past year. I wouldn't sweat it if he's not interested, I think history is better learned when you're an adult personally - at least I'm getting sooo much more out now that I'm actually learning it with my boys.

Im finding that same thing! Im learning and understanding it way better than I did even with AP US History in High School.

Carmaline
06-13-2016, 08:53 PM
My 12 year old DD is an Aspie and I totally get where you're coming from. History is always a struggle for us. I haven't ordered it yet, but Visualize World Geography looks amazing. Someone mentioned Brain Pop which is good, and I've also heard good things about How the States got their Shapes. School House Rock has a few history videos(I'm just a Bill:))