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View Full Version : Very ironic with a state ballot initiative



Wilma
10-18-2010, 08:49 PM
State Question 744 is an initiative to put more money in the public schools. No one, including the governor whose wife is a former teacher, supports this unless they are in the Teacher's Union. The powers that be in support of this initiative have run TV commercials and sent out literature on the thing. The irony? Most of the kids in the commercial are in my dds' homeschool drama class. The students who posed for pictures as public school students who are sad about our public schools are homeschoolers!

MamaB2C
10-18-2010, 11:25 PM
I don't know that I could resist the temptation to rework that post slightly and send it as a letter to the editor to all major news papers

Pefa
10-19-2010, 08:17 AM
That is too funny. I don't think I could resist publicizing this little fact either.

Shoe
10-19-2010, 12:22 PM
That's just too funny.

wild_destiny
10-19-2010, 02:08 PM
Go figure! :) Those poor, poor "sad" (pretend) public school kids!

InstinctiveMom
10-19-2010, 05:07 PM
No comment on the politicin', but the fact that the kids are homeschooled? That's awesome :)
~h

Lperky
10-23-2010, 09:02 PM
I love the fact that the kids are homeschooled, but I have to ask: what's wrong with more money for the public schools? As a former teacher, I know firsthand how much schools and teachers need more funds. Not everyone has the luxury of homeschooling, and our kids will have to live and work with a population who may grow into under-educated adults. Sorry if I missed something!

Wilma
10-23-2010, 10:11 PM
One of the biggest problems with the initiative is that there is no language creating oversight as to how the money is to be spent. The districts can spend it however they want. It doesn't have to go to the classroom at all - it can go straight to the administration at the highest level and still be used legally.

As a former teacher, I found it very frustrating how much money went to administration, but those of us on the front lines got little or no money from these initiatives, and when we did get the money, we had no say in how it needed to be used. This initiative again puts the onus on the classroom teacher with no means of support. Additionally, this is an unfunded bill. No one has stated where the money is coming from aside from having to cut other services.

It is a very poorly written piece of legislation.

MamaB2C
10-24-2010, 02:13 AM
My county recently emergency voted in a 1% sales tax to "save" the schools from a serious budget crisis. The commercials for it were all about how they were cutting programs and laying off teachers. I refrained from voting because when I actually checked the budget (public record, fellow county citizens!), not one administrative job or salary had been cut, not even one of the army of unempowered assistants who run blockade for the deciders...also their salaries were really, really high for the region and size of the district.

archibael
10-24-2010, 04:10 AM
I'm a fan of teacher pay, but the week after the 1% sales tax increase "to avoid cuts for schools" passed referendum in my state happened to be the last week of school, and the children learned absolutely nothing since they spent the entire week playing games and watching videos. It kinda left a bad taste in my mouth and made me more than a bit reluctant to vote for such measures in the future.

MamaB2C
10-24-2010, 11:22 AM
I love the fact that the kids are homeschooled, but I have to ask: what's wrong with more money for the public schools? As a former teacher, I know firsthand how much schools and teachers need more funds. Not everyone has the luxury of homeschooling, and our kids will have to live and work with a population who may grow into under-educated adults. Sorry if I missed something!

We, as taxpayers, have little say in how funds are spent and they quite often never make it anywhere near a kid or classroom, and are spent on standardized testing costs, administrative costs, contracts (many of which are shady, overpriced, and politically motivated), biased textbooks. School boards are often elected non-educators,

Here (http://www.donorschoose.org/) is a website where teachers ask for public donations for classroom supplies, you choose which project to fund directly.

Wilma
10-24-2010, 03:05 PM
I found it very frustrating as a teacher to hear about all these wonderful measures to get more money to the classrooms. The money hardly ever got to me. I may have gotten the budget for 2 more packs of construction paper. Or it was earmarked to use for things I had little time to implement because the ELS programs were non-existent, or I had to somehow make the curriculum I could not change work for my special ed students who got no help, the gifted students whose special program was a pull-out program where they made gingerbread houses, or funding another workday where I learned nothing in seminars I had to attend on programs I should implement but only out of my own pocket. And I couldn't believe all the assemblies about fundraisers enticing the kids with cheap prizes they could win if they sold a certain amount of stuff. The teachers here have been shafted with the lottery, that was supposed to cure all of the state's educational ills. Honestly, I don't think the schools need more money. OR, at least, we don't have a true picture of how much money the CLASSROOMS need because the administration tends to be so top heavy and power hungry. The money they do have needs to be better managed and the teachers need to be allowed to make decisions, IMO. When I taught I often wondered how much money we really needed when I saw all the upgrades to superintendents' offices that were made - and there were several under-superintendents. Maybe it just needed to be reallocated. And since it is all so centralized, I really had nothing in common with the students in Fresno but we all had to follow the same programs. And I still had to get donations of kleenex, hand soap, band-aids, etc. or I paid for them myself. And, at least when I taught, teacher supplies did not qualify as a business expense, so I had to pay an incredible amount out of pocket before I could consider a tax write off.

And the ones who really pay the price are the kids.

Can you tell I was very, very frustrated when I taught?

wild_destiny
10-24-2010, 03:21 PM
What you describe is very frustrating, Ann. I hope it is better now that you are homeschooling with your co-op. At least there, even if you have to pay a lot out of pocket for books and supplies, you get to decide how and when the money is spent and used.

My aunt (living in Texas) was a special ed teacher for a number of years, during which time the budget for her classroom was quite small. Being one of those super caring types (and the mother of a special needs child herself), she really sank a lot of her own money into supplies that she felt would really benefit her students in ways that would make a noticeable difference in their lives. But it took a lot of money, and eventually her husband begged her to quit teaching. They were just not making ends meet that well with so much of her salary going right back into her classroom. After additional training, she became a guidance counselor. She still gets to help the kids, but does not have to spend her own money on classroom supplies (although the number of students that she is expected to oversee is staggering, but that is another subject.) Frankly, the whole public school situation/funding issues/poor results/etc. is just depressing and disturbing. Glad you made it out of there in one piece. :)