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Topsy
10-05-2010, 07:28 AM
I always enjoy reading about how different homeschoolers come to their particular style or "genre" of home education. This article was a good example of that...

A Journey to Unschooling (http://dissidentvoice.org/2010/10/a-journey-to-unschooling/)

dbmamaz
10-05-2010, 10:24 AM
Isnt it funny how different articles resonate with different readers? that one left me dry, like most, but I LOOOVVVEEEED this one! http://homeedmag.com/HEM/195/sounschool.html Even tho I dont consider myself an unschooler!

hockeymom
10-05-2010, 02:43 PM
Good article, Topsy. Thanks for sharing.

Stella M
10-10-2010, 02:49 AM
Thanks for the link Topsy.

Cara, I loved the 'unschooling is my job' article. It summed up a lot of what I felt when we unschooled and eased my feelings of failure for giving up on it. It is hard, albeit rewarding, work. Or it was for me :)

Siggi
01-25-2011, 08:28 PM
Isnt it funny how different articles resonate with different readers? that one left me dry, like most, but I LOOOVVVEEEED this one! http://homeedmag.com/HEM/195/sounschool.html Even tho I dont consider myself an unschooler!

Oooh, great article, dbmamaz! It even put into place a couple of the last pieces I've needed for some of my own thinking lately. Thank you!

KristinK
01-25-2011, 09:00 PM
loved the "unschooling is my job" article too!

Kristina Breece
01-25-2011, 09:26 PM
Great articles... both of them, really. But what I really connected with was this, in "Unschooling is my Job":

"When there are things that I absolutely have to do because all other choices are unacceptable, it seems like a waste of time to ponder future difficulties. Why bother to think about how difficult it will be when I have to do it anyway? So when we examined homeschooling and decided that it would be the absolute best thing for our children, I did not spend time agonizing over its impact on our lives. Our minds were made up, and analyzing the potential complications would only have paralyzed me.

Now, however, I think that I need to face honestly the implications of this job I have taken on so that I can give myself the respect I deserve. What I usually leave out of my explanations of unschooling are the complications."

I think a LOT of women tend to that. What we do is what we must do (or what we've convinced ourselves we must do) so we kill ourselves to get "it" (whatever "it" may be at that point in time), and then we downplay how hard "it" was to do. It's how I justify not taking enough time for myself, waking up at 4 to make sure DH's coveralls are dry (or throw them in the dryer if they're not), and striving to micromanage every aspect of my family's lives. I feel like these are things that must be done, and that no one else will do them if I don't, so there's no point to thinking about it too much or I will freeze up.