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Topsy
05-04-2015, 11:08 AM
I'm not sure this necessarily belongs in the LD board, simply because I'm guessing that many kids have struggles with executive functioning tasks, but it is something that my oldest (Tourette's) really has struggled with. It took me a long time to even find a name for the issues he was having, but finally I did come across a description of "executive function" strengths and weaknesses, and I realized that a lot of his tendencies could be lumped into that area.

I bring it up because I came across an article today about games that might possibly improve EF skills. Five games that will improve your kids? executive function ? Quartz (http://qz.com/239976/five-games-that-will-improve-your-kids-executive-function/)

But I wonder if you know of any other resources that you'd recommend for helping with executive functioning skills?

fastweedpuller
05-04-2015, 11:34 AM
Smart but Scattered (http://www.amazon.com/Smart-but-Scattered-Revolutionary-Executive/dp/1593854455/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1430753268&sr=1-1&keywords=smart+but+scattered) and Smart but Scattered for Teens (http://www.amazon.com/Smart-but-Scattered-Teens-Executive/dp/1609182294/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1430753268&sr=1-2&keywords=smart+but+scattered) are great books for helping kids get organized.

Correlated with executive function issues is something called "working memory." The brain is an amazing place, really; there is quite a bit of study about wiring up those pliable young brains with simple memory tests. DD did CogMed training (http://www.cogmed.com/), for example. There are other working-memory tests (Lumosity gets lots of airtime) that are readily available, though, not just through a doctor.

I wish there were a one-stop shop for executive function help; there does not seem to be...we're just too complicated! But knowledge of how executive function works, and what part working memory plays in executive functioning, was really helpful in helping us navigate how best to help (and teach) our ADD kid.

Avalon
05-04-2015, 03:09 PM
I read Smart but Scattered for Teens last year and it was like a revelation. What I noticed was that my personal areas of strength just happen to be my daughter's areas of weakness, so they seemed to be extremely poor to me when in fact, she's probably not that far below average.

Playing games is a tricky thing around here, though. My daughter has always hated them, and I only recently realized that it's BECAUSE she has difficulty with several executive function skills. I have to force her to play games the way other people force their kids to scrub toilets.

Norm Deplume
05-04-2015, 05:25 PM
Another vote for Smart But Scattered. Changed my whole thinking on the things DS was struggling with.

Topsy
05-05-2015, 12:28 PM
Smart but Scattered (http://www.amazon.com/Smart-but-Scattered-Revolutionary-Executive/dp/1593854455/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1430753268&sr=1-1&keywords=smart+but+scattered) and Smart but Scattered for Teens (http://www.amazon.com/Smart-but-Scattered-Teens-Executive/dp/1609182294/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1430753268&sr=1-2&keywords=smart+but+scattered) are great books for helping kids get organized.

THANK you for that suggestion!!! Ordered!!

Avalon
05-05-2015, 03:18 PM
I should add that the self-evaluation quizzes in the "For Teens" book are aimed at kids in school. Many of the items had to do with getting homework done on time, having notes organized, etc... I found the questions in the book for adults much broader and more applicable to my homeschooled teenager.