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View Full Version : Custard Square / Vanilla Slice Recipe



aspiecat
04-12-2015, 08:10 PM
For those of you who don't know what either a Custard Square of Vanilla Slice is, ask a Kiwi or Aussie. Well, ask the Kiwi about the former, the Aussie about the latter. However, the responses will be basically the exact same thing: a custard-filled, puff pastry-bottomed, passionfruit icing-topped afternoon tea snack found in almost every bakery and in a few home kitchens. They are a mainstay of comfort food in the Antipodes and we ex-pats really miss them!

These are hugely popular at kids' birthdays, or really just any get-together when you're sick of bringing cakes and cookies.

https://thekitchensgarden.files.wordpress.com/2012/12/custard-square-003.jpg?w=700

CUSTARD SQUARES



1 (17.25 ounce) package frozen puff
pastry, thawed
1 cup white sugar
1/2 cup custard powder
3/4 cup cornstarch
5 1/4 cups milk
1/4 cup butter
2 egg yolks
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup confectioners' sugar
1 tablespoon milk
1 dash vanilla extract




Method:

1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Unfold puff pastry sheets, and place flat onto baking sheets, prodding with a fork all over to avoid the pastry from puffing up too much. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes, or until lightly browned and puffed. Set aside.

2. Combine the sugar, custard powder and cornstarch in a large saucepan. Mix in just enough milk to form a paste, then gradually mix in the rest. This will prevent lumps from forming. Add the butter. Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently until thick. You may need to use a whisk to ensure a smooth consistency. When the mixture comes to a simmer, cook stirring constantly for 2 minutes. Remove from the heat, and stir in the egg yolks and vanilla.

3. Line a 9inch baking dish with aluminum foil. Place one of the baked pastry sheets in the bottom of the dish. Spread the custard filling in an even layer over the pastry, and top with the other sheet. (NB: ensure the baking dish has high enough sides to cope with how much filling you will put in.)

4. Mix the confectioners' sugar with 1 tablespoon of milk, and a dash of vanilla to make an icing. Spread over the top of the pastry. Refrigerate until the custard layer is firm. Remove from the pan and slice.


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I have custard powder but most Americans haven't even heard of it, let alone been able to find it in most grocery stores. We live regionally, but I can source custard powder from a nearby Kroger store that stocks British foods.

Also, I prefer a coffee icing - not strong, more a hint of coffee. Passionfruit icing is traditional, but the vanilla icing in this recipe is there purely because it's a "safe" flavour. Use whatever flavour you think you prefer. Even lemon is a good one.

Aspie

CrazyMom
04-12-2015, 08:31 PM
OMG...Yum!

ejsmom
04-12-2015, 08:47 PM
OMG, Aspie, that looks sooooo good.

aspiecat
04-12-2015, 08:54 PM
I shall make it and take pics. Never made it before, but I think I ought to try. It's not difficult, but because it's easily found in bakeries in the UK, NZ and Australia, I have never before bothered to make it.

Starkspack
04-12-2015, 09:10 PM
Screw pie, I want THAT. :heart:

alexsmom
04-12-2015, 09:18 PM
It looks so tasty! Is there an upcoming antipodean holiday coming up that we could serve that and pavlova?

*Im thinking antipodean poetry tea day!

skrink
04-12-2015, 09:22 PM
Wow, yummy looking!! I hate food allergies.

aspiecat
04-13-2015, 07:11 PM
Well...ANZAC Day is coming up. It's April 25th.

Maybe a good day to try Antipodean dishes and culture? I am sure that the Aussies and Kiwis here can come up with fun suggestions!

Aspie

darkelf
04-13-2015, 07:33 PM
You can get custard powder from Amazon if you can't find it locally.

Our Kroger doesn't have it. I wonder if the British Pantry a few towns over does?

I bought the Custard powder for Biscuits, not a bad recipe, but I ended up "tweaking" it and liking it a lot better. I haven't tried it for actual "custard". I think I'm going to have to make this tonight. (with the vanilla icing, I"m all out of passion fruit.)

aspiecat
04-13-2015, 09:06 PM
Wow, yummy looking!! I hate food allergies.

What food allergies do you have? Maybe this recipe would be adjusted...?

aspiecat
04-13-2015, 09:08 PM
darkelf!

Let me know how it went! I am making it later this week, so we can compare results LOL.

darkelf
04-13-2015, 11:22 PM
darkelf!

Let me know how it went! I am making it later this week, so we can compare results LOL.

The custard was very "thick". A lot thicker then I'm used too. Dh cleaned the pan with a spoon. I haven't eaten any yet. But soon..........

ejsmom
04-15-2015, 07:18 PM
Hey Aspie, I saw custard powder at a local, more upscale grocery yesterday (in the British import section.) There were two different kinds and I wasn't sure what the diffrerence was, and did not have the time to check it out. Nor did I have my reading glasses to read the little print. Anyway, I did notice the first ingredient was "cornflour." Is that what Americans call "cornstarch"? It's used to thicken stuff and make puddings and gravies and such. I've generally switched away from corn products, but, I still want to try it at least once. Since I know I can get it easily I may have to go pick some up and try this recipe in the next few weeks. I've been making DS a butterscotch pudding lately and I use some fresh butter and some browned butter and it gets crazy rich. But now I'm intrigued by this.

alexsmom
04-16-2015, 01:00 AM
Special kitchen and chemistry ingredients are about to go on my hate list!

But per livestrong.com, you can substitute cornstarch in case of it being called for in a recipe.
How to Replace Custard Powder | LIVESTRONG.COM (http://www.livestrong.com/article/486405-how-to-replace-custard-powder/)

They also had other substitutions in case you prefer to avoid cornstarch ;)

And the internet abounds with recipes for homemade custard powder.

aspiecat
04-16-2015, 04:20 PM
Hey Aspie, I saw custard powder at a local, more upscale grocery yesterday (in the British import section.) There were two different kinds and I wasn't sure what the diffrerence was, and did not have the time to check it out. Nor did I have my reading glasses to read the little print. Anyway, I did notice the first ingredient was "cornflour." Is that what Americans call "cornstarch"? It's used to thicken stuff and make puddings and gravies and such. I've generally switched away from corn products, but, I still want to try it at least once. Since I know I can get it easily I may have to go pick some up and try this recipe in the next few weeks. I've been making DS a butterscotch pudding lately and I use some fresh butter and some browned butter and it gets crazy rich. But now I'm intrigued by this.

Yes, what I call 'cornflour' is what you call 'cornstarch'. Exact same. As for the different kinds of custard powder, not sure what the different kinds would be as custard powder is generally one kind of thing. That is unless one had a different flavouring (it's usually very light vanilla).

aspiecat
04-16-2015, 04:22 PM
Custard can also be made from scratch, and this recipe happens to be part custard powder, part 'real' custard.

aspiecat
04-16-2015, 04:39 PM
I made them yesterday early afternoon - a batch of 12. Needless to say there are two "squares" left...

3055

darkelf
04-16-2015, 04:57 PM
I will say while Custard Powder (well Bryds anyway) has corn starch/corn flour in it, it isn't a 100% corn starch. There are other ingredients. And it has a tint to it as well. It makes the custard yellowish and with the eggs, very yellow. It does gave a light vanilla taste.

My family loved the custard pie. I will be making it again.

aspiecat
04-16-2015, 07:13 PM
Glad to hear that, Marta!