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aspiecat
03-21-2015, 11:49 AM
I haven't really got anything specific about which to talk, but perhaps we could use this thread for any general issues we might have with our kiddos who have an ASD. This would include Asperger Syndrome as the APA is not the be-all and end-all of diagnostic criteria LOL.

Aspie

Mariam
03-21-2015, 09:53 PM
Sounds good to me.

jbuescher
03-22-2015, 10:13 PM
Hello! I'm so happy to have found this page! My 5 year old DD has ASD. She will receive her official diagnosis in a few weeks and we will enroll her in an ABA school for a year. Then I hope to homeschool her. Our neurologist said to keep her in a small school with children similar to her. Beyond the ABA school…I have no idea what to do. How can I find special needs homeschool groups/meet-ups/co-ops in my area? We are in Indianapolis and will be moving to the N/NW suburbs this summer.
Thanks,
Jessica

Reddog2
03-23-2015, 03:56 PM
Hi Jessica,
Wondering how West you will be? I am in NE Indiana, but we travel about 45 minutes West to South Bend to the Logan Center. They don't have homeschool groups, but they do have classes and socializing opportunities for kids with ASD. Most are after school or on Saturdays.
Lisa

Mariam
03-26-2015, 12:43 AM
Well I have something to share. DS, who is 7, has been wanting to learn karate. Now he isn't good in structured class settings, but he really wanted to do this. Well, we are home early, with a child in tears because his anxiety was so bad that he was afraid to participate and mad at himself for it ending this way. It was loud, which we didn't anticipate as much as we should have and some of the kids had participated in the past, so they had an idea of what to expect which increased DS' anxiety even more.

We are thinking of private lessons since he wants it so badly. It breaks my heart to see him in this state.

HawaiiGeek
03-26-2015, 02:49 AM
That is so frustrating. The Dojo my daughter goes to is very quiet. The sensei is Japanese and so soft-spoken. Maybe there is another Dojo? I am thinking no given your location, but I could be wrong. Privates is always an option, but for my eclectic DD the whole function of the dojo with the sense of order and rules has been really good for her concentration. My DS with ASD refuses to do most of those kind of activities due his low muscle tone and he gets really frustrated, so I totally understand because you just wish you could make it easier for them.

Mariam
03-26-2015, 03:22 AM
There are not a lot of Dojos where we live. And I am concerned about the attitude of some of the teachers (looking to build badass kids instead of training for the order, rules, and respect for the practice).

The teacher at this one class was really nice and patient with the kids, but the kids were still loud. I think we may try for private lessons, until he feels more comfortable. We are also working on some exercises to help calm his anxiety. Hopefully we can try again soon.

atomicgirl
03-26-2015, 11:36 AM
Mariam--I'm sorry. It is heartbreaking to watch the anxiety take away the dream. My daughter (12) did kung fu for years. She was very good, and even competed in tournaments where she took first a couple of times. As the school grew, though, the stress (noise, chaos, new frustrations) became too much and now I can't get her on the deck for anything. My son and I still take classes a few times a week, but we originally started to support her. I have no advice other than to go with the private lessons.

aspiecat
03-26-2015, 12:33 PM
My own DS tried kung-fu when he was six years old, and did it for a year before he decided the growing noise in the classes - this was a new "school" so there were only a handful of students in each class for a while - was getting too much. Plus, he didn't figure that he'd actually have to touch other people and be touched - which, in sparring, you do have to endure LOL.

Unfortunately, there will always be sharp shouting in any martial arts. It's about giving attention to only that which is necessary, so there are only staccato commands yelled out to the students. An option is for him to wear those squishy earplugs to drown out the sharpest of noise, if he is able to cope with them in his ears.

Is there another sport or activity in which he is interested? Something on which he is equally keen, and he can not worry about noise and other sensory issues?

Mariam
03-26-2015, 01:33 PM
Thanks for all of your kind thoughts.

Oh he is interested in a ton of sports. He is working on basketball and soccer, but he has had trouble with the team aspect of it. :eek:

We previously had him enrolled in private swimming lessons and I think we will go back to that. I plan on going to private karate, if I can find a teacher/dojo whose philosophy I can work with and who will be willing to work with DS.

He wants to join Boy Scouts, which I cannot stomach and I think his head would explode when they mention god. We have had discussions about religion, and specifically god and I can see the look on peoples faces when he asks them which god and tells them we have a statue of buddha and vishnu in the house. :) I am looking at trying to get something together that is an alternative to boy scouts.

He wants to get out and meet more kids. He has a small group that he plays with, but I know he has other needs to be very social. (I know, he wants to be social, but then he doesn't.)

He does great with free play. When we go to the park and there is a bunch of kids he does great, most of the time. It is the structure and expectations of a specific outcome that presents problems.

atomicgirl
03-26-2015, 03:06 PM
I am looking at trying to get something together that is an alternative to boy scouts.
Let me know if you figure something out. I've looked around haphazardly for the last year or so for my son. He's not really a boy scout kind of kid, but thinks he wants to be. For example, he really hates going outside.

My daughter (ASD) was in girl scout for years. I helped found a troop with a friend that would be comfortable for both of our daughters with special needs. In the end the friend's need to be popular (I kid you not) set the tone, and within 3 years our 6 member troop went to almost 30 girls packed into her living room. My daughter and I both had to quit and the friendship didn't survive it. We've had the best luck with small, unstructured playgroups made up of quirky kids obsessed with the same books/movies/tv shows.

HawaiiGeek
03-26-2015, 03:46 PM
I dislike the start of boy scouts overall with the pledge etc which I boycott, but in our experience many of the boys in boy scouts are on the spectrum and it has been a good overall experience. My husband usually takes him and he is more tolerant of that stuff than me, plus he was an eagle scout. DS (12 with ASD) is very blunt and has said he doesn't believe in God before in the group and they just take it with a grain of salt. Now that being said Hawaii is not very religious and seems more tolerant for that, when we are away from the military side. ( the military is very religious ugh) we purposely do not do a military troop. My husband is Active Duty Air Force and being liberal we are definitely in the minority, but I have learned to keep my mouth shut (it is hard!).

laundrycrisis
03-26-2015, 07:08 PM
I would be really careful with the dojo. If you find one that is a better fit but a longer drive, it might be worth serious consideration.

There are some dojos that even have a focus on helping kids with ADD, sensory issues, social anxiety, etc. Some even have separate classes to help the kids get confident before they join a larger class.

I hope you find something that will work. All kids should have a chance to feel like they can be successful.


There are not a lot of Dojos where we live. And I am concerned about the attitude of some of the teachers (looking to build badass kids instead of training for the order, rules, and respect for the practice).

The teacher at this one class was really nice and patient with the kids, but the kids were still loud. I think we may try for private lessons, until he feels more comfortable. We are also working on some exercises to help calm his anxiety. Hopefully we can try again soon.

Mariam
03-26-2015, 07:56 PM
I completely agree laundrycrisis - the dojo matters. I didn't know that some had classes for kids with different needs. That give me hope. We have town about 30 miles away that might be more likely to have this.

skrink
03-26-2015, 08:21 PM
I have thought about trying martial arts with dd. She has mentioned interest from time to time, but frankly, with her aggression issues it makes me wary. Anyone have kids with similar problems who tried martial arts? I'd be curious to hear about it.

atomicgirl
03-27-2015, 01:58 AM
I have thought about trying martial arts with dd. She has mentioned interest from time to time, but frankly, with her aggression issues it makes me wary. Anyone have kids with similar problems who tried martial arts? I'd be curious to hear about it.

From my experience, the kids with aggression issues are easier to handle than the ones who who are just clueless about how their actions affect others. Martial arts is all about channeling aggression and developing personal discipline with skills meant to cause damage. A good instructor can really help with that. We have a couple of kids at our school who have that issue, but all of the instructors are aware and we take extra care during one-on-one drills and anything else that involves contact. More supervision. More instruction and guidance.

One of the adults with whom I spar occasionally, however, has no real sense of himself. He does not realize how strong he is, how hard he is hitting, and how much power he needs to accomplish a skill. He's very nice and I'd consider him a friend. I don't believe he'd hurt me on purpose, but he's also the only one who's done more than superficial damage to me.

If you are really concerned, but want to give it a try look into Wushu or another "soft" style. You can still cause injury, but the emphasis is different.

violetk
04-01-2015, 11:56 PM
Hi. What do you do when socialization really is an issue? I recently had my ds (11) evaluated for Aspergers. I have always known that he is on the spectrum, but decided to get something official because I was looking at a school for him. I know about the opportunities for homeschooled kids to get out and socialize with people, but we never get to take advantage of those things.
My ds has no friends. He did not want to stay in touch with his classmates when I pulled him out of school 2 years ago. The neighborhood kids he used to play with faded away as they all got older and the social gap between him and everyone else widened. The classes he used to take (art, ceramics) no longer interest him. He only cares about Minecraft and other computer games.
Ds also gets very carsick and he gets headaches and migraines. Sometimes that is due to the carsickness, but mostly it is triggered by other things. Just getting him out of the house is a nightmare. Even when we are going to do something fun, we often have to cut it short because he feels like crap or is in pain.
The school I was looking at specializes in kids on the spectrum. He would get to be around kids who are wired like him and teachers who understand how he works. I know that sending him to school won't fix everything. We are going to be starting speech therapy, social skills groups, and occupational therapy for his various issues. I wonder if that will be enough to help jump start him and get him a life outside this house. While the school does provide some therapy, I wasn't terribly impressed with the academic side and would like to continue homeschooling. I enjoy the freedom it allows us. I am just worried that I am making this about me and not putting his best interests first.
Sorry this is so long. Any ideas? Anyone who saw an improvement with therapy?

justabout
04-02-2015, 01:41 AM
I personally make it an absolute condition of homeschooling that the kids HAVE to do outside activities (I have three kids on the spectrum). It does help having three, because generally you can assume that one of the three will cope, a different one on a different day...
I make absolutely no allowance for the fact that they are not interested. They have to try new things, otherwise they go back to school. It helps that my kids are desperate to HE, this approach would not work for anyone: but they are bright kids, they can see that an hour once a week doing a class they don't really care about much is a better deal than school six hours every day. I don't know if that helps...

But I don't think you are making this all about you at all, violetk, it sounds like you are in a very tough position and you are trying to work out what will help him grow.

violetk
04-02-2015, 02:44 AM
I hear what you are saying. That was one of the conditions I had as well. I did make him attend a class once a week (art) and for a while it was fine. However, he aged out of the class. I tried again with something new (beginner's app design ) and the first class went well. However, he changed his mind about what he wanted to do and had trouble starting over. His concern about finding the perfect design idea took over and he was in tears when I came to pick him up. His anxiety issues need to be worked on before I can expect him tackle new things. He takes a while to warm up to stuff and adjust, which won't work if we are on someone else's timetable.
Thanks for your support!



I personally make it an absolute condition of homeschooling that the kids HAVE to do outside activities (I have three kids on the spectrum). It does help having three, because generally you can assume that one of the three will cope, a different one on a different day...
I make absolutely no allowance for the fact that they are not interested. They have to try new things, otherwise they go back to school. It helps that my kids are desperate to HE, this approach would not work for anyone: but they are bright kids, they can see that an hour once a week doing a class they don't really care about much is a better deal than school six hours every day. I don't know if that helps...

But I don't think you are making this all about you at all, violetk, it sounds like you are in a very tough position and you are trying to work out what will help him grow.

skrink
04-02-2015, 08:54 AM
It's not for everyone, and people have strong feelings about it on both sides, but medication changed dd's life. It was that dramatic. Her anxieties manifest as aggression - BIG aggression, both verbal and physical - so social for us was very much curtailed for a long time, and our home life was unimaginably stressful. We tried years of diet, environmental, and behavioral interventions, but it wasn't until her (very low intervention type) dr suggested a low dose SSRI that life starting changing for the better. She isn't by any means "cured" but she can do classes and things like 4-H and be successful. She has friends. She has even been doing activities that she has been afraid of in the past, like swim lessons, and handling them well. Anyway, something to think about for your son. It might be a tool he needs for a little while.

ejsmom
04-02-2015, 09:29 AM
My child no longer meets the criteria for a diagnoses, but that doesn't mean there are not a few residual issues. That being said, we recently took away Minecraft. Best move ever. He's now socializing so much more at his other outside activities. Because he has to talk about stuff other than MC, and he has to find ways to occupy his time. We are walking more, setting up more time to hang out with other homeschoolers, going to museums and stuff more, hiking, and so on. His mind is more stimulated, but in a calmer way. I also think he is learning more, and I was telling myself that MC was educational. Maybe, but not as much as the real world has been for DS.

My DS also had severe motion sickness and migraines that limited many things. When we addressed developmental vision issues that all disappeared, completely. Many, many kids on the spectrum or with ADHD have developmental vision issues. A regular eye doctor will not be able to test for this. Vision therapy can be life changing. It made a huge difference for us. DS says he never would be able to do all he does if we had not addressed that issue.

aspiecat
04-02-2015, 11:00 AM
I wish I could take DS's video gaming away at times. He hides in his room for up to 23 hours a day, coming down for breakfast and dinner. However, if I take it away, he literally has nothing else. There are no community activities in this area, no swimming pool (he's a top swimmer), no arts and cultural things; all activities are run by the churches and are exclusive. Even the YMCA has prayers, which are compulsory...besides, the cost is prohibitive. Also, no homeschoolers here. One other family, with whom we tried to connect, but the girl met the only homeschooling family in another community west of here and they're dating now LOL. Nearest coops are all exclusive religious and SOFs must be signed.

So in his room, in his comfort zone and happy enough. *sigh*

I guess if he WAS into meeting other kids, it'd be worse, as there wouldn't be any way to meet them.

skrink
04-02-2015, 11:25 AM
I personally have had longstanding issues with anxiety so I very much sympathize. Meditation, yoga and breathing exercises help some, especially if you make them routine. Basic things like getting enough sleep and eating well are essential. Some rx intervention helps in very difficult times.

With dd we did a long unit study on the brain and talked a lot about autism & prefrontal cortex development, emotion and the limbic system, brain plasticity... It helped her understanding of what's going on inside her, and also gave hope. There are some cool videos out there on YouTube that show new neural pathways being developed. It's fascinating stuff.

cailet
04-09-2015, 01:21 PM
We are in a similar boat of not many activities in our area. It is a small town. My son tried a church group for boys but that didn't work out. There are no homeschool groups in our area and all activities are either religious based or school based. He didn't do well in public school at all and that was in a 5/6 grade class. His interest right now is minecraft or reading comic books. I am finding it hard to find any outside activities for him. Only thing at the moment is 4H but that is haphazardly run so is not very effective. He does have a plan for his market pig so that's good. He sees the reward of it as after few years he will have enough money to buy himself a decent used pickup. lol. But this mom is frustrated at lack of available activities. There is martial arts and other stuff but all over 1.5 hours away. =

darkelf
04-10-2015, 04:43 AM
Some kids are loners.
My 2 oldest boys are loners at heart.
#2 has notebook after notebook filled with scribbles and such from video games he designs, worlds he designs, ect...... He loves to sit on the couch with his headphones on and either play video games, watch movies or write in his notebooks. He is near us but not necessarily interacting with us. He prefers to be alone.

Our oldest is a bit of a loner too. He though has found a great group of friends. He is a long distance runner and so are his friends. He is fine with being by himself (if you can be by yourself in a large family.) but has learned to interact with his peers.

Unless you are an introvert, you may not know how much alone time is wanted and needed. If your child is happy, let him be. If he wants more, then help him find more.

justabout
04-10-2015, 06:15 AM
After my marriage ended last year (dreadful domestic violence-type scenario) all my boys have ended up on SSRIs. They are on a low dose but it was the difference between being able to function as a family and just falling apart. It doesn't fix the anxiety but it makes them more able to reason and talk about it, it is less overwhelming. Am going to try weaning the eldest in a couple of months. He needs to be calmer about maths first.

aspiecat
04-14-2015, 09:33 PM
The finding of appropriate activities for kids on the Autism Spectrum is not always easy, even if one lives in the hub of a major metropolitan area. DS has totally aged out of being made to start anything, and the only thing he's interested in even trying is college (he finishes high school this semester). And that is a bone of contention as he wants to do his higher education online; his father, SF and I are all against this, as we can imagine he will end up working from home.

God, we'll never be rid of him.

Seriously, it's a worry when they start to feel ill at even the thought of their comfort zone being stretched. I have totally stopped any "peer socialisation" as, at nearly 16, he is too young to be forced to make friends, especially since we have to drive about three hours to even find any secular homeschoolers. Besides, he HATES being in the car for longer than half an hour, always has hated it. The most I guess I can hope for is him starting community college in September and getting used to being around other, unknown, people again, perhaps even enjoying the experience.

*sigh*

Am I the only one who regularly questions her parenting decisions? I bloody well hope not...

Aspie

darkelf
04-14-2015, 09:42 PM
I have a couple that I feel will only move out if I put a trailer in the yard........

Our community college offers other classes. (Not for college credit, but for fun) Like cooking, art, music, home crafts maybe one of those could spark an interest and lead to meeting more people.

aspiecat
04-14-2015, 09:57 PM
I wish the two community colleges within a 30-min drive of us offered such courses. But noooo...you have to be doing an actual program before you can do ANYthing at all. No "one-off" classes offered at all.

I am guessing that's because it's not what Jesus would do...?

*rolls eyes*

skrink
04-14-2015, 10:44 PM
Am I the only one who regularly questions her parenting decisions? I bloody well hope not...

Aspie

Oh, no, you're definitely not alone. Nope. We have had a string of hellish days and I am left wondering what in the world I'm doing.

skrink
04-14-2015, 10:46 PM
Our community college offers other classes. (Not for college credit, but for fun) Like cooking, art, music, home crafts maybe one of those could spark an interest and lead to meeting more people.

There are classes like this offered to the community through the vo-tech at a big local high school. Is that an option, Aspie?

Mariam
04-15-2015, 12:15 AM
Am I the only one who regularly questions her parenting decisions? I bloody well hope not...

Aspie

I do. All. the. time.

HawaiiGeek
04-15-2015, 10:48 PM
Aspie, I think we are all here because we regularly question our parenting decisions. The validation from all these kindred spirits has meant the world to me. Hang in there, it is always one day at a time and keep your fingers crossed.

aspiecat
04-16-2015, 06:41 PM
There are classes like this offered to the community through the vo-tech at a big local high school. Is that an option, Aspie?

Nope. They don't actually have any vocational programs at the local high school any more. Kids who are failing academically and are not on a winning sports team (there are only two sports teams: basketball and football, and only football does any good are "encouraged" to leave and find a job as they cannot succeed in any form of academia.

But the school IS in a new, shiny campus. Surely that's a good thing...

Mslksdh
04-20-2015, 06:32 PM
Looks like I logged back on to SHS just in time! So glad this thread was started. I caught up and am happy not to feel alone. We just found out that our oldest is spectrum. Which may indeed be why he is not reading at "the proper level" of his peers. I didn't even know it was possible to have more than one children on the spectrum. So now we have to figure out how to give the introverted ASD/SPD child, calm, quiet and focused activities while giving the extroverted ASD/SPD the opposite.

I get tired of the looks when we are out and about and one of them has a meltdown.

aspiecat
05-11-2015, 11:55 AM
The thing is when we have kids dx'd as being on the Autism Spectrum, we get these people creeping out of the woodwork (read: family and close friends) saying things like, "Oh, I had a feeling about that. S/he is rather noisy/quiet/too friendly/not friendly enough/is behind/knows too much/too attached to you/too detached from you...blah blah..."

People assumed - still do - that DS is behind in his reading because he doesn't like reading. Oh, he'll read for information-gathering, and only enough to "cover the necessities", as he'll put it...but he never reads for pure pleasure. However, he was reading from age 3.5 and had an adult reading level by the age of 11, comprehension level included. It's not as if his reading level has EVER been 'behind' - he's just not a prolific reader. Only novels he will read are in graphic novel form, and he's going through a few of the classics that way in preparation for college next semester. It makes me a wee bit sad as I am a prolific reader, but hey, he's his own person LOL.

violetk
05-14-2015, 02:30 AM
Does anyone have suggestions for improving writing skills for an ASD 11 year old? Just getting him to write a paragraph is like pulling teeth. He listens intently while I explain and show him examples, but then draws a blank when it is his turn. Worrying about this actually keeps me up at night. I am terrified that I will not be able to get him where he needs to be by the time he reaches high school. We weren't able to get into a local school for kids on the spectrum, so I plan to continue hs'ing. I am trying to get him to a place where he could transition back into a classroom with ease and not be way behind everyone else.

aspiecat
05-14-2015, 09:43 AM
Does anyone have suggestions for improving writing skills for an ASD 11 year old? Just getting him to write a paragraph is like pulling teeth. He listens intently while I explain and show him examples, but then draws a blank when it is his turn. Worrying about this actually keeps me up at night. I am terrified that I will not be able to get him where he needs to be by the time he reaches high school. We weren't able to get into a local school for kids on the spectrum, so I plan to continue hs'ing. I am trying to get him to a place where he could transition back into a classroom with ease and not be way behind everyone else.

violetk - I feel your pain. DS, at 16 and finishing up high school this month, has one big weakness in his schoolwork - writing. He wants to get the facts down and embellishing is not something that comes easily to him. I am getting a tutor for him for over the summer, a local woman who is a retired college lecturer and high school teacher. One of her areas of expertise happens to be special needs, and she has come across ASD kids who struggle with the writing process a lot over the years, she says. Fingers crossed this will work.

I found her through Find a Private Tutor | WyzAnt Tutoring (http://www.wyzant.com/), where you can contact tutors in your area. I am so surprised I managed to find someone within a hour's drive, never mind in the same county. You may well find someone through this site.

It's a strange thing, this writing issue. There are so many different and creative ways to show in-depth understanding of a topic, and essay-writing is just one of them. Sure, kids need to have good writing skills to get by, but if schools, colleges and really just the education system as a whole realised that understanding can be shown in a variety of ways, kids would have higher levels of confidence.

Aspie

violetk
05-15-2015, 01:09 AM
It's a strange thing, this writing issue. There are so many different and creative ways to show in-depth understanding of a topic, and essay-writing is just one of them. Sure, kids need to have good writing skills to get by, but if schools, colleges and really just the education system as a whole realised that understanding can be shown in a variety of ways, kids would have higher levels of confidence.

I agree. I know it is a necessary skill, but I hate that he is not allowed to shine in other ways. The tutor is a good idea. It might be a better option bc he tends to try a little harder for anyone but me.:)

atomicgirl
05-16-2015, 02:30 AM
Does anyone have suggestions for improving writing skills for an ASD 11 year old? Just getting him to write a paragraph is like pulling teeth. He listens intently while I explain and show him examples, but then draws a blank when it is his turn. Worrying about this actually keeps me up at night. I am terrified that I will not be able to get him where he needs to be by the time he reaches high school. We weren't able to get into a local school for kids on the spectrum, so I plan to continue hs'ing. I am trying to get him to a place where he could transition back into a classroom with ease and not be way behind everyone else.

Where is he having problems? Is it organizing thoughts or organizing output? Is it transitions and stylistic issues? I'm a big fan of breaking skills into smaller pieces and working on each separately. There's a lot of different tasks involved into creating an essay that communicates information and ideas--too many for kids with executive function challenges to master all at once. My DD is 12 (finishing 7th grade) and does a pretty descent 5 paragraph essay after 3 years of graphic organizers, transitions practice, quote insertion exercises, summarizing sheets, etc. We're working on effective research now, which is equally as hard.

violetk
05-20-2015, 03:56 AM
Where is he having problems? Is it organizing thoughts or organizing output? Is it transitions and stylistic issues? I'm a big fan of breaking skills into smaller pieces and working on each separately. There's a lot of different tasks involved into creating an essay that communicates information and ideas--too many for kids with executive function challenges to master all at once. My DD is 12 (finishing 7th grade) and does a pretty descent 5 paragraph essay after 3 years of graphic organizers, transitions practice, quote insertion exercises, summarizing sheets, etc. We're working on effective research now, which is equally as hard.
As he puts it, he doesn't know what to say. If he does come up with something, it is usually a sentence or two because he feels that his point was made and there is no need to expand on it. I have to ask leading questions and drag more details/ideas out of him.

atomicgirl
05-20-2015, 01:02 PM
As he puts it, he doesn't know what to say. If he does come up with something, it is usually a sentence or two because he feels that his point was made and there is no need to expand on it. I have to ask leading questions and drag more details/ideas out of him.

I'd start with a good graphic organizer then. There's a ton out there, but you can make your own easily. I generally create my own to reflect the assignment and the skills we need to work on.

The first paragraph my daughter learned to write was summarizing/discussing chapters in a book she was reading. The school she was attending had a fairly complicated system that we both found unnecessarily confusing, so I changed it for us. We'd read a chapter together and pick out an "assignment" (summarizing, predicting what will happen next, character motivation, a moral or lesson, a theme--whatever), then write a Main Idea sentence using that "assignment". Then my daughter would pick out 3 supporting ideas and add those to the chart. Learning to find those took practice. Once that's done (and often that's all we would do for a chapter or several in a row) the paragraph writes itself with the exception of transitional phrases.

Transitional phrases were hard for her, so that was our second big lesson. Once she'd mastered the organization outlined above I would have her write each sentence on an index card. I had a big stack of transitional words and phrases on a set of differently colored index cards (First, Secondly, Then, However, Due to, In the event, Next, etc,.--I have a big list somewhere), and we'd put them all out on the table and arrange the paragraph with different transitions inserted until she was happy with the outcome.

After that, there was the supporting quote. Finding an appropriate quote and seamlessly adding to the paragraph involved more index cards, some post-it notes, and a lot of discussion and practice.

Only after all of this made sense did we discuss and add the concluding sentence.

To be honest, this took most of a year, and took up a lot of our literature, writing, and grammar work. However, now she writes a really nice paragraph, and does a fairly solid 5 paragraph essay. She also learned a fair amount about how literature is put together in the process. Some kids can look at an example of a paragraph and duplicate the intent. Most kids, and I think nearly all the kids on the spectrum I've met--no matter how smart, need to be given a process in little pieces before it makes sense.

HTH

HawaiiGeek
05-21-2015, 03:40 PM
Winning with writing is decent with helping with the scaffolding and lays it out well. It is also inexpensive. We found that starting writing about his obsessions also helped as he knew a lot more about them and had a lot more to say. I also scribed for him a lot, so he didn't have to add his fine motor issues into the mix.

Melissa Sinclair
10-21-2015, 05:24 PM
Hi... I'm new to all of this and my son is actually still in the public school, but we will be pulling him out as it's just not working. Biggest issue is his language processing. He "reads", but he memorizes chunks to digest, I think. So, small chunks are visual images in his head that he then analyzes for meaning. THis is fine for small chunks, but not good for long conversations, lectures, reading novels. In school, they try to use normal methods of teaching and he is refusing to participate because he simply cannot. He learns by watching and listening - and sometimes repeatedly. How do I approach homeschooling in that very, VERY visual way?

He spells perfectly as that is a picture in his head. He knows grammar rules perfectly. It's taking a chunk of language and being able to grasp the point of the words that he doesn't understand. He wouldn't be able to retell a story in his own words either. Suggestions of where to even start looking for curricula that would match his learning style?