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prochoiceparrot
07-26-2014, 11:06 AM
How can someone set it up so that the child can skip grades during homeschooling? Is this established by testing?

Thanks.

ScienceGeek
07-26-2014, 11:28 AM
My kids rarely know what 'grade' they're in. I think it only really matters if you're homeschooling thru a charter school because they have to put them in a grade. I went to a seminar on homeschooling high school and Wes Beach said that if they're ready to go on to college, or just done with high school, then go ahead and write them a transcript - its your school your rules. In California EVERY kid has to pass some test before they graduate but they start giving it to them in 10th or 11th grade so they have multiple chances to pass, then there's another test that if passed is the equivalent of saying they have graduated. I can't remember the names. But since you can choose what they're studying it doesn't really matter what grade you call it. Even in the charter school where they have to check off 'standards', they were checking 10th grade history standards for my then 7th grader because we were do history that matched up to the 10th not the 7th grade subjects. I tend to ignore the standards and teach what we want to learn.

hockeymom
07-26-2014, 11:33 AM
Skipping grades in what way and for what purpose?

Homeschooling is all about working at a child's individual ability. Few of us care much about what "grade level" our kids are working at, other than as a curiosity or if they need to undergo testing. Many of our kids have no idea how to even respond when asked by strangers what grade they are in.

How old is your child, and what is your objective?

prochoiceparrot
07-26-2014, 11:34 AM
My kids rarely know what 'grade' they're in. I think it only really matters if you're homeschooling thru a charter school because they have to put them in a grade. I went to a seminar on homeschooling high school and Wes Beach said that if they're ready to go on to college, or just done with high school, then go ahead and write them a transcript - its your school your rules. In California EVERY kid has to pass some test before they graduate but they start giving it to them in 10th or 11th grade so they have multiple chances to pass, then there's another test that if passed is the equivalent of saying they have graduated. I can't remember the names. But since you can choose what they're studying it doesn't really matter what grade you call it. Even in the charter school where they have to check off 'standards', they were checking 10th grade history standards for my then 7th grader because we were do history that matched up to the 10th not the 7th grade subjects. I tend to ignore the standards and teach what we want to learn.

Thank you. :)

prochoiceparrot
07-26-2014, 11:39 AM
Skipping grades in what way and for what purpose?



The only reason I ask is because I was wondering if someone were to homeschool their child, who surpassed standards for their chronological age, if the child would have issues getting into college when ready, versus at 18. It sounds like this is accessed by testing though?

prochoiceparrot
07-26-2014, 11:56 AM
So on the Letter of Intent, do I write the chronological grade or the actual level?

bcnlvr
07-26-2014, 12:30 PM
My eldest skipped two grades. I tested him on the level where he was (ie as a 4th grader I gave him the 6th grade ITBS/CoGAT). This was sufficient for my state (SC). So that when I put him back in school, he went right into where HE belonged academically. He is 12 going into 8th (which at this school is: English I, Spanish I, Latin III, Geometry, PE, Honors Earth Science, Art, elective....4 high school credits).

I would see what your state requires for documentation of such things.

prochoiceparrot
07-26-2014, 12:38 PM
My eldest skipped two grades. I tested him on the level where he was (ie as a 4th grader I gave him the 6th grade ITBS/CoGAT). This was sufficient for my state (SC). So that when I put him back in school, he went right into where HE belonged academically. He is 12 going into 8th (which at this school is: English I, Spanish I, Latin III, Geometry, PE, Honors Earth Science, Art, elective....4 high school credits).

I would see what your state requires for documentation of such things.
EDIT: Going to put a call into the school district's office on Monday.
Thanks. :)

dragonfly
07-26-2014, 01:03 PM
It looks like in NY, you need to include both the child's age and grade level in the LOI. If it were me, I would write in the grade level that reflects the level of the majority of the homeschool course planned.

I'd recommend looking for some local groups' websites, message boards, or email lists and see what homeschoolers in your state advise. The public school is not always the best source of accurate information regarding homeschool laws, in my experience.

Even public schooled students sometimes graduate early, so it's not something unfamiliar to colleges. As long as you keep a transcript, do the testing required for college entrance, etc. (which varies from school to school), and the child is ready for the college experience, age of completion of high school should not be much of an issue.

farrarwilliams
07-26-2014, 02:15 PM
I would personally always write the chronological grade. End of story. For the vast majority of things, there are age cut offs and kids should be with age mates - sports, art class, drama class, Sunday school, scouts, 4-H, Destination Imagination, TIP, etc. etc. You want your kid to go by age. And most of them require that.

Skipping a grade places undue focus on the grade level, IMO. I feel like I see people with younger kids considering this most often and I think it's a mistake usually. Just because a 6 yo reads at a middle school level and is working on a 4th grade math text does not mean that the same child will be ready for high school at age 11. Most kids hit a slow down at some point. They may continue to do "advanced" work, but even the most gifted kids tend to fluctuate in terms of level. You do not want to be in the position of bumping a kid's grade down or leaving them in a grade for two years as if they've failed it. Don't set yourself up for that.

If a child is really ready for college early, then having a transcript prepared that shows that and that reflects the work they've been doing that is really advanced will let them skip then. Colleges already need to examine homeschoolers by their test scores and as individuals in that sense. And if you really have a child ready for proper college admittance at a young age (not just community college since many, many homeschooled teens take cc classes as young as 12 or 13 yo), then you'll be doing lots of research into which school is right and having to choose based on entrance requirements and so forth anyway.

aspiecat
07-26-2014, 10:31 PM
It can be difficult stating what grade your child is in when deciding to homeschool, and having to inform "those who must know". It's tempting to think "Well, I think my child will be able to handle one grade-level higher than s/he was at school, so I'll put that down." As others have suggested, simply state your child's current or chronological grade, and do whatever suits once your're homeschooling proper. My DS tells everyone he's started his Sophomore year, as it's just easier, especially where we live, where homeschooling is not a done thing. He's actually doing a mix of Sophomore-, Junior- and Senior-level work, and plans to start community college January next year.

It'a all about having a goal - however big or small that might be - and finding the best way for you child to reach it. Whether the goal is to do a unit study on the Pyramids of Giza, learn beginner's French, or complete a four-year degree before one turns 20, the thing is to look at the best way to achieve that goal and not worry too much about grade levels.

Aspie

ejsmom
07-27-2014, 12:27 AM
I have to state a grade for my kid with our local school district to be legal in my state. We state that DS is in 5th grade, because that is how many years we have homeschooled - starting with his K year at age 6 and he's now 11. However, he does high school and beyond in reading, spelling, and vocab, and he's about at grade 4.5 in math due to a vision disorder that prevented him lining up numbers into columns. None of that matters. This year he will be doing what is his 5th grade year of education - BUT... it will be HIS version of 5th grade - with a mish mash of stuff from various grade levels across subjects. Some 5th grade work in writing, the tail end of 4th grade math, high school science and history, and so on. That's the beauty of homeschooling: any grade can be customized for your kid. The school district doesn't really care what I teach, or what grade I claim, they just want a number that consistently changes every year to be legal on the paperwork they submit to the state to cover their butt.

Teri
07-27-2014, 09:43 AM
I agree with Farrar about putting down the chronological age grade that he would be in with his peers. You can do whatever you want at home. I guess. In Texas, we don't tell anyone anything. My 11 year old will be doing all high school level work this year, including Harari Worldwide, which is exclusively for high school students.

However, in Texas anyway, you can't do CC until 15. It would take some major hoop jumping. It used to be much younger and it was changed.

BarbaraH
07-27-2014, 11:35 AM
These may be far off concerns, but for some students eligibility for competitions (spelling bee, science fairs, etc.) and for the National Merit Scholarship are something to are something to consider. In these situations it typically makes sense to keep child at grade level until there is a reason that determines it is time to officially skip. That reason may be enrollment in school or in college. It is possible to do more than one grade skip at the end if the student has done enough high school work and is ready to move on.

I also think it can be really hard to tell when students are younger. Some who are really self motivated academically stay that way. Others fine something else they are focused on (sports, music, social stuff, etc.) and prefer not to skip grades. It can be tough to predict that when students are young so I think the best option is to provide them an education that is appropriate to their interests and abilities and not worry about grade level until later.

prochoiceparrot
07-27-2014, 05:01 PM
Thanks a lot everyone. :)
I love how you can customize a curriculum to suit the child!

CrazyCatWoman
07-27-2014, 06:06 PM
If you are looking to do college classes early, check with the college. In WA, we have a test, the Compass, that the student needs to pass to get into community college. We have a friend who took it last year (7th grade) and passed with flying colors. The kicker is....WA has a program called Running Start that is for Juniors and Seniors. The state will play for 2 years of community college, but only if the correct grade. Family could have paid for him on their own, except for all the medical bills for his sister.

When my husband was in graduate school in Montana, he had a 12 year old girl in one of his graduate level Chemistry classes. Her mother did sit in with her, as she was 12, but she had no problem doing the work and it was very apparent that MOM was NOT doing it for her. I doubt that the mother, who homeschooled prior to college, gave the girl any grade level before she entered college.

Colleges basically just want to know that the student can do the level of work required. SAT, Compass or such can help to prove this, if this is your goal.

Lianne13
10-20-2014, 01:27 PM
My husband and I just decided to "skip" our youngest daughter from 4th to 5th on her paperwork. Our girls are registered with a satellite umbrella school now, so there's no testing or curriculum, no oversight of any kind (loving it :)). We have moved into some unschooling now and I see the grade category as a For Office Use Only kind of thing, only really needed for paperwork purposes. We have to report their "course grades" :;): every semester using the site Homeschool Reporting Online - Automating Your Homeschool Record Keeping Needs (http://www.homeschoolreporting.com) for transcript purposes and that's it.

Back to the daughter (turning 10)....she has a late October birthday and thus when we put her in public school (at the time this was in NV) so missing the cutoff date they wouldn't budge from, she had to wait a year (although I think she wasn't ready emotionally to leave mommy yet), thus in Kinder, 1st and 2nd (she read all Harry Potter books in 2nd Grade) she was ahead and top of her class. We pulled her out to homeschool half way thru 2nd and since then she breezes through everything we do at home too. This year we decided to "skip her" (needing no ones permission or testing) on her paperwork to 5th grade just to put her back to the grade level we feel she really needs to be at (her maturity level took off after Kinder passing her older sister). She would have been on schedule to graduate HS at 18 1/2 so this re-sets her to 17 1/2. My husband and I both graduated at 17 never skipping a grade, and we don't want to make her wait that long when she is insisting that we help to sign her into the Air Force once she turns 17 (if that remains her plan by then). She has a goal, so 17 is our goal.

We also have an older daughter about to turn 12 in February who started Kinder right on time but struggled (not academically but socially and emotionally) all through till 4th grade when we finally pulled her out mid year too (this was in 2012 we pulled them both out). We feel she is right on track for her age and level of maturity (6th) so there are no plans to "skip" her for now. She has no goals so far as to what she wants to do.

So our girls who are 20 months apart in age are now one "grade" apart in "school" and set to graduate at 17. I'd say if either were to "skip" ahead in the future we would just allow for 1 grade level so it would not put them graduating HS before 16. I would also do it before they get to 9th grade so it doesn't throw a cramp in the HS transcript keeping process. We do not see the point in a kid under 16 having the freedom and maturity to complete HS, yet still need mom and dad to drive them to work or college classes. Seeing as we cannot see beyond today, we are in no rush.

crunchynerd
11-05-2014, 10:16 PM
I would personally always write the chronological grade. End of story. For the vast majority of things, there are age cut offs and kids should be with age mates - sports, art class, drama class, Sunday school, scouts, 4-H, Destination Imagination, TIP, etc. etc. You want your kid to go by age. And most of them require that.

Skipping a grade places undue focus on the grade level, IMO. I feel like I see people with younger kids considering this most often and I think it's a mistake usually. Just because a 6 yo reads at a middle school level and is working on a 4th grade math text does not mean that the same child will be ready for high school at age 11. Most kids hit a slow down at some point. They may continue to do "advanced" work, but even the most gifted kids tend to fluctuate in terms of level. You do not want to be in the position of bumping a kid's grade down or leaving them in a grade for two years as if they've failed it. Don't set yourself up for that.

If a child is really ready for college early, then having a transcript prepared that shows that and that reflects the work they've been doing that is really advanced will let them skip then. Colleges already need to examine homeschoolers by their test scores and as individuals in that sense. And if you really have a child ready for proper college admittance at a young age (not just community college since many, many homeschooled teens take cc classes as young as 12 or 13 yo), then you'll be doing lots of research into which school is right and having to choose based on entrance requirements and so forth anyway.
Good points, though I wouldn't agree that it's always best to be with one's agemates. Being with one's peers is far more important than being with other people one's age.
THere are a lot of discussions at the Gifted Homeschool Forum but also elsewhere, about early college for homeschoolers, and those are good places to find out about the process, and how they are assessed at one college or another, etc.

aspiecat
11-08-2014, 11:41 PM
Good point, CN. I guess it's about the individual child. In homeschooling our kids have a far easier time "going with the flow" when it comes to working in accordance with not only their abilities but their maturity levels. At regular schools you cannot easily do that - if at all. DS never really got along with kids his own age since starting school ate age four. He converses with anyone he finds interesting, but he seems to find most teens a bit young, and for some reason doesn't appear to have a lot in common with them. I would say that goes for many homeschooled kids...