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Misha
07-03-2014, 10:13 PM
I've been homeschooling for as long as my children have been educated. We started around age 4. My youngest is now 8, and I find myself being tempted by unschooling. We've been so lazy this summer, just swimming, going to the library, and building with Legos. I enjoy the more relaxed environment and my children are so happy just reading about what interests them.


I understand the basics, but can those who do unschool enlighten me as to what a day or week might look like at your home?

crunchymum
07-04-2014, 02:16 PM
Well I have one child who I would consider unschooled (ish). He's in high school now at taking classes online so his days look different than they did when he was under 12. (Two of my other kids have/had learning challenges and so unschooling doesn't work for them and my youngest gets lumped in with the olders).
So unschooling day/week for my oldest when he was under age 12 would look something like this:


he'd read whatever he was currently into. Mostly non-fiction. He was the kind of kid who would go deep on one subject and stay with it until he got his fill or got distracted with something else. I would supplement his learning with whatever books, audiobooks, dvds/documentaries I could.

he'd write - he was/is working on a series of fantasy stories. He's drawn maps, made history timelines and made up languages and filled all sorts of notebooks. I'm not privy to all of it but he did share some of it. When he'd get stuck he'd come and we'd chat about it and I would send him links or getting him books from the library on writing etc.

Every once in a while I would ask him if he had paid attention to his math skills. He went through Singapore, all of Zaccaro's Challenge math programs and the gr7-10 Singapore/new elementary math

Other activities of his choosing included sports (hockey, soccer, curling, fencing etc). He volunteered on his own at a local museum and a seniors centre. He has been part of a robotics team for years. And he's taken chess classes

I did insist that he participate in our family events. We have done a regular co-op for years that involves field trips, visiting scientists programs, volunteering, nature programming, art etc. (It varies by year). We also did other co-ops for shorter term programming. We'd have family movie, game and science nights throughout the month. My husband likes to build things with the kids. We'd do a larger family field trip at least one weekend a month and I would try to do another one with just the kids one Monday a month (ie trip to a museum in another town - that sort of thing).

Not sure if that helps.
Because I wasn't unschooling the others, there were a variety of activities he could opt in or out of so it was pretty easy to keep interesting things in front of him and he's the kind of kid who is highly motivated to learn which is part of why I was willing to let him head off in his own direction.

albeto
07-06-2014, 01:11 PM
I've been homeschooling for as long as my children have been educated. We started around age 4. My youngest is now 8, and I find myself being tempted by unschooling. We've been so lazy this summer, just swimming, going to the library, and building with Legos. I enjoy the more relaxed environment and my children are so happy just reading about what interests them.


I understand the basics, but can those who do unschool enlighten me as to what a day or week might look like at your home?

My kids do not do any formal schooling, and this sounds like something we would have done. Interests changed and evolved and developed over the years. Legos turned into bionicles which turned into human physiology which eventually became an interest in neurology. That's how unschooling has been working in my home. Left to their own interests, my kids find certain things more fascinating than others, and they have the time to pursue their interests. Because we have no formal schedule to maintain, their interests could be explored for 10 min or 10 hours at a time. I like that. I think that worked out pretty well for us.

In my opinion, the value of not having a set schedule (unschooling) is to offer an open canvas for experiential learning. Without the constricts of time, the child can play as long as his or her imagination is engaged. Play is very important. I think it's vital, and I think research bears this out. Play is how we learn, how we explore various potential cause and effect scenarios in a relatively safe environment. It's how children learn the social skills that will support them when they're older. Ideally, they will have cooperative social skills rather than manipulative social skills. Homeschooling, and particularly unschooling, offers the child this opportunity more so than other forms of education. I say particularly unschooling based on my own experiences, so take that for what it's worth.

When we did formal curricula, my kids went on a break to play and I did too. I needed that time to regenerate emotionally and mentally so I could be available emotionally and mentally for them when they came back. I found that when I no longer required them to sit at the table and do school work, I didn't need that break. I could interact with them on their terms, according to their needs, and because their needs weren't constant, I never felt like I needed a break. It was altogether more relaxing which meant when they truly needed me, I was already refreshed and mentally and emotionally ready.

I looked to the radical unschooler mentors, as that was the only unschooling info I could find. I didn't find them to be aversive as others do, and maybe that's because I am familiar with the style of picking apart details and analysing them (nit-picking). Any perceived lack of patience or sympathy was lost on me as well, since I was just looking for information. So I learned to be "on call" 24 hours a day, as I interpreted unschooling to mean putting the child's needs first. The needs, as I saw them, were first social, then academic. First social because cooperation and autonomy are both instinctive to us, and that creates conflict. Learning to solve conflict in an effective, socially appropriate way is, in my opinion, an enormously important skill. In fact, I think all play is really as series of learning how to solve problems in effective, socially appropriate ways. That's where unschooling comes in: it's learning through play.

Academic skills are learned along the way. In my experience, it's first learned through informal play, but as children grow and mature, their style of play does too. Cutting out shapes of the digestive system in colored paper makes way for reading physiology books. Textbooks are awesome sources of information - all of it organized and packed into one, great book. Because my husband and I appreciate a formal college education, our conversations often reflect this. I don't mean like, "When you get to college..." or "You'll need this for college..." Although those comments do occur, I mean more informally. Our general conversations around the house reflect a respect for attention to detail, identifying information, objective data, basically, fact from opinion. As my kids grow and their opinions veer away from ours, they've learned to support their opinions with fact, rather than emotional pleas, or appeal to the masses. This is second nature to them now. In short, they can spot bullshit a mile away.

So back to your question - our days looked like yours. Library, play, going to the park, swimming, etc. My job was to facilitate their learning experience, and that meant for me not only helping them resolve conflict, but also helping them identify a problem, brainstorm ideas, and watch as they explored possible solutions (to avoid getting hurt, wasting money, etc). They made good decisions, they made bad decisions, they learned from both, they gained confidence and a strong sense of self-esteem. I don't think my kids think of failing as a bad thing, but rather as a clue to solving their problem. To me, that's the goal of unschooling - giving kids the opportunity to learn the skills they'll need in life in an environment that is most naturally suited to human development. For kids, that means play.

Lianne13
08-10-2014, 10:39 AM
I am currently diving into reading John Holt and unschooling info right now too. We were loosely using Time4learning and the girls are sick of it, so we will have no set curriculum this year. I have gathered free online and offline resources for them to utilize for their interests when it strikes them. We may still arrange some set time for math learning but I would like everything else to create its own flow. Oh and I like the idea of using living books Charlotte Mason style. Baby steps.

CrazyMom
10-27-2014, 03:53 PM
The biggest misconception people have about unschooling...is that it's lazy schooling. A good unschooler works really hard to lay an educational foundation in a way that makes it an appealing choice that a student decides to take on himeself....rather than an insufferable requirement that is forced on them.

An unschooler might create a very appealing science project, or a treasure hunt, or a letter with stickers, or compile a box of mysterious items....with a list of simple written instructions. The child might observe the parent working with these materials themselves.

Wow, can I do that?

Yes, but you need to learn to read the instructions.

I don't know how to read.

Well, most people think it's a useful skill to learn.

How do I learn to read?

Let's go to the library and see what we can find on the subject. Let's go on the internet and see what we can find. In the mean time....would you like to know what I know about learning to read?

YES!

Ok, when I was a kid....they taught something called phonics. Each letter can make different sounds. You can use clues to help you figure out which sound it makes.

I know the letter sounds. And the vowel sounds. You used to read me that book, remember? I can read little words and easy words.

Right! So you've already got a good start.

All the books I try to read are too hard.

Anything is hard at first. They have a special place at the library with easy books for people just learning to read.

Can you show me?

Yes. Also, did you know if you learn to read 220 words by sight, you can read over half of everything ever written?

Really? Which words?

I'll show you how to find the list. If you get some paper, I'll read the letters and you can write down the first ten words, if you want to.


And thus....a reader is born. Someone who was ready and CHOSE the skill for themselves. If they're reluctant, you simply find ways to sweeten the pot until they crack and BEG you to teach them to read.

You can find practical applications for everything. And you can give your kids the freedom to pursue what interests them. Once they get used to the learning style....they get it. They get that they are in control, but you have a lot a of wonderful stuff to offer. They get that you give good advice and are on their side. They try stuff...willingly...because they trust your counsel. And they feel safe saying nope...this isn't for me right now. Builds a ton of confidence, self-reliance, objective reasoning......and a really strong parent/child bond. If they come to you and trust your advice about what to learn, chances are good they'll talk to you about all sorts of other things in their lives, too.

I wouldn't home school any other way.

Jen Law
10-27-2014, 07:21 PM
In UK terms I'm not really considered an unschooler (by myself or others) but I think this group may describe us as unschooling. We don't have a fixed curricula but we will use curricula type resources if they help them follow a particular interest. Now..typical day/week...thats a hard one...I guess a lot like you already are doing. MOndays are the easiest to describe because that is the day that we actually have reguular stuff.

I normally take my 5yo to a preschool gardening club at an allotment on the local city farm while my 10yo has a tennis lesson at the park next to the farm. After her lesson she comes to the farm where we have a picnic lunch with friends until it is time for my 5yo's tennis lesson. 10yo plays in the park with her friends for a while before the all head to a home ed drama class in the community hall (also next to the park). While the older kids are at drama the younger kids play in the park or, if it's wet, we drink tea and play board games in the kitchen at he community hall. Most peole hang out in the neearby skateboard park for a little while before heading home although once a month there is a ceramics workshop in a studio (also next to the farm) which we sometime go along to.

However, it's a holiday week here so all the groups we go to are off so today I did some puzzles and read comic books and did puzzles with Little bear (5yo) while Hipster (10yo) wrote a blog entry. After a while, Little bear wanted to do the puzzles alone so I went on to Khan academy (I am gong through high school maths because it has been soooo long since I have used any of it I can barely remember it so I feel like doing a bit of brain training), Hipster saw what I was up to, realised she hadn't been on for months, remembered that she actually enjoys it so sat down to do some. Little Bear joined me making lunch because he like to use the knives and after we ate he played Sim City while Hipster and I talked through her plans for NaNoWriMo. She is using the workbook this year; she didn't want to use it last year which make the editing hellish so she asked me to order one this time round. We compiled a list of books that would be helpful for her research and ordered from the library. I made dinner alone while they played with the rabbits in the garden then build and elaborate world from what seemed to be every toy in our house. I chilled with my ukulele while they cleared up then we sat down to read "My father's Dragon". They asked to watch something but it was getting late so I agreed to Doctor WHo Extra on iplayer since it is only 10 minutes long; then bath, warm milk and little more book before going off to bed. My husband got home just in time to kiss them good night; he does 3 12 hour shifts a week which means those days he is gone all day but he is home for 4 full days a week.

Sometimes we have larger projects going on but we don't have any at the moment. Hipster is planning an Egyptian "unit study" (inspired by "Are you my Mummy?") for her and her friends to do after Nanowrimo. They are going to mummify a chicken, she's booked a workshop at the local museum and used her pocket money to buy an Egyptian themed Murder Mystery party kit.

I'm fairly familiar with both the Scottish and the Finnish core curricula so mentally check of the learning outcomes that I think have been covered recent activities and (so far) I haven't felt that there ware and gaps in her knowledge or abilities that I have had to make her work on; we generally cover everything plus some more in our everyday being.

CrazyMom
11-06-2014, 01:21 PM
I think the thing about Unschooling that bothers people, is that it sort of flies in the face of what people have been taught about education. Even though they've never tried it....they find the idea appalling. LOL. It's just too different from what they've been taught is the *right* way to educate. (it's almost exactly like people who are horrified by home schooling who believe that traditional school is the only way to go)

You never taught your kid to spell, or do ANY history, or write in cursive.... You never had a single battle with your kid about doing her work because you didn't EXPECT her to do any??? You never tested her or graded her or MADE her do her math? You sat there and watched for days as your kid avoided doing anything resembling school work, and you LET this happen? You were COMFORTABLE with your fifth grade aged child NOT knowing how to multiply? You allowed your kid to tell you "no, I'm not interested in learning that"? Seriously?

You gave this kid zero study habits. Zero organizational and time management skills. Zero discipline. Zero ability to cope with real life...where you HAVE to do things that you don't want to do.

And you expect people to believe a kid raised like that could suddenly decide...on their OWN.... to go to public school and become a straight A student, accomplish this effortlessly....and clobber the ACT???

Yep. Because it's the truth. It happened.

People will invariably say to me...My kid would play video games all day, would never do any work, and would never motivate himself to accomplish anything. It would NOT work at my house!

Which again...are shockingly similar sentiments...to what regular school parents say to traditional home school parents. Homeschool? Without a real school environment, the kids would waste time, be unfocused, and would become socially handicapped. It would NEVER work at my house!

Here's my question. How do you know it wouldn't work?

I often hear traditional homeschoolers telling regular school families....if you just tried it for a year...you'd get it. You'd understand how much better it is...how many benefits come with the additional freedom. You'd see the results. But you have to give it a fair try.

It's sort of how I feel about Unschooling. I really think if more people let go and gave it a fair try for a year....they'd be shocked at the results.

But there are levels of indoctrination, and levels of deep belief....that people will not challenge. It's exactly like regular school-vs-homeschool. Some people will NEVER be convinced that home school is as good as or better than traditional school. Same with Unschooling. For many folks, it's just a bridge too far. Too far off the conventional path.

alexsmom
11-06-2014, 03:26 PM
I dont know that unschooling bothers people so much as it puzzles people how kids could decide to be productive on their own. And to be *productive enough*. I know that if I gave my son freedom to pick what he was going to do, it would be minecrafting all day for ages. Just like his room never gets cleaned unless theres a lot of reminding going on (sometimes threats too). Sometimes it seems the unschooling mythos is that if you let your kids do as they like, youll be pleasantly surprised that the room is clean at the end of the day.
I think in the business world, we are comfortable with to do lists, with having procedures, setting goals and working at them in a consistent manner. My main project in life right now is homeschooling my boy, how can I trust that it will all get done without these organizational skills and tools Ive spent a lifetime coming to believe in and rely on? If we decide to drop a subject we are working on with our kids for a while (like math!), it comes after a lot of thought about whether its good for our kid or not. Letting our kids make those decisions seems ludicrous.
My little one will be starting speech therapy because he doesnt say anything - its not something he spontaneously has decided to do yet. The speech therapist assures me that he *wants* to communicate, hes just not able to yet, and the goal of the therapy is to overcome whatever is blocking him from speaking. I think teaching our kids schooling is the same kind of thing - even if they dont see the value of whatever we are trying to get them to learn, that we are doing whats best for them in the long run.
Im not criticizing unschooling - Im trying to explain how it seems counter-intuitive as a way to get all the academic skills we want our kids to have.
For me still, unschooling as a core philosophy is still full of mystery. But I love when I can toss out my to-do list for a day or two to explore some rabbit trail.

CrazyMom
11-07-2014, 01:50 AM
Thanks for the thoughtful response. Everyone has to honor their own comfort level, and you're certainly not alone. Many people think homeschooling is unthinkable and ludicrous, and they follow their comfort level, too. They're not alone, either. Different strokes for different folks, ultimately. Some people do not deviate from what is accepted as "the way you must do it." It's just how they're built.

With unschooling, you probably won't have a clean room at the end of the day. Until the kid decides they WANT to clean their room...which admittedly might take months...or it might be done at the end of the day in a magnificent way that you never expected....or at the end of the year in a magnificent way you never expected. You never know until you let go and give it a chance. There's also the chance that you might just have to come to grips with the fact that your kid is different than you, and has a different comfort level with filth. LOL. People have different priorities. Kids are people.

Some parents can step back and LET it take months or accept their kid's difference in opinion. Some people can't let go, and have to force the issue. It's all good. Parents do their best. They love their kids. They do what they think will help their kids the most and is best for them.

My question becomes....how do we arrive at our idea of what is best for kids? Are previous generations of thought about what needs to be a part of education, by default, correct?

Why do people believe and rely on habits and skills and expectations...that are a social construct?

For me, I see the value in letting go and letting my kid decide what is important for her.

All the academic skills I wanted my kid to have...were miniscule compared to what she chose for herself.

That said, if she'd approached life in a completely different way...and she was a happy person who had a completely different plan in life than academics, I'd have been absolutely satisfied with her education. (For a while, I thought my kid might chuck formal education completely, and go to culinary school....she was utterly passionate about cooking. But eventually....she came to realize her early endeavors into cooking were really her first laboratory, and it was the science behind the food that intrigued her most)

People always say...how can kids be productive on their own? or productive enough to do what needs to get done?

My response is....define productive? define "needs to get done"?

There are a LOT of ideas about these things. Ultimately, the Unschooler says....my kid instinctually knows best what's best for her. I trust her to find her way. I trust her ideas of what's best for her.... MORE than I trust a social construct of what is best for her.

It's very much like a homeschooler who trusts themselves MORE than they trust the social construct of traditional schools.

Unschoolers just bump it up a notch (or maybe SEVERAL notches...lol)


To each their own. You've gotta do what makes sense to you and gives you peace. Public schoolers....turn out great every day. Traditional homeschoolers....turn out great every day. Unschoolers....turn out great every day. Kids from all three groups achieve great things. Kids from all three groups stumble and have big problems. Kids from all three groups....are a mystery to those in the other groups. LOL.

I just wanted to illustrate...that many of the false concerns people have about homeschooling.....are very much like the concerns people have about unschooling. Some people are comfortable in the box. Some people are comfortable with one foot in the box and one foot out of the box. And some people set the box on fire and dance in the ashes. It all works. There are many roads to the top of the mountain:) (and many ways to screw the journey up...and end up never reaching it)

We do our best. We love our kids. All of us. Here's hoping they all make it....to the peace and happiness at the top of their own personal mountain:)

crunchynerd
11-23-2014, 06:37 AM
When I consider all the good that most people took from all the crap they were made to do in school, that they remembered and used so little of one day after graduation, that didn't actually prepare them for anything except having the official paperwork that deemed them college-worthy (and a lot of what they learned in college was a repeat cycle of going through motions so as to get official paperwork that deemed them job-worthy), I sympathize completely with calling BS on the whole shenanigan, although it's worth noting that if you want to be a professional this or that, you have to have your papers, for most careers, whether the papers mean you actually know anything, or not.

However, I do not believe that my kids are founts of wisdom unto themselves, who would be better off if I never told them that they had to do something. I also know kids differ. Even in my family, I have a "born helpful" little fellow, who also likes things clean and orderly. I never believed there were such kids until I had him. Because his big brother is so "comfortable with filth" that he walks around with sticky, grimy, nasty hands unless I insist he washes them. He hates soap, and hates baths...until he comes out feeling so much better because he's clean, but it's the same battle again next time and it seems he just doesn't learn from experience, in this one area.

His self-regulation gizmo appears to be either broken or absent. So I can't say I believe that all kids are best left to their own inner wisdom. I won't say no kids, either, because now that I have one who at 2, used to say "Dis house is a disaster!" and go around picking up the living room, I know anything is possible.

IEF
11-23-2014, 12:26 PM
I reject the modern connotations of the label "unschooling", but still subscribe to Home Education Magazine, which I recommend as a good, balanced, not too extreme source of information about how unschooling can look in different families, and would be considered an unschooler by John Holt if I could hop in my time machine, go back to the '70s, and meet him.

I also recommend Pat Farenga's blog and Sue Patterson has been writing some very good articles lately and is apparently quite active on Facebook if you use it.

hth

CrazyMom
11-23-2014, 03:23 PM
Elle went through a really gross phase of not wanting to bathe daily, not wanting to keep her room cleanish, etc.

I didn't bug her about it....but one day, I called her over and said...Hey, can I borrow some filth?

I swabbed her hands and feet and ears. I gram stained them, and grew some cultures.

Interestingly....after looking into the microscope, and seeing photos of staph infections, fungal infections, etc (and looking at some really disgusting skin and ear infections on dogs and cats).....the kid decided she wanted to be more tidy. Go figure. LOL.

That said....I'm a big proponent of allowing kids be more filthy than the average mom because I believe it's healthier.

I think the immune systems needs something to do. If it's not coping with pathogens and getting some natural exercise....it gets creative and attacks the wrong thing. There's a lot of theory that an uptick in allergies coincides with kids whose living environments are "too clean".

Featured Stories, Department of Pediatrics (http://www.pediatrics.wisc.edu/featured-stories/allergies.html) This is a cool article about research that suggests kids exposed to dogs in infancy have significantly lower rates of atopic dermatitis and wheezing. Yep dogs are germy....wonderfully germy:)

crunchynerd
12-03-2014, 06:35 PM
Elle went through a really gross phase of not wanting to bathe daily, not wanting to keep her room cleanish, etc.

I didn't bug her about it....but one day, I called her over and said...Hey, can I borrow some filth?

I swabbed her hands and feet and ears. I gram stained them, and grew some cultures.

Interestingly....after looking into the microscope, and seeing photos of staph infections, fungal infections, etc (and looking at some really disgusting skin and ear infections on dogs and cats).....the kid decided she wanted to be more tidy. Go figure. LOL.

That said....I'm a big proponent of allowing kids be more filthy than the average mom because I believe it's healthier.

I think the immune systems needs something to do. If it's not coping with pathogens and getting some natural exercise....it gets creative and attacks the wrong thing. There's a lot of theory that an uptick in allergies coincides with kids whose living environments are "too clean".

Featured Stories, Department of Pediatrics (http://www.pediatrics.wisc.edu/featured-stories/allergies.html) This is a cool article about research that suggests kids exposed to dogs in infancy have significantly lower rates of atopic dermatitis and wheezing. Yep dogs are germy....wonderfully germy:)

I've heard of that theory too, and sorry to say, my kids all have food allergies, that started as breastfed infants, and it was NOT due to everything being too clean, or not being exposed to germs. We never use sanitizers, the kitchen floor has been more often disgusting than not over the last 10 years, my kids play in dirt, eat things off the floor if they drop, share beverage containers and even their toothbrushes routinely wind up in weird places around the house and then no one can remember whose is whose...

Their food allergies are there, despite us not being even remotely clean freaks, since we had the kids. Or before, really, if I can admit that. I think that theory is based on confusing correlation with causality. The other thing is, did people in the 1950s and 60s live much dirtier lives than we do today? I seriously doubt it. They ironed their sheets for heaven's sake! And could have people over without stressing about it. That's not the norm these days. But how come they weren't all having food allergies?

That theory just doesn't hold up, for me. But I wish it did, because then, my kids wouldn't have food allergies. I have them too, now, and never did before in my life. That's the other thing: adult-onset. It means something is causing this, it's not genetic, and it's not something that happened to our immune system as kids, unless it is something that has a delayed effect in my generation, but an immediate effect in my kids' generation.

Oh, and my kids didn't get food allergies from vaccines, either. They didn't have any, but had food allergies from the beginning.
And no, it's not because they had parents who had food allergies as kids. It's something we're being exposed to in our industrialized countries. Or many things or a combination of things? Who knows. I know the prevalence of most food allergies on maps of such, shows concentrations around industrial centers and major cities in the US, particularly in the East and Northeast, where the jet stream blows everything from everywhere else. We're downwind of everything. Maybe that's it?

alexsmom
12-03-2014, 06:44 PM
Uggg and I liked the Hygeine Hypothesis as to why I didnt have to keep things spic n span!

ikslo
12-04-2014, 09:43 AM
I've heard of that theory too, and sorry to say, my kids all have food allergies, that started as breastfed infants, and it was NOT due to everything being too clean, or not being exposed to germs. We never use sanitizers, the kitchen floor has been more often disgusting than not over the last 10 years, my kids play in dirt, eat things off the floor if they drop, share beverage containers and even their toothbrushes routinely wind up in weird places around the house and then no one can remember whose is whose...

Their food allergies are there, despite us not being even remotely clean freaks, since we had the kids. Or before, really, if I can admit that. I think that theory is based on confusing correlation with causality. The other thing is, did people in the 1950s and 60s live much dirtier lives than we do today? I seriously doubt it. They ironed their sheets for heaven's sake! And could have people over without stressing about it. That's not the norm these days. But how come they weren't all having food allergies?

That theory just doesn't hold up, for me. But I wish it did, because then, my kids wouldn't have food allergies. I have them too, now, and never did before in my life. That's the other thing: adult-onset. It means something is causing this, it's not genetic, and it's not something that happened to our immune system as kids, unless it is something that has a delayed effect in my generation, but an immediate effect in my kids' generation.

Oh, and my kids didn't get food allergies from vaccines, either. They didn't have any, but had food allergies from the beginning.
And no, it's not because they had parents who had food allergies as kids. It's something we're being exposed to in our industrialized countries. Or many things or a combination of things? Who knows. I know the prevalence of most food allergies on maps of such, shows concentrations around industrial centers and major cities in the US, particularly in the East and Northeast, where the jet stream blows everything from everywhere else. We're downwind of everything. Maybe that's it?

Same here. I could have written this word for word, except I only have one kid. :)

And we had a dog from before DS was born until he was about 3 - and it didn't prevent him from being allergic to dogs. The only thing that helped his wheezing was ridding the house of dog hair after the dog died, and eliminating all his food allergens from his diet.

crunchynerd
12-04-2014, 10:55 PM
Uggg and I liked the Hygeine Hypothesis as to why I didnt have to keep things spic n span!
I know what you mean... it would be so comforting, and so convenient, if it were true, too. I wish...

CrazyMom
12-05-2014, 12:08 AM
I did not mean to imply a flawless correlation=causation relationship with dirty homes and allergy free kids. Symptoms of allergies have a complex variety of causes. I certainly wouldn't argue with that.

I'm just saying the arc of data shows fewer allergies reported among kids from dirtier houses and more allergies among kids from cleaner houses. There could be many factors at play...detection bias, stress, many others. No, it's certainly not a sure thing.....but looking at the odds and making my best bet based on available data, I'd still opt for the dirtier house.

I don't believe vaccinations cause food allergies. We're strong vaccination advocates at my house. But to each their own.

modmom
12-29-2014, 02:01 PM
We are dipping our toes into unschooling. I'm calling it "child led learning." We will still do math and grammar, but that's it, everything else will be child led. It's a little scary but exciting!

CrazyMom
01-01-2015, 10:38 PM
Worked very well for us, modmom. Of course, each kid is different and each parent is different....ya'll all have to figure out together what learning style is the best fit....but for us? Unschooling was a perfect fit.

Stay excited and enjoy it! Best of luck:)