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View Full Version : Raising Hands and other herding mentalities...



Topsy
08-27-2010, 02:58 PM
So I just got back from a field trip where a discussion struck up about how one of the children who has just started homeschooling this year (after several years in public school) keeps raising his hand every time his mom asks him a question. The mom says it's like an automatic response he has - - even though he is the only child she is homeschooling!! :p So we got to talking about raising hands and other such mentalities that kids pick up in a classroom environment, and one of the moms piped up with this little ditty that I just HAD to share!

After a few years of homeschooling, little Johnny shows up for the first time for class at public school. The teacher explains to him that he can't go to the bathroom unless he raises two fingers. The boy looks at her, puzzled. "Uh, ma'am," he says, "how's that gonna stop it?"


hahahahahaha...I love my homeschool group!! ;)

farrarwilliams
08-27-2010, 03:15 PM
My kids raise their hands sometimes with me and they've never been to school ever. I'm thinking they learned it from TV?!?

wild_destiny
08-27-2010, 03:37 PM
Oh my goodness, Topsy! :) That is the funniest thing! Poor little Johnny!

MamaB2C
08-27-2010, 03:40 PM
The other day I was telling someone how bizarre I think it is to raise your hand to participate in a discussion of interest and to ask permission to use the restroom.

Some would argue that it is necessary to prevent chaos...one particularly nasty anti-homeschooler said it was necessary because they will have to do those things at work? Well, I have never had to ask permission to pee at work, though I may have had to ask someone to cover for me while I was doing so, nor do I find it necessary to raise my hand to speak in a meeting, so those things are not necessary.

dbmamaz
08-27-2010, 05:43 PM
I admit I had neighbors (when I lived in a REALLY bad neighborhood) who worked in factories and could only pee on scheduled breaks. just another hint that school is designed to build a better factory worker.

Sarbare0704
08-27-2010, 09:08 PM
haha that is really funny! I can honestly say I haven't found a need to raise my hand since I left school...

Teri
08-27-2010, 09:16 PM
Every now and then mine will raise their hands, but I have three and they are trying to get my attention and join in a discussion. It does come up at museum classes where there is a large group.
At co-op when I am teaching 15 kids at a time, it can be quite chaotic if there is not some system to recognize them. If we didn't, there are a few kids that would absolutely dominate conversations and some that would never get a word in.
As for bathroom at co-op, I like to know where they are going if they leave the classroom, just for safety. I can't have kids running around the building with no clue what I have done with them. :p
We do not ask permission for potty breaks at home.

Lperky
08-28-2010, 12:10 AM
Mine have never been to school either, but the older two raise their hands anyway! They work at the same table, and many times, I've been speaking to one for a few minutes, only to turn and finally notice that the other one has been sitting silently with his or her hand up, waiting for me to see. I find it hysterical because I have never asked them to do this. They must get it from extracurriculars and/or TV.

InstinctiveMom
08-28-2010, 12:57 AM
I was looking at my friend's dd's paperwork from school (same school & class that PeaGreen would be in this year) and it was an A-Z list of 'rules for 2nd grade'. I know that LittleBoyBlue had that same list, but my mentality has shifted COMPLETELY. So much of it seemed arbitrary and disrespectful to the kids.

I know that in a class of nearly 30, they have to have rules, but good grief!
~h

MamaB2C
08-28-2010, 08:48 AM
As for bathroom at co-op, I like to know where they are going if they leave the classroom, just for safety. I can't have kids running around the building with no clue what I have done with them.

I consider notification of one's absence and location a courtesy and safety precaution, for people of all ages. I mean, I tell my husband when I am going to run an errand or something. I don't consider that the same as asking permission, however.

Teri
08-28-2010, 09:38 AM
I consider notification of one's absence and location a courtesy and safety precaution, for people of all ages. I mean, I tell my husband when I am going to run an errand or something. I don't consider that the same as asking permission, however.

It's not that I want them to ask permission. However, if one just announced, "I'm going to the bathroom." There is a high probability that there would be six more kids that would announce the same thing. So they do ask and if more than one needs to go, they take turns so as not to disrupt the rest of the classes in the building or forget what their actual mission was. ;)

SunshineKris
08-28-2010, 11:20 AM
DD is still trying to get out of the habit of asking to use the bathroom. IN OUR OWN HOME!!! She was so used to that, and having her teacher say NO believe it or not. Now I get asking when in a co-op setting. Lots of people, one missing with out notification could be a problem and panic inducer. But at HOME?? She'll hopefully stop this nonsense soon. She's nearly 10 years old. Though she's only been out of a school setting since June.

AshleysMum
08-28-2010, 11:29 AM
We have that too! Ash is always raising her hand, even when talking to others such as the cashier in the grocery store. One day when Ash was doing her work at the dining room table, she was squirming around. When I asked her what was wrong, she absently said, "I'm waiting for the appropriate time to go to the bathroom." Ummmmm. To which I naturally told her if she had to go, get up and go! She was only in PS 1 1/2 years and homeschooled 6 months, but we've still much "undoing" to be done. The worse of which is when she makes a mistake, she expects someone to yell at her or belittle her, or having to be "perfect" so she doesn't get a "red face" on her work. Grrrr.

AshleysMum
08-28-2010, 11:41 AM
The other day I was telling someone how bizarre I think it is to raise your hand to participate in a discussion of interest and to ask permission to use the restroom.

Some would argue that it is necessary to prevent chaos...one particularly nasty anti-homeschooler said it was necessary because they will have to do those things at work? Well, I have never had to ask permission to pee at work, though I may have had to ask someone to cover for me while I was doing so, nor do I find it necessary to raise my hand to speak in a meeting, so those things are not necessary.

I hear ya. It reminds me of the book I read, "The Socialization Trap" (Rick Boyer). While it's obviously a Christian based book, it has great points that your post reminded me of, and one of the reasons we homeschool. The classroom setting at PS (and most private schools) is unique to schools - they won't have that when they get out into a job (ie: peer group settings, raising hands) or anything else. I can understand the need for such things at school (control of young minds who may not have learned self-control yet), but, as the book says, it's only in school and we have to relearn once we are out of school. In a perfect world, young kids have self control and don't have to pee at odd times. (snicker). Given the chance children will abandon all social constraints and run amok, screaming wildly (just go to a crowded McDonald's playland for proof) which is not conducive to a learning the daily lesson environment. I suppose. Ideally and in theory. My experience with PS is a relatively good idea gone bad with the "system", but I digress.

My own daughter has a weak bladder (TMI, I know but have to make the point) and has to "go" frequently. I find it interesting when in meetings when I worked outside the home, when you had something to say, you usually just looked at the moderator of the meeting and they knew you wanted a "turn", or waited for a moment of silence in a discussion to speak up. Or whomever had the loudest voice usually had the floor, LOL. As we grow up (ick) we become more in control and civilized (read: boring, LOL) without the need of teacher-imposed constraints. I am SO glad we homeschool.

Kylie
08-29-2010, 08:33 AM
LOL Topsy.

Here's a funny, that just had me nearly wetting myself. One of our mums in our homeschool area is an ex teacher, she insists her child (yes she is currently only homeschooling one as the others are littles) raises her hand. When I think of that I just can't stop laughing.

wild_destiny
08-29-2010, 12:26 PM
I have to confess, that when my 7 year old daughter and I are doing her formal, sitting at the table work, she raises her hand before she says anything, and she calls me teacher. The funny thing is she has never been in any type of public or private school or daycare, so she must have picked it up from TV. I certainly never have tried to say or imply that she must do either of these things, but she seems to like doing them. She calls it "doing school", and it seems to be some internal distinction that she is making between that and other activities in our day--and a distinction that she looks forward to eagerly. Go figure! :)

dbmamaz
08-29-2010, 12:51 PM
There was a kid in the home school drama class we used to take - he was 14 and his mom had been a teacher - he would ask her permission before going to the bathroom at the drama school (it was in the hallways, and she was always out there, waiting). Kinda gave me the creeps. He was totally deadpan, too - all the time.

Shoe
08-30-2010, 09:17 AM
I can't say I noticed it before, but this morning, when we "officially" started schooling, raised her hand to talk to me and asked if she can go to the bathroom...and was delighted when I told her it was quite okay to eat breakfast and have a cup of tea while homeschooling (as long as she was careful to not spill on her work). Now she's taking advantage of the flexibility to do some of her work independently in her room...and in her pajamas. Big changes for her!

Topsy
08-30-2010, 09:29 AM
I can't say I noticed it before, but this morning, when we "officially" started schooling, raised her hand to talk to me and asked if she can go to the bathroom...and was delighted when I told her it was quite okay to eat breakfast and have a cup of tea while homeschooling (as long as she was careful to not spill on her work). Now she's taking advantage of the flexibility to do some of her work independently in her room...and in her pajamas. Big changes for her!

Those ARE big changes, Shoe, and pretty good ones, too!! Has she hit culture shock yet?? ;)