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Shoe
08-21-2010, 06:01 PM
I was talking to a colleague of mine who homeschooled her daughter through high school, and she was saying that she was "encouraged" to have her daughter take the GED (General Educational Development) Tests (http://www.acenet.edu/Content/NavigationMenu/ged/index.htm) in order to apply for college, etc. (encouraged by college admissions personnel, I believe) and as a way to demonstrate "adequate" completion of high school.

It is certainly not required by law here, but I'm curious if others have decided to go that route, or if you've found it completely unnecessary. I still have several years before I'd have to worry about it, but would be interested in some opinions on it.

Thanks.

farrarwilliams
08-21-2010, 07:12 PM
This is so distant in our futures, it's hard for me to think... but I've heard of homeschoolers doing this as well and it always seemed strange to me. With no offense meant to the GED, I think of the GED as being less than a really quality high school education. Shouldn't whatever other proof you have to provide trump that anyway? But maybe not.

StartingOver
08-21-2010, 08:01 PM
I am against taking the GED, if only for the simple fact that my children worked way to hard to settle for it. Having said that, my daughter did take one on her own after she was 18, because the college she is going to wanted it. My sons have not, even though one is in the Navy and one Army ! The recruiters wanted them to, but they refused. Instead they brought in portfolios of their work, and had them evaluated. Both of them had no issue starting college, although those colleges also evaluated their portfolios.

fbfamily111
08-21-2010, 08:24 PM
I was homeschooled through high school, and when I applied at Indiana University, they insisted I take the GED. I was embarrassed, and furious! It was wrong that I had put in so much time and effort and all they wanted was a test. I knew they (the admissions lady) thought I wouldn't pass. They had a much higher score required to be accepted then just passing. I aced it. But never truly felt vindicated. They also made me take a remedial english and math course because I never took the SAT's. I hope that by the time my 4th grader gets to that point it will no longer be an issue.

MamaB2C
08-21-2010, 11:47 PM
Since "what about college" seems to be the number 2 question I get, I did some research. I've looked around at multiple colleges admission's standards and many have homeschool specific requirements right on their website. I don't remember any requiring a GED.

I suppose, if one really wants to apply to a specific university that requires it, they could then decide to do it, or to not and find another school.

InstinctiveMom
08-22-2010, 12:43 AM
I was homeschooled through a correspondence course that was accredited and issued a diploma. My mom augmented what I was learning (my younger sibs were homeschooled from younger ages) but she put them in the same course I was in for high school. My sister graduated, my brother quit and elected to do a GED program so he could work.

On one level, I'm opposed to the GED if your state recognizes homeschooling as a legal and valid route to completing one's education. I think that forcing a homeschooler to complete a test is... kinda offensive. On the other hand, if one has XYZ test in hand, then the body (state/admissions board/whatever) is assured that the student has a minimum level of knowledge... it's a multi-faceted issue, I think. I'm really not sure how I feel about it right now. We have plenty of time to think about it though :)

We're a long way from dealing with this dilemma in truth, so I'm curious to read what others have to say on the subject as well.
~h

Shoe
08-22-2010, 10:48 AM
I am against taking the GED, if only for the simple fact that my children worked way to hard to settle for it. Having said that, my daughter did take one on her own after she was 18, because the college she is going to wanted it. My sons have not, even though one is in the Navy and one Army ! The recruiters wanted them to, but they refused. Instead they brought in portfolios of their work, and had them evaluated. Both of them had no issue starting college, although those colleges also evaluated their portfolios.

While I don't necessarily feel it is "settling", it does seem a bit redundant to me. I'm glad to hear your sons had no issue starting college without it.


I was homeschooled trough high school, and when I applied at Indiana University, they insisted I take the GED. I was embarrassed, and furious! It was wrong that I had put in so much time and effort and all they wanted was a test. I knew they (the admissions lady) thought I wouldn't pass. They had a much higher score required to be accepted then just passing. I aced it. But never truly felt vindicated. They also made me take a remedial english and math course because I never took the SAT's. I hope that by the time my 4th grader gets to that point it will no longer be an issue.

Great to hear you aced it, but sad to hear they asked for it. It really stinks that you had to take remedial math and English courses. I think that I will have my kids do the SATs. It's so cool to "know" someone who herself was homeschooled all through high school. I look forward to picking your brains about your experiences as we continue our journey.


Since "what about college" seems to be the number 2 question I get, I did some research. I've looked around at multiple colleges admission's standards and many have homeschool specific requirements right on their website. I don't remember any requiring a GED.

I suppose, if one really wants to apply to a specific university that requires it, they could then decide to do it, or to not and find another school.

I'm glad to hear that. Since my kids are still of middle school age, I haven't really started to look into college entrance requirements yet, and the few university websites I have checked have made no mention of homeschooling at all. I'll probably start to research it a bit more over the course of this year when I start to plan out their high school program.


On one level, I'm opposed to the GED if your state recognizes homeschooling as a legal and valid route to completing one's education. I think that forcing a homeschooler to complete a test is... kinda offensive. On the other hand, if one has XYZ test in hand, then the body (state/admissions board/whatever) is assured that the student has a minimum level of knowledge...
That's kind of where I'm at right now. I can see that some authorities might want some kind of standardized measurement and evidence of completion of a course of study...but, the kids' portfolios should demonstrate the work they've done and the SAT's should give some standardized comparison. On principle, that should be enough.

Thanks for all the replies so far :).

Riceball_Mommy
08-22-2010, 11:04 AM
The public school website almost makes it sound like it's required to get a GED if you homeschool. But I've done research, even though my daughter is in Kindergarten I tend to worry... a lot. I've found many sites that either explain how to put together a diploma, give you a template, or will make one for you, if you want your homeschooler to have a diploma. I've also read that, a diploma with a transcript usually doesn't provide for any issues.
Of course none of this is my first hand experience anyway. If my daughter homeschools through high school I'll get a diploma (make it or order it), make up a transcript and keep a portfolio for her to back it all up. Hopefully by then that will be my than enough for admissions or anything else she may need it for.

Shoe
08-22-2010, 11:20 AM
The public school website almost makes it sound like it's required to get a GED if you homeschool. But I've done research, even though my daughter is in Kindergarten I tend to worry... a lot. I've found many sites that either explain how to put together a diploma, give you a template, or will make one for you, if you want your homeschooler to have a diploma. I've also read that, a diploma with a transcript usually doesn't provide for any issues.
Of course none of this is my first hand experience anyway. If my daughter homeschools through high school I'll get a diploma (make it or order it), make up a transcript and keep a portfolio for her to back it all up. Hopefully by then that will be my than enough for admissions or anything else she may need it for.
Here in NH, there is definitely no legal requirement to get a GED. In fact, in this state it would appear to be quite difficult to get one if you're under 18 and have finished a high school program early. You have to provide a portfolio and evidence that you have satisfactorily completed a high school course of study, since otherwise NH's compulsory attendance law requires you to still be in school. I'm hoping that a good portfolio along with my homeschool transcripts and diploma should be enough for most college admissions boards.

farrarwilliams
08-22-2010, 11:32 AM
Also, I've heard that some of the questions on the GED and the way it's written are clearly geared toward adults or young adults who are living independently - questions about household budgeting and working and so forth. That would seem to make it an inappropriate measure of a kid who's had their nose in calculus and history for the last year. Not that a kid shouldn't be able to do those things too... it just seems like a strange requirement. Especially if someone has SAT, ACT and/or AP scores to show.

MamaB2C
08-22-2010, 11:49 AM
I'm glad to hear that. Since my kids are still of middle school age, I haven't really started to look into college entrance requirements yet, and the few university websites I have checked have made no mention of homeschooling at all. I'll probably start to research it a bit more over the course of this year when I start to plan out their high school program.


My son is only 4, yet when I mention homeschooling I get "What about socialization" first, and "What about college" second.

It's insane.

Shoe
08-22-2010, 11:51 AM
Especially if someone has SAT, ACT and/or AP scores to show. Well, that's my impression. If you have a good portfolio and the kids have taken those other college entrance exams, then the GED would seem to be a redundant piece of paper. It wasn't designed to test a homeschooler's equivalency to the regular school system but rather provide a way for those who haven't had a formal high school education to show they have achieved equivalent learning. To me, homeschooling should be considered a formal education.

Shoe
08-22-2010, 11:52 AM
My son is only 4, yet when I mention homeschooling I get "What about socialization" first, and "What about college" second.

It's insane.

LOL, can't help it. That's just completely insane and doesn't make any sense at all.

MamaB2C
08-22-2010, 12:14 PM
I see it online too, so it must be a common misconception amongst those who haven't looked into the issue.

Riceball_Mommy
08-22-2010, 01:19 PM
Here in NH, there is definitely no legal requirement to get a GED. In fact, in this state it would appear to be quite difficult to get one if you're under 18 and have finished a high school program early. You have to provide a portfolio and evidence that you have satisfactorily completed a high school course of study, since otherwise NH's compulsory attendance law requires you to still be in school. I'm hoping that a good portfolio along with my homeschool transcripts and diploma should be enough for most college admissions boards.

I haven't seen any law or requirement for a GED for homeschoolers (in Maryland), it is the wording they use implies it, or at least that is how I interpret it. I figure if it was required it would spelled out in the law and on many different sites. The public school website makes it clear that homeschoolers can't get a diploma through the public schools (to me that seemed kind of obvious), and the only thing that would officially come from the state and say that you completed the requirements would be the GED.
"Students who are home schooled through Grade 12 do not receive a diploma from Baltimore County Public Schools. Diplomas can be awarded through accredited correspondence courses/schools or by the student passing the GED."

That kind of worried me so I did some research and that's when I saw that homeschoolers could create/order a diploma and have a transcript to back it up. I suppose though the real test of it is, what will a potential employer, recruiter, college, etc want to see.

AshleysMum
08-22-2010, 01:44 PM
In Tennessee, a homeschool high school diploma is the same as any other school. As it should be. http://www.hslda.org/hs/state/tn/200906040.asp
I just hope it's still in effect when my 2nd grader graduates and wants to go to college.

mommykicksbutt
08-22-2010, 01:46 PM
I'm against the GED. That is what drop-outs and quitters (some times it is the only or right choice) take so they can get a job or enlist in the military. It is a slap in the face to expect a graduated homeschooler to take this test. As an alternative perhaps the graduate has already acquired a college amount of knowledge in their favorite subject, a little bit of review with a REA book should assist them in passing a CLEP test to demonstrate that they can perform at the college level because they already have. Also, have they taken the SAT? How about the subject specific SATs? That too demonstrates college performance and some schools award college credit or advanced placement for those subjects, this should shut the discriminating admission's person up. The GED is not required by any state for homeschoolers. Let me repeat that, NO STATE REQUIRES THE GED FOR HOMESCHOOLERS!!!!! If this is a state sponsored school then they are discriminating against this homeschool graduate and that is illegal. (It may even apply to private schools as well). Perhaps they should seek legal counsel to pressure the admission's nitwit to accept this graduate (assuming all other admissions requirements are met).

AshleysMum
08-22-2010, 02:07 PM
What's sad, it's not difficult to graduate from a public school, so why the need for GED at all? And, as homeschoolers, we ensure our kids have an education, therefore have earned a diploma.

Busygoddess
08-22-2010, 06:02 PM
My kids will NOT take the GED. In IL, homeschools are considered private schools. So, they'll get a diploma when they complete the graduation requirements I've set. I'm using Homeschool Tracker for their transcripts, and I'll put together a portfolio, if needed. I also plan to have them both take the SAT & ACT. By the way (this may have changed since fbfamily's experience), the SAT & ACT have nothing to do with the college determining if the students take remedial courses. Students (at least those entering with no previous college credit, not sure about those who have credits through dual enrollment, or tests like CLEP) have to take placement tests in Math & English. It's the scores on those tests that determine if the student is ready for college level Math & English. If not, the student has to take remedial courses, which will not count as credit toward their degree.
In addition to their diploma, transcript, SAT & ACT scores, and (maybe) portfolio, my kids will also have some college credit before they enroll at a 4-yr university. Even if they wouldn't have all of that, any school that would require my kids to take the GED (which I find very insulting to a high school graduate) doesn't deserve to have the privilege of claiming my kids as students, anyway. If any school they apply to asks for a GED, that school will be marked off our list & we'll find another.

Now, that's just my opinion. I think it is insulting to expect someone, who worked hard & graduated from high school, to take a test associated with dropouts. I guess I can see a need for it, IF they cannot show any proof of completing high school level work - no portfolio, no SAT or ACT, no transcript, no diploma, no dual credit courses. However, nobody should be applying to a college with absolutely no way to show that they've done something academic prior to applying to college. That shows lack of common sense & organizational skills and either an inability or disinterest in researching the college's requirements prior to application. It would be like going to an interview for a job with no experience, no resume, and no idea what the company actually does or what your job would be - not exactly the best way to get a job.

dbmamaz
08-22-2010, 08:33 PM
Would you guys please try not to be so mean! "associated with dropouts", "drop-outs and quitters". GED is a perfectly acceptable option. I went to a homeschool convention where two long-term board members of the organization debated the topic, which they have disagreed on for 20 years. There is no right and wrong answer, and just because someone says "i've been homeschooled" is no guarentee that they are well-educated.

Its a choice, and I personally recommend you make your choices according to the outcomes, rather than according to your predjudices.

Busygoddess
08-22-2010, 09:07 PM
Would you guys please try not to be so mean! "associated with dropouts", "drop-outs and quitters". GED is a perfectly acceptable option. I went to a homeschool convention where two long-term board members of the organization debated the topic, which they have disagreed on for 20 years. There is no right and wrong answer, and just because someone says "i've been homeschooled" is no guarentee that they are well-educated.

Its a choice, and I personally recommend you make your choices according to the outcomes, rather than according to your predjudices.

First, I agree that being homeschooled does not automatically mean well-educated or even education comparable to that offered in ps.

Second, I worded mine that way for a reason. The GED is 'associated with drop-outs'. That is the perception people have of it. If two people, of equal intelligence & ambition, are standing there & one says he has a high school diploma and the other says he got his GED, most people will percieve the high school graduate as more intelligent, better educated, and more ambitious than the one who got a GED. The perception associated with the GED is that the person dropped out; that they didn't have the ambition, drive, persistence, or brains to get through high school. That may not always be the case, but that is how most people percieve it.
I won't have my kids work hard for years, to fulfill my very high standards & requirements, only to take a test that will make colleges and/or perspective employers look at them as though they are lazy, unambitious, unintelligent, and uneducated. I'm not saying that all people who get their GED instead of an actual diploma are lazy or stupid. I'm simply saying that due to the the common perception of the GED & the people who get it instead of a diploma, it's an insult to ask someone who worked to actually graduate to take that test.


ETA: I also stated that my post was just my opinion. I'm not passing judgement on anyone else & the choices they make. I'm simply stating my feelings & opinions on the topic

farrarwilliams
08-22-2010, 09:35 PM
Would you guys please try not to be so mean! "associated with dropouts", "drop-outs and quitters". GED is a perfectly acceptable option. I went to a homeschool convention where two long-term board members of the organization debated the topic, which they have disagreed on for 20 years. There is no right and wrong answer, and just because someone says "i've been homeschooled" is no guarentee that they are well-educated.

Its a choice, and I personally recommend you make your choices according to the outcomes, rather than according to your predjudices.

That language also makes me uncomfortable. I think it's not the right way to test a homeschool graduate for college admission, but I do feel like it's a positive option for many people. I know that many people think of it in these terms, but I don't at all. My primary association with it is actually with people who were denied opportunities when they were younger - in particular immigrants and people who grew up in poverty.

I actually think that the obsession with getting the right test scores or the right school or the right GPA or whatever is one of the reasons we homeschool. I would never malign someone who chose a different educational path for almost any reason. After all, *I* chose a different educational path for my kids and I don't want them maligned for it. Honestly, having taught in public high schools, I have a sort of respect for some of the kids who are high school dropouts. I encountered only two kids who dropped out when I was teaching and, while maybe this is unusual - after all, it's just my experience, both of them were very intelligent people with difficult home lives who decided to leave school because they saw through most of the crap that was thrown at them by the school system. One of them, before he left school near the end of the year, lined up a plumbing apprenticeship for himself. He used to drive teachers crazy by reading - physics, philosophy, all kinds of stuff in the middle of class instead of doing all the busy work they gave him.

Shoe
08-22-2010, 10:20 PM
Would you guys please try not to be so mean! "associated with dropouts", "drop-outs and quitters". GED is a perfectly acceptable option. I went to a homeschool convention where two long-term board members of the organization debated the topic, which they have disagreed on for 20 years. There is no right and wrong answer, and just because someone says "i've been homeschooled" is no guarentee that they are well-educated.

Its a choice, and I personally recommend you make your choices according to the outcomes, rather than according to your predjudices.

I apologize if I caused offense. I certainly meant none (and I personally didn't mention "dropouts" or "quitters"-I recognize that there are many reasons why one might not have an official high school diploma, possibly including home education). Nor do I have anything against the GED. I don't think it is demeaning for homeschoolers to do it...possibly just redundant. It was my understanding that the GED was developed for those who can't demonstrate that they have completed high school to show equivalent learning. Homeschoolers, in many cases, can show formal learning, and therefore, I would think it would not show much.

That said, I raised the question as it seemed to be a possible way on top of the SAT/ACT testing to demonstrate learning in a standardized way that is equivalent to the public school system, and was wondering if college admissions boards felt that way. I was after opinions and information, not making any judgments.

fbfamily111
08-23-2010, 12:43 AM
You have to understand, I attended college over 15 years ago. Where I grew up there were no other HS kids(that we knew of). Indiana University was happy to accept me(well almost all of them were), but they made me prove myself. We were what is now refered to as unschooled, (not my style of teaching) so there was very little documentation to back me up. I just remember wondering why the entrance exams wouldn't be enough. But they had their rules. Things have changed a lot over the years and will continue to change. I have no real concerns myself ... (no that's not true, I'm terrified of of high school math, but hey how much can 4 years of tutoring really cost?) Anyway, by the time my kids get there I expect it won't be a problem.

StartingOver
08-23-2010, 08:55 AM
While I don't necessarily feel it is "settling", it does seem a bit redundant to me. I'm glad to hear your sons had no issue starting college without it.

In Texas homeschools are considered private schools. We spent years, and major funds in our private school to educate our children. My Diploma and portfolio should be more than enough. I do see taking the General Equivalency Test is settling for less in our case.

Now don't get me wrong, I have a GED. But I didn't work my ass of in high school to get it. That is the difference !!!! I quit school, then later took an exam to says I had a general education. There is nothing general about my kid's educations.

I was a dropout, but I am not lazy or a quitter ! My story is my own.

Riceball_Mommy
08-23-2010, 09:55 AM
In Texas homeschools are considered private schools. We spent years, and major funds in our private school to educate our children. My Diploma and portfolio should be more than enough. I do see taking the General Equivalency Test is settling for less in our case.

Now don't get me wrong, I have a GED. But I didn't work my ass of in high school to get it. That is the difference !!!! I quit school, then later took an exam to says I had a general education. There is nothing general about my kid's educations.

I was a dropout, but I am not lazy or a quitter ! My story is my own.

I have to agree on the cost and redundancy. It looks like in Maryland you can't just take the test you have to take a class first. So not only would I have been spending a good bit of money to educate her but I would then have to put out the money for the class. As I remember as well the ACT and the SAT wasn't free, so of course you are already paying for those as well.

mommykicksbutt
08-23-2010, 11:16 AM
Would you guys please try not to be so mean! "associated with dropouts", "drop-outs and quitters". GED is a perfectly acceptable option. I went to a homeschool convention where two long-term board members of the organization debated the topic, which they have disagreed on for 20 years. There is no right and wrong answer, and just because someone says "i've been homeschooled" is no guarentee that they are well-educated.

Its a choice, and I personally recommend you make your choices according to the outcomes, rather than according to your predjudices.

WOW! Overly sensitive and totally out of context! When I wrote "drop-outs and quitters" you left out my parenthetical comment of "some times it is the only or right choice." But I see that you missed it. I still stand behind my comment that sometimes it is the only or right choice and it hits close to home. So your statement of being "so mean" is really out in left field. We are not being mean, we just don't have our head's in the sand and are stating what is just plainly evident.

Dropping out of school or being a school "quitter" was the right choice for my brother, who never finished high school, dropped out between his junior and senior year to join the Army at age 17 to get away from an abusive stepmother (we grew up in separate households). This was the right choice for him, he took and passed the GED and the Army took him. It was also the only choice for my step-dad (daddy to me). At age 17 before his senior year as well, he was kick out of his home by his drunk father, with no where else to go he joined the "new" Air Force. Daddy didn't get his high school diploma until I was in grad school. In both of these cases it was the right choice.

A very energetic, highly intelligent, and personable young woman worked at one of the fast food restaurants that the company I used to work for owned (I was the company's health and safety inspector). This kid was top notch, extremely sharp, she never missed an order and could keep a string of complicated orders, the amount due, calculate change back, all without any assistance (like the prompter or cash machine readout). This kid lied on her job app. She said she was 16, she was only 14. She was also a (junior) high school drop out. She was the sole support of her family. Her mother suffered from deep depression and mental illness and couldn't hold a job, she had about 5 or 6 younger siblings, and a father that abandon them and his where abouts unknown. Sure they were on social support but it wasn't enough. So this young lady quit school to work her ass off to support her family. When she turned 16 she confessed to her employer of her real age. The employer promoted her from shift manager to assistant store manager on the spot with the understanding that if she kept up her performance at her job she would be manager at 18 (the minimum age for the job) but that she also had to get either her high school diploma or a GED by then. For this case (there is other things about her circumstance) that being a "quitter" was her only option at the time.

And Busygoddess is right that there is a stigma associated with the GED vice a diploma whether you like it or not it is still there biasing people's opinions. The two smartest people I've ever known didn't have a high school diploma and some of the biggest-dumbest idiots I've ever encountered have doctorate's degrees! And yes, it is just our opinion as you are entitled to yours, we all are. When someone gives their opinion in support of fact it does not necessarily mean that they are being "mean", just that they are just "aware" perhaps.

Wmoon
08-23-2010, 11:57 AM
I love this thread! Even though I have a few years to think about this, it has been weighing heavy with me. I have heard that homeschoolers oppose the GED. I am still doing research to see what best suits my daughters.

wild_destiny
08-23-2010, 11:58 AM
I have been keeping up with this thread since Shoe started it, because my 18 year old son has been considering taking the GED. Actually, he has been stressed because he hasn't taken it yet, and thought that maybe being homeschooled his whole life, he was supposed to, so the views and information in this thread have been a relief to us. Since he started high school, we have had upheaval after upheaval after upheaval in our house, the result of which is that this same boy (man, now), who could read and write fluently by the time he was 4, is now behind in high school level maths and sciences (my fault, not his), so he has been thinking that the GED would somehow legitimize what he believes other people will see as an inferior education, although to be fair, he has engaged in a nearly continuous stream of study about many various subjects. (He will go to the library and stock up on books from the nonfiction section and devour them like some sort of book vampire, really absorbing the information from them.) College, unless it is online college, is not an option for us right now, but he is working at a fast food place, and considering what he might want to do beyond that. Anyway, thanks for some informative views about what is clearly a touchy subject. Good Monday, everybody! :)

Busygoddess
08-23-2010, 12:12 PM
My dad, who could not possibly be considered unintelligent or lazy, dropped out in his senior year to join the Marines & get away from his stepfather. Since then, he has gotten his GED, at least one degree (something in engineering), and recently got certified as a home inspector so he could start his own business in his spare time. So, I obviously know that not everyone that takes the GED is lazy or unintelligent, and I never meant to make it sound like I thought they were. If it came off that way, I do apologize for that. However, I stand by what I said. The GED is meant for those who did not graduate. Therefore, I feel it is insulting to expect a graduate to take it. The perception people have of the test & those who take it is not accurate for everyone who takes it. However, no matter how accurate/inaccurate or fair/unfair that perception is, that is the way most people see it. While I'm generally not concerned with what people think of my kids or me, I refuse to make them take a test that carries that kind of stigma, especially when it is totally unneccesary, which could greatly effect the way colleges see them when they apply.
That is just my opinion. Each of you is entitled to your own opinion & I repsect that. I meant everything I said, and wasn't trying to be mean. Maybe it could have been worded better. When I responded yesterday, I had only had about 2-3 hrs of very broken sleep since about 6 or 7am Saturday, because we went away for a few days & drove home Saturday night from two states (and one time zone) away. I was a bit tired & perhaps I worded things in a way other than what I meant. I was not trying to be offensive. If the perception many people have of those who have a GED instead of a diploma is offensive to you, I can't really help that, as it is not my fault. If the way I worded something made it sound as though I agree with the general perception, I do apologize for that, as that is not the case.

schwartzkari
08-23-2010, 07:56 PM
Before my Senior year of highschool in Michigan, my family moved to Texas. When my mother took me to sign up for my Senior year here, they told me that Michigan curriculum was behind Texas and that no matter what, even after taking the TAKs test and proving that I could take 12th grade courses, I would be placed back in 11th grade. For me, getting my GED was the best decision I ever made. I passed it with an extremely high score, got my first job and went to college early (when I was 17!) at the local community college. I framed my GED diploma and I'm proud of it.

In regards to homeschooling, I am keeping that option open for my children to decide. I will make them a high school diploma and their transcripts but if they decide that they would like a GED that's okay with me too. By the time they reach the age required to even test for a GED, they will be considered adults here in the state of Texas, therefore old enough to make their own decisions regarding their education and the path they want to take.

artmomz
08-23-2010, 09:24 PM
Before my Senior year of highschool in Michigan, my family moved to Texas. When my mother took me to sign up for my Senior year here, they told me that Michigan curriculum was behind Texas and that no matter what, even after taking the TAKs test and proving that I could take 12th grade courses, I would be placed back in 11th grade.

Wow...it gives me a chuckle because it's just so ridiculous. But wow...lol...

And it's still early for me to tell what my son will choose. I think society will have gone through some changes by then, possibly major ones, but I love that this topic was brought up. It doesn't hurt to at least scope the scene a bit.

schwartzkari
08-23-2010, 10:48 PM
Wow...it gives me a chuckle because it's just so ridiculous. But wow...lol...



lol, it was ridiculous! My mother and I had a meeting with the highschool principal and after he told me I had to do 11th grade again I looked at my mom and said "Can I just get my GED and go to college, please?" The look on the principals face was awesome...I think my interest in homeschooling might have started at that very moment ;)

artmomz
08-23-2010, 11:00 PM
So awesome! I wish I could have seen it!! LOL :D

mommykicksbutt
08-24-2010, 03:21 AM
lol, it was ridiculous! My mother and I had a meeting with the highschool principal and after he told me I had to do 11th grade again I looked at my mom and said "Can I just get my GED and go to college, please?" The look on the principals face was awesome...I think my interest in homeschooling might have started at that very moment ;)

Oh yeah! Love it! The look on the principal's face is now priceless to you, an awesome memory, thanks for sharing this moment with us. But Texas ahead of Michigan? I would have done the same thing and GTFO of there and head to college. This was the right choice.