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inmom
08-20-2010, 04:01 PM
Well, I'll just jump right in on the new forum!

Has anyone started or been part of a photography club? We are about book clubbed out with our teen group and are looking for something different and more creative. We plan to meet once a month for a couple of hours. Here are our ideas so far:

*plan monthly themes--ie. snow in winter, or parks, or sports
*use the 2 hours to either go somewhere to take pics and/or share and discuss some favorites
*use some time learning how to edit photos
*have professional photographer share ideas

Is there something more creative I may be missing? Being the nerdy/geeky math and science mom, I typically feel that my creative juices don't flow as well as for others.

BPier12
08-20-2010, 05:58 PM
Carol, these all sound like great ideas. Another thing you might want to add into the mix is to have the group look at the works of published photographers (Ansel Adams, Diane Arbus, for example) and encourage the kids to discuss how those artists use light, composition, etc. to create photographs.

wild_destiny
08-22-2010, 11:27 AM
Never thought of a photography club--that is a great idea! Thanks for some great ideas, Carol and Beth. And, btw, Carol, I would KILL to be a math and science mom! (My kids wish the same!) :)

Fiddler
08-24-2010, 02:57 PM
If the kids in the group are interested in nature photography, you might want to check your local Audubon site. Ours has a fantastic teacher/naturalist that has been running nature photography camps for 11-14-year-olds and things like fall foliage hikes for homeschooling families (and others). She'll be working with Jazz's co-op of like-aged kids this fall, and he's psyched.

Here's a link to check for centers by state:

http://www.audubon.org/locations/type/302

InstinctiveMom
08-28-2010, 03:11 AM
Those are some great ideas, Carol! I'm suggesting this for the older kids in our homeschool group.
~h

Karenwith4
09-01-2010, 01:48 AM
I love the idea of a photography co-op.

I've taken a few photography classes (here's my sadly neglected photo blog (http://anikonowner.blogspot.com/))and these are some of the exercises we have done to develop an "eye". Maybe some of these will work with your group.

~ Pick one design element and do a photo shoot focusing entirely on that element. (so spend the day shooting line, form, contrast, texture, balance, scale, colour, repetition, space etc)
~ Shoot 24 things from a perspective you wouldn't normally see (ie shoot from the side, laying down, from high above, framing using an angle.)
~ Shoot only one colour - or shoot only things that are contrasting colours. Shooting in black and white can be a real eye opener because it takes colour out of the equation and forces you to pay attention to other design elements (hard if you are a colour photographer like I am - I find black and white to be challenging).
~ Use 5 photos to tell a story (great for digging deeper than just one snapshot and developing an eye for context and flow)
~ Shoot a picture that portrays an emotion without using a face
~ Shoot out of focus, or shoot so that the main element of the picture is out of focus - ie I sometimes shoot pictures of my kids where something insignficant is in focus in the foreground and they are out of focus in the background.
~ Shoot movement

It is interesting to get some darkroom experience if you can manage a tour (many photographers who give lessons will also rent out their darkroom)

It would be fun to have a gallery showing of some sort at the end of your course.

Good luck
Karen

Rebecca in Texas
09-08-2010, 05:01 AM
Maybe visit a museum to look at other artist's photographs????

Rebecca in Texas
09-08-2010, 05:01 AM
You could also do a photography scavenger hunt.

bovinekitti
01-26-2011, 02:16 AM
I love the idea of a photography co-op.

I've taken a few photography classes (here's my sadly neglected photo blog (http://anikonowner.blogspot.com/))and these are some of the exercises we have done to develop an "eye". Maybe some of these will work with your group.

~ Pick one design element and do a photo shoot focusing entirely on that element. (so spend the day shooting line, form, contrast, texture, balance, scale, colour, repetition, space etc)
~ Shoot 24 things from a perspective you wouldn't normally see (ie shoot from the side, laying down, from high above, framing using an angle.)
~ Shoot only one colour - or shoot only things that are contrasting colours. Shooting in black and white can be a real eye opener because it takes colour out of the equation and forces you to pay attention to other design elements (hard if you are a colour photographer like I am - I find black and white to be challenging).
~ Use 5 photos to tell a story (great for digging deeper than just one snapshot and developing an eye for context and flow)
~ Shoot a picture that portrays an emotion without using a face
~ Shoot out of focus, or shoot so that the main element of the picture is out of focus - ie I sometimes shoot pictures of my kids where something insignficant is in focus in the foreground and they are out of focus in the background.
~ Shoot movement

It is interesting to get some darkroom experience if you can manage a tour (many photographers who give lessons will also rent out their darkroom)

It would be fun to have a gallery showing of some sort at the end of your course.

Good luck
Karen


All good suggestions (above). I was a photography major in college and worked professionally a number of years...long before my mom gig LOL.
Lessons on using some manual features from the camera will be important prior to any 'assignment' (esp. those w/digital SLR cameras). ie: 'Focus' would be a good way to isolate that feature of the camera. Have the students turn off their auto-focus for this.

I'd also like to add the Self-Portrait as another lesson. Look to Cindy Sherman and others (names escape me this late at night).
Telling a story with the lens is another lesson. Imagine telling a story about 'Autumn' (or another open-ended topic). Have students tell a story with 6-10 photos, no words. Imagine the 'book' is for a younger child that can not read yet. Show books before hand that illustrate this point and take time to discuss what makes the photos in each book special...the whole point of the book, as well as the techniques used in each photo to tell the story. This is the sort of assignment that would need to be done after the students are comfortable with their cameras as well as photographic techniques/composition, etc.
Here's MY quick idea for 'Autumn'. (page 1, looking upward at the sky, with graphic tree/leaves; sun shining through; page 2, illustrate movement of single leaf fluttering down; page 3, looking down at ground, extreme close-up of leaf on ground, some mud/snow, frost, etc. can see structure and dried texture of leaf; page 4, same tree or similar from distance with bare branches.)