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aspiecat
03-22-2014, 11:03 AM
Thinking about enrolling DS (14) into an online public school for his Sophomore year. We are looking to move to Colorado (we're currently in Kentucky) later this year and, as we're not sure when that will happen, we think it's best for DS to leave his local HS and be homeschooled.

He's been homeschooled before, age 9 - 11, and loved it. But I had to go back to work, so back to school he went. Now, he's academically very good, but has Asperger Syndrome...well, I bet there are enough of you here who know how that can complicate things. He only started at his first American school this January (Semester 2), and has had only one full week of school so far, what with the Polar Vortex closing our County's schools so often this winter. And what with teachers refusing to do what he requires - basically ensuring he has all the correct information so he can do the work and knows what tests are coming up so he knows what he is focusing on in revision - we are all becoming more and more frustrated. Blah, blah.

We think allowing him the stability of a whole academic year (more, if it works out) with an online school, even though I will be working for part of it, is the best thing all-round. His stepdad will be able to help him out as my husband works from home.

I looked at K12, but as we are currently in KY, we can't do their public schooling - the KDE doesn't (read: refuses to, ROFL) fund such things - and would have to use one of three private online schools, which are too costly.

Any suggestions for similar online public schooling we can utilise and is not restrictive?

Thanks,
Aspiecat

rebjc
03-22-2014, 12:22 PM
Time 4 Learning isn't very costly. But I can't speak to it on a high school level.

aspiecat
03-22-2014, 01:34 PM
We actually tried Time 4 Learning when we first got to the US, so DS could get some background curriculum prior to starting the local HS Jan this year. But there was an expectation in the English lessons to learn entire passages of a story or poem off by heart in order to answer comprehension questions. Plus Math was strange...the tutor mumbled most of the time and we couldn't understand what he was saying - not even my American hubby could! LOL Needless to say, we gave up after one month...

dbmamaz
03-22-2014, 07:35 PM
I've heard good and bad about Keystone. You could also try piecing together individual classes.

Batgirl
03-22-2014, 07:51 PM
Calvert is creating an online high school option but they'll only have 9th grade ready for this fall. Bummer.

CrazyCatWoman
03-23-2014, 11:55 PM
Will he be starting the school year on the academic schedule? For K12 that may make a difference - I have heard of people who start mid year in high school having to complete ALL the work from the beginning of the year. (Not like if he transferred in to a regular high school.) This "may" be up to the state in which you are moving to, so call up the K12 now and ask to talk specifically to people in CO and find out what their expectations are. Don't settle for someone at the 800 number, ask to specifically talk to people in the state. And if your son has a 504 or IEP, then ask to talk to the lead special education person as well to make sure that accommodations will be the same.

aspiecat
03-24-2014, 06:30 AM
We're actually looking to take him out of school after Spring Break, rather than at the end of the year, and will take him through the Freshman-level things he has missed out on between then and the end of the summer break. At least that is our plan. We might have to look at putting together a curriculum for him in the meantime if we can't enroll him in an online public school.

We *were* planning to start him with K12 at the start of the 2014-2015 academic year, even if we stop schooling before the end of his Freshman year. We still could let him go through to the end of this school year, but the HS won't modify his end of year exams to allow for the fact he (a) only started at this school this semester, so hasn't had half the year's instruction, and (b) is from another country, so can't call upon what he's learned in another school/county/state. They said he'd just have to take it upon himself to learn everything he's missed if he is to pass the EOY exams, which is hugely unfair, particularly as the IEP they're designing for him is meant to allow for this fact.

dbmamaz
03-24-2014, 09:15 AM
k12 is also going to be rigid about testing - you're still a public school student if you're enrolled in it. I am graduating a kid from homeschool and sending him to community college having never used any 'accredited' courses

aspiecat
03-24-2014, 09:35 AM
k12 is also going to be rigid about testing - you're still a public school student if you're enrolled in it. I am graduating a kid from homeschool and sending him to community college having never used any 'accredited' courses

Thanks, db. I already have Math U See's Algebra I and Geometry, as DS likes 'seeing' what he's doing and we used this curriculum last time we homeschooled. So probably investing in OM or similar to do the other subject areas might be a good idea. And DS is keen going to community college in a couple of years (he is turning 15 this year) to get some tertiary credits under his belt.

Melyssa
03-25-2014, 01:15 PM
I live in Colorado and my daughter attends a once weekly "options" program. She gets school credit and teachers to help with her subjects which is invaluable since she has far outgrown me with math and some other things. It works well for now. I only manage history at home, and her extras like piano. Everything else is through the school.

aspiecat
03-25-2014, 01:45 PM
I live in Colorado and my daughter attends a once weekly "options" program. She gets school credit and teachers to help with her subjects which is invaluable since she has far outgrown me with math and some other things. It works well for now. I only manage history at home, and her extras like piano. Everything else is through the school.

Melyssa, as we are looking to move to Colorado - and Westminster is one of the areas that appeal - the options program sounds interesting. Can you tell me more about it? DS is 14, your DD's age, so any info you can give me would be very welcome!

Melyssa
03-25-2014, 10:30 PM
Many of the school districts here have the "options" programs. (names may vary) I know they are around in Denver, Arvada, Westminster, Broomfield, Boulder, Brighton, Longmont and maybe other areas. They can be googled or found on the school district websites directly. Basically, your student is a part-time public school student and attends the program one day per week 8-3 with 6 classes. You can focus on core classes or just use it for enrichment stuff like art and drama. They do offer a diploma and things like concurrent enrollment college courses for high school. The programs aren't perfect but I've always just viewed it as a way for some extra social interaction once a week for her, and now at this point it is nice she has a real math teacher since Algebra 2 is way over my head. LOL And the interaction with teachers is good for her too at this point since college is right around the corner and mom won't be the teacher then anyway. It's a nice alternative to a regular public school situation especially for high school. The school also offers occasional "teen nights" and holiday parties, end of year picnic, etc. Parents are required to volunteer about 6 hours per year in some capacity. You get a list of choices at the beginning of the year. That is about it.

HickoryGlenFarms
05-16-2014, 10:20 AM
Hey Aspiecat, Google BAVEL. It's free if your county is included in their agreement. I've been looking at it as an option for us too.

QueenBee
05-22-2014, 08:31 AM
Many of the school districts here have the "options" programs. (names may vary) I know they are around in Denver, Arvada, Westminster, Broomfield, Boulder, Brighton, Longmont and maybe other areas. They can be googled or found on the school district websites directly. Basically, your student is a part-time public school student and attends the program one day per week 8-3 with 6 classes. You can focus on core classes or just use it for enrichment stuff like art and drama. They do offer a diploma and things like concurrent enrollment college courses for high school. The programs aren't perfect but I've always just viewed it as a way for some extra social interaction once a week for her, and now at this point it is nice she has a real math teacher since Algebra 2 is way over my head. LOL And the interaction with teachers is good for her too at this point since college is right around the corner and mom won't be the teacher then anyway. It's a nice alternative to a regular public school situation especially for high school. The school also offers occasional "teen nights" and holiday parties, end of year picnic, etc. Parents are required to volunteer about 6 hours per year in some capacity. You get a list of choices at the beginning of the year. That is about it.

This is exactly what we're looking for.... I need to move to Colorado! Sigh.