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Solong
02-08-2014, 04:27 PM
Do your kiddos have hobbies? Dd9 is looking for something smallish she can do on her top bunk (away from brother), will pack away easily, and she can 'organize' or 'design'. I'd like it to be cheap and require no help from me.

murphs_mom
02-08-2014, 04:45 PM
DD draws (sketchbook and pencil/pen), does a little crochet (yarn and a hook), likes to make simple jewelry (some beads and elastic), and weaving (small loom and stretchy loops). Of those, the drawing is probably the cheapest.

AddlepatedMonkeyMama
02-08-2014, 05:10 PM
Carolyn said what I was going to suggest! I would only add that my kids like making little books--just a few sheets of paper folded in half and stapled--about various things. They've made everything from comic books to illustrated stories to reference books (kinds of pets, dragons, imaginary characters, Pig Latin dictionary, etc.).

My daughter also likes to embroider simple pictures with burlap and yarn.

jsaffold
02-08-2014, 05:25 PM
My daughter has a slew of hobbies...but most require some prep or teaching from me to begin.. like loom knitting.. she caught on really quick, and doesnt usually need me for that any more.
One thing she does that I have no hand in is sculpting little dragons and animals etc out of sculpting beeswax.. ( she keeps in a little dollor store basket on her bunk) you can buy it on amazon form a set of 6 colors up to 15 I think... and they last forever, and can be reused over and over.
She just started making paper beads.. I was the one to start that for me..lol.. and she jump in on her own.. old magazines, glue sticks and tooth picks. lots of you tube videos out there that give the basics.

deannajo
02-08-2014, 06:37 PM
Rainbow loom! My nine year old loves hers, and started with bracelets, then moved on to little animals, and now she designs her own stuff. I haven't helped her at all, but she will use youtube videos for ideas, patterns, etc....the loom and bands can be found at Michaels, and its affordable. Knock-offs can also be found, but there's a difference in quality for sure....especially in the bands, our knock-off bands tend to break.

Mariam
02-08-2014, 07:42 PM
For the doll house, I would suggest using cereal boxes, egg cartons and the like to create the house and the furniture. Paper scraps for wall paper, fabric scraps for decorating such as curtains, bedding and the like. There are lots of great suggestions on how to make the house and furniture on Pinterest. Mine wanted the Rapunzel tower, from Tangled. We use a Pringles can and an oatmeal container, cut and decorated, made a nice tower for playing. The only cost was some art supplies for paint, paper, glue and the like.

farrarwilliams
02-08-2014, 09:22 PM
I was really into calligraphy at that age.

How about sewing?

How about origami? You can do some really complex stuff when you get into it.

murphs_mom
02-08-2014, 10:07 PM
We did the cardboard box dollhouse and dog house thing for several years (ages 2-5) and she LOVED doing it. She'd spend hours working on it and playing with it. In her case, though, the things took up a lot of space while making them AND storing them afterward. Eventually we made the move to the 'official' dollhouse w/the overpriced furniture (relatives gave her a room or two for xmas & b'day that year...saved us a TON of money). The cardboard ones were awesome though!

Your daughter mentioned doll furniture...when DD was doing her cardboard box houses, I found some balsa wood furniture kits at Michaels. The pieces were perforated in sheets and you punch them out, marry up the slots, and can glue and paint them to make them sturdier. I wouldn't recommend doing the glue/paint stage in bed, but the punching out, matching up the pieces (I think each box was $3 or so and made 10-12 pieces of furniture), and then playing with them later once they're done could easily be done in bed or a small room. It's been a while since she got those, but I want to say they were from Creatology. They also had doll houses, castles, barns, boats, etc. that DH and DD spent time working on. They were pretty inexpensive and kept her busy for quite a while.

Avalon
02-09-2014, 11:09 AM
Paper dolls might work. There are some beautiful books with stiff dolls and lots of beautiful outfits that you can cut out. They could live happily inside the cardboard house that Mariam recommended.

My daughter also enjoyed making fairies from this klutz book: Fairies: Petal People You Make Yourself (Klutz): Rachel Haab: 9781591748021: Amazon.com: Books (http://www.amazon.com/Fairies-Petal-People-Yourself-Klutz/dp/159174802X)

Solong
02-09-2014, 05:01 PM
Paper dolls and a paper house; off to google while I have my first coffee at 2:00pm (poor me).

You made me remember the Toymaker (http://thetoymaker.com/2Toys.html)!! She popped into my brain just as I realized I'd finished all the mac and cheese. Gross (mach and cheese, not the toymaker).

Avalon
02-09-2014, 10:50 PM
You made me remember the Toymaker (http://thetoymaker.com/2Toys.html)!! She popped into my brain just as I realized I'd finished all the mac and cheese. Gross (mach and cheese, not the toymaker).

OMG! That toymaker page is gorgeous!!! I wish I'd seen it when dd was smaller. What the heck, she'll probably still love it (14 isn't too old for paper dolls, is it?)

Christen99
02-10-2014, 03:51 AM
Knitting, crochet, weaving, journaling, sketching/drawing, reading, hand quilting/sewing, sculpting with beeswax (much less messy than clay so it could be done on a bed).

I started knitting a few years ago, and I found a really great DVD to learn. Teen Knit Cafe is designed to teach teens, but as an adult I felt it was really easy to follow. Maybe you could learn together? I also found that Very Pink Knits has some really excellent video tutorials for every aspect of knitting. Even though it's geared towards adults, it is clear and concise.

jsaffold
02-10-2014, 09:08 AM
Ooooooo I found a latch hook rug kit that I started ages ago....dragging that bad boy out today.

CrunchyNoVa
02-10-2014, 09:45 AM
My boy's don't really have any hobbies yet. They do love the Usborne sticker books though, that's probably as close to a hobby as they get! There are some really neat ones for girls. They have a Victorian dollhouse one, fashion of the 1920's, period costumes, etc. There's also a jewelry and fashion design kit that comes in its own little carry case.

When I younger my sister and I would spend hours with a large sheet of paper, scissors, glue, and the JcPenny catalog. We'd draw a floor plan on the paper and then cut out the furniture we wanted for each room, we'd cut out pictures of people from the clothing section and build our little family. The catalog was huge so we could make so many of them and for different seasons too!

jsaffold
02-10-2014, 11:45 AM
Paper dolls and a paper house; off to google while I have my first coffee at 2:00pm (poor me).

You made me remember the Toymaker (http://thetoymaker.com/2Toys.html)!! She popped into my brain just as I realized I'd finished all the mac and cheese. Gross (mach and cheese, not the toymaker).

OH MUH GOSH..
Thank you for this link!!.. we have about 6 'marble mouses' racing around the floor now:o

ikslo
02-10-2014, 11:51 AM
OH MUH GOSH..
Thank you for this link!!.. we have about 6 'marble mouses' racing around the floor now:o

So glad you mentioned marble mice, because I didn't even click on the link thinking it was just paper dolls, which DS would not be interested in (unless he could shoot them with his Nerf guns). I see some marble mice races in my future. :)

ETA: He loves his mice, despite:

1) the fact that I made him cut them out this time to practice "scissor work" just because I wanted to hang out on SHS
2) the printer has apparently run out of blue and yellow ink, so his mice are both magenta

iddieCat2
02-22-2014, 12:18 PM
I second the Rainbow Loom. My daughter loves it! She has made bracelets for all of her friends and family. The downside is the fact that it is made from small rubber bands.

Maybe she can learn how to make friendship bracelets with embroidery thread. This would be a really good activity considering it isn't that messy and projects can be put away unfinished and brought out again at a later time to finish. Pinterest has really great step-by-step tutorials for all different ways to make them. Embroidery thread is really cheap and comes in every kind of color imaginable.

Emerald
02-22-2014, 12:39 PM
So many cool suggestions here!

Has origami been mentioned?

WindSong
02-22-2014, 12:59 PM
A friend of mine showed me how to make infinity t-shirt scarves (http://www.everydayfamily.com/blog/diy-infinity-scarf-from-t-shirt/). Her dd made a lot of them for Christmas gifts. It's free and a great way to recycle those old t-shirts.

Teri
02-22-2014, 02:08 PM
Rainbow loom, sketch books, croqui pad, knitting, origami, sock pets, reading, sewing and making up their own trading card games are all things that my kids enjoy.

HappilyUprooted
02-23-2014, 09:26 PM
I haven't read all the replies yet, but I have to recommend Wreck This Journal (http://www.amazon.com/Wreck-This-Journal-Black-Expanded/dp/0399161945)! My kids LOVE it! It is like a messy, crazy art journal!

jsaffold
02-23-2014, 09:37 PM
I haven't read all the replies yet, but I have to recommend Wreck This Journal (http://www.amazon.com/Wreck-This-Journal-Black-Expanded/dp/0399161945)! My kids LOVE it! It is like a messy, crazy art journal!

YES!!! My daughter and I have had these for a couple years..and she bought one for her friend....and help each other" wreck" them. I have the whole series now... We love them

HappilyUprooted
02-23-2014, 09:41 PM
YES!!! My daughter and I have had these for a couple years..and she bought one for her friend....and help each other" wreck" them. I have the whole series now... We love them


My boys think it is hilarious… uh… except the one section where it says POOP can be wiped there. My boys were all excited until I told them NO WAY! lol

iris0110
02-24-2014, 12:17 PM
My boys love sketching and doodling. They each have a sketch book that my friend in Germany sent them special for their art. I bought them some of the "how to draw" books cheap at Library sales and Half Price Books and they enjoy that or just drawing whatever comes to mind. My oldest wants very badly to learn to crochet (I crochet and knit) but he struggles with it. I am not the best teacher (yes I get that I homeschool him but I'm not) and he has dysgraphia among other dexterity issues making it a struggle. He also has a little spool knit kit that he is hoping to learn to use soon. My youngest likes model kits.

jsaffold
02-24-2014, 04:57 PM
My boys think it is hilarious… uh… except the one section where it says POOP can be wiped there. My boys were all excited until I told them NO WAY! lol

Ya we were all like " seriously? Ummm no.." Then they got giggly with brown markers and crayons...I'm sure u can imagine.... Then they found the brown air dry clay..... Good grief.