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sandra
01-12-2014, 04:44 PM
Is Algebra and Geometry REQUIRED for H.S. homeschoolers to graduate? Can I use General Business Math, Consumer Math, etc. for 4 years to satisfy the requirement?

farrarwilliams
01-12-2014, 06:00 PM
Requirements depend on your state.

If you want a child to attend college, then you really should teach basic algebra and geometry. If a child is capable, then I would also say you should try to teach them, even if the child is unsure about college. If this is something you struggle with, there are computer based and online programs that you might use.

Of course, some students have learning issues and can't do high school math for various reasons, but otherwise, I would encourage you to think about a way to accomplish those classes instead of avoiding them.

Teri
01-12-2014, 06:11 PM
What Farrar said.
For us, in Texas, with requirements set by the individual homeschool, we are using college entrance requirements as our requirement.

Topsy
01-13-2014, 01:54 PM
Keep in mind there are NO actual graduation requirements for homeschoolers in ANY state...parents decide when their students graduate and they decide on the requirements. State graduation requirements do not apply to homeschoolers. With that in mind, however, it IS extremely wise to research what colleges (even community colleges) require, subject-wise when planning out coursework. We got burned, for instance, when we discovered (too late!) that our NC state colleges require advanced math. Even though my son took advanced math in community college, they have a requirement that it HAS to have been taken during high school, or you can't be accepted in any NC state college. BIG bummer for us to have learned that after-the-fact.

ksb427
01-13-2014, 03:46 PM
Keep in mind there are NO actual graduation requirements for homeschoolers in ANY state...parents decide when their students graduate and they decide on the requirements. State graduation requirements do not apply to homeschoolers. With that in mind, however, it IS extremely wise to research what colleges (even community colleges) require, subject-wise when planning out coursework. We got burned, for instance, when we discovered (too late!) that our NC state colleges require advanced math. Even though my son took advanced math in community college, they have a requirement that it HAS to have been taken during high school, or you can't be accepted in any NC state college. BIG bummer for us to have learned that after-the-fact.

Wow... good to know!

dbmamaz
01-13-2014, 03:51 PM
Ok, now I want to know what 'advanced' means? My plan is for my son to take pre-calc at community college - which, i mean, my daughter did too - but she did dual enroll. However, she didnt actually finish it while dual enrolled, she finished it as a full time student at the community college, and was accepted as a transfer to the university. In art, though.

farrarwilliams
01-13-2014, 03:54 PM
Yeah, that's very vague language.

Teri
01-13-2014, 04:16 PM
Hmm...that seems like it was a random admissions counselor interpretation of what NC requires, maybe? It doesn't say anything on their website that the courses had to be in high school. Course & Admission Requirements (http://www.northcarolina.edu/aa/admissions/requirements.htm)
I think that would be worth raising heck about.

farrarwilliams
01-13-2014, 04:32 PM
Honestly, while some of the UNC campuses can afford to be picky, it seems that it would be pretty dump for AppState or UNCA or something to turn down an applicant for having taken their algebra II requirement dual-enrolled... But I may not be understanding the ins and outs...

ksb427
01-13-2014, 07:47 PM
Ok, now I want to know what 'advanced' means? My plan is for my son to take pre-calc at community college - which, i mean, my daughter did too - but she did dual enroll. However, she didnt actually finish it while dual enrolled, she finished it as a full time student at the community college, and was accepted as a transfer to the university. In art, though.

I would think a class where Algebra II is a prerequisite such as Pre-Calculus, Calculus, Statistics, etc.?

kohlby
01-23-2014, 01:32 PM
College Algebra is a lower level college math class, so that could be one reason for not accepting it. (Though I noticed Duke wouldn't let dual enrollement classes count for both in order to count for credit - it either had to be counted as high school or college). My first college didn't have any math classes earlier than Calculus I. If you wanted to take advanced math at a community college but not for high school credit, then it wouldn't be an issue if you were a transfer student. So, that's one way around it. Another way is to look into AP classes instead of dual enrollment. Do check with the schools to see what the accept. A third option, and it seems like the least likely to work, is to take CLEP exams. CLEP exams give college credit for the courses. And since the courses themselves can be counted as high school classes, you're getting credit for the exam for college and the course for high school. However, I've found there aren't a lot of colleges I looked at that accepted CLEP. I didn't look at a lot, as my eldest still has some time, but I was curious if it made sense for him to start taking CLEP exams soon - and the answer was no based on what I found.

I agree that advanced high school math is anything after Alg II. So Alg I, Alg II, Geometry, Consumer Math, and Business Math generally do not count. Pre-Calculus, Calculus, Linear Algebra, Discrete Math, Statistics, Probability, and Number Theory can all count. (Though, the last few would need to be on the right level of course. For example, I wouldn't consider AoPS's Intro to Number Theory to count, but an Advanced class would).

Think about your student's post-high school plans. And think about trying not to limit them if the student changes his/her mind. At a minimum, most students should take Alg I, Alg II, and Geometry in high school. I don't know of any public high schools that require students to take any less than that, unless there are special needs that make it impossible for the child. Even taking those three, there's still a year for developmental math before Alg I if the student isn't ready for Alg I. Or consumer/business math at some point if the student did start at Alg I on time.