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Solong
12-20-2013, 01:40 PM
Trying to move the long-division diversion over here, since my waldorf suggestion inspired some debate over waldorf math methods :)

farrarwilliams
12-20-2013, 11:33 PM
I'd be curious to hear more... I'll admit off the bat though that I'm kind of a Waldorf hater and I'm definitely a Waldorf skeptic. But I've never really understood what the heck Waldorf math was supposed to be even all about. Except you were supposed to count with gnomes. For some reason.

Norm Deplume
12-21-2013, 11:48 AM
I'd be interested too. I'm pretty familiar with Waldorf as a early education philosophy (a good friend of mine is a Waldorf kindergarten "teacher," but I have really very little knowledge about how Waldorf works with older kids. I am not much of a fairies & gnomes person, but I'm interested in non-standard maths. My son and numbers don't get along so well. He's a words person, and was well on his way to becoming math-phobic when I pulled him home this fall (thanks, public school math curriculum!).

Solong
12-21-2013, 12:46 PM
I will also confess that I have actively rejected Steiner 'philosophy' and Waldorf schools as publicly funded institutions. We've looked closely at their history and science programs. The history is too Eurocentric, the science too broad and shallow. Dd prefers to go really in depth, one topic at a time. They might work for others.

The math incorporates two really great traits of waldorf methods: storytelling and art. If your child is a verbal, artistic, kinaesthetic, or spatial learner - it might be a good option. I'm not sure why waldorf schools perpetuate this evasive vibe, but they obviously do. The methods aren't complicated. I sometimes think the schools and teachers unnecessarily complicate them, to justify outrageous tuition rates :rolleyes: Or, they actually believe in 'anthroposophy'.

I use Jamie York's books. They are straight-forward and provide a solid math curriculum. There are free downloads on his site, and I wrote a review on this site. It is regular, eggular math. The only differences are removing the pressure to move on before a concept is mastered, the storytelling, the art.

It has been a learning curve for me (as has the soroban), since I need to learn a new method of delivery before I can deliver it. The stories and artwork DO have a subtlety - each detail becomes important in the end. Leave out the little stuff, and you'll be left scratching your head. Example - why the chimney? The remainder needs to brought up, and written next to the rest of the answer. We've used waldorf for multiplication, division, factors, prime factors, and fractions so far. If you have specific questions about any of those, I can write a post with pictures.

farrarwilliams
12-21-2013, 02:25 PM
But the soroban isn't connected with Waldorf, is it? That's just the Japanese style abacus, right? There was a cool section about the mental abacus in Here's Looking at Euclid, by the way. We always did the RS style abacus, though I can use an Asian one. But in the end we settled on the C-rods. And thus my C-rod obsession was born.

Solong
12-21-2013, 06:48 PM
But the soroban isn't connected with Waldorf, is it? That's just the Japanese style abacus, right? There was a cool section about the mental abacus in Here's Looking at Euclid, by the way. We always did the RS style abacus, though I can use an Asian one. But in the end we settled on the C-rods. And thus my C-rod obsession was born.

Lol. Yes, the soroban is a Japanese abacus. It is the other math system that worked well for dd. Essentially, every math thing that has clicked with her, has involved a learning curve for me. Do you think it is a stalling tactic?

farrarwilliams
12-21-2013, 11:53 PM
I never think kids stall before learning. I always think I've just been wasting my time and if only I had known they would developmentally just get it eventually then I would have been a lot better off.

Solong
12-22-2013, 12:39 AM
Pshaw. Every mom should examine 14 different ways of learning fractions.

Fun pinterest pages of waldorf math:

waldorf math (http://www.pinterest.com/queenslace/waldorf-math/)
Waldorf Steiner Class 4 ~ Math (http://www.pinterest.com/erinncate/waldorf-steiner-class-4-math/)

Off to google Here's Looking At Euclid, now that the kiddos are tucked away.

ETA: Dang. You cost me too much money on amazon, Farrar.

lavender
07-18-2015, 04:16 PM
I really enjoy Waldorf math and language arts, as for science ,history and the core philosophies well........
For my oldest and as of late little one, the story telling format and manipulative just click. i've experimented with standard and Montessori methods but the situational based math illustrated the purpose and method of any given math problem perfectly. Essentially your turning any math concept (fraction, multiplication, place value, you name it) into a story problem before moving on to just numbers. I'm looking into buying the book Math Lessons for the Elementary Grades (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1888365498?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=ox_sc_act_title_1&smid=A3ADN03F2ABAVW) right now. but their are many resources for non waldorf interactive math. I really like the Family Math (Equals Series) (http://www.amazon.com/Family-Math-Equals-Jean-Stenmark/dp/0912511060/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1437250251&sr=1-1&keywords=family+math) and Peggy Kaye's Games For Math (http://www.amazon.com/Games-Math-Playful-Child-Kindergarten/dp/0394755103/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1437250332&sr=1-1&keywords=games+for+math)

i would be really curious to hear from anyones experience teaching Waldorf math in the older grades?