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Solong
12-01-2013, 01:09 PM
Any ideas for a nine year old obsessed with syllabics? We are translating words into Dakelh syllabics (even though it is a European invention that was only used for 40 years - 1885 to 1925). She is using braille supplies to translate things into braille. She's redoing the 'Can You Count In Greek' work book. She wants more of this kind of stuff.

?? It doesn't seem to be any particular language she is obsessed with, so much as the act of translating or decoding. ??

Any and all suggestions are much appreciated. Thanks!

dbmamaz
12-01-2013, 02:25 PM
wow, a little linguist, how cool! No ideas, though.

Solong
12-01-2013, 09:52 PM
wow, a little linguist, how cool! No ideas, though.

Exactly. Me too :confused: The frustrating part of project-based is when they pick something that the parent/facilitator is clueless on. I thought... code breaking? cryptology? No, it has to be something 'real'... whatever that means. I've come up with sign language or morse code. That's all I've got.

I'm gonna buy a book printed in braille. That should keep her busy while I think.

ejsmom
12-01-2013, 10:59 PM
This may not fit the bill, but what about things like cuneiform and/or the characters of Chinese writing? I had googled "symbols of ancient languages" once upon a time when my son was into cuneiform and found all kinds of interesting stuff I knew nothing about. Maybe exploring some of that type of thing may tide her over for a bit? I feel for you as far as finding material, but it is a unique and pretty cool interest!

fastweedpuller
12-02-2013, 09:47 AM
Well, if she is not particular about what she's translating, I second the idea of studying cuneiform, or even Egyptian hieroglyphs. When we studied the Vikings last year my daughter went a little nutty studying/translating things into runes. PBS/NOVA has an episode on a Viking sword that rock hound/metallurgic-minded kids might like and it has an interactive website where you can find out the meanings of the individual symbols of the runes themselves (the sword had a runic hallmark on it, thus the link). Here is the link for that: NOVA | Write Your Name in Runes (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/ancient/write-your-name-in-runes.html)

It got her to come up with her own glyphs, which actually underscored phonics for her...a good thing considering how hard phonics was for her to master! I am hoping we'll get lots more in depth with her when we come back to studying the ancients in 2 years. But she seemed REALLY intrigued when I told her people sometimes use shorthand when they take notes in lectures...

BakedAk
12-02-2013, 11:18 AM
She might have fun with this: International Phonetic Alphabet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Phonetic_Alphabet). Once she gets the notations down, she'd be able to transcribe anything she heard.

BTW - at first, I read "Dakelh" as "Dalek." I'm such a geek. (How would one transliterate "Destroy! Destroy!"?)

Solong
12-02-2013, 03:34 PM
Yes! Great suggestions, thank you! This gives me things to start googling and offering. Fastweedpuller, I'm adding runes to her stocking this year, thanks to you. I loved runes as a kid, why couldn't I think of that on my own?? Anyway, I didn't have to :)