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murphs_mom
11-24-2013, 01:42 PM
I do grade DD's stuff, but I'm really bad about keeping up with it. Once again, I'm sitting here with a backlog (embarrassed to admit that it hasn't been done since June-ish), and I'm frantically trying to get it all caught up before the holidays start. The BoE will be sending out the review notices soon. I really don't want to be in the crunch I was last time. Sooo, I got curious about how many HSers bother with formal grading (ya know, using the red pen, calculating the % correct, reviewing what was done incorrectly, etc.). If you do it, how do you grade?

rebjc
11-24-2013, 03:04 PM
For math problems, we go over each missed problem. For writing assignments, I might point out an error or two but not more than that because my first grader starts to feel overwhelmed. Same with reading, I only point out a small number of errors if any at all. I thought that the quizzes in the Reading Eggs Skills Bank would discourage my daughter, but in fact they have motivated her. If she doesn't score well she will at some point go back and do a lesson over and retake a quiz to get a better score. She is really proud of herself when she gets a perfect score on a quiz. I don't keep letter grades or scores for subjects at all but we have very young kids. As we approach middle school age it might change.

farrarwilliams
11-24-2013, 03:39 PM
Okay, so I've taught in public school where I had to give grades and then in a private school where we did evaluations and portfolios instead and now in homeschool, obviously.

The point of the grades and the evals just don't apply to us, so I don't do them. I used to have to do them for parents, for accountability... But in homeschooling, *I* am the parent and *I* take care of the accountability - there's no one but me. So I don't feel the need to do them. Also, in both the school settings, you could potentially fail the class. Part of the grading was so that kids knew where they stood. Again, that doesn't apply here. We work to mastery or we just keep working on skills. No need to say if it's "good enough" or not, you know?

So the only thing is that kids need feedback, so I do that. We check math problems as they're done. We either choose not to evaluate a writing assignment because it's purely about process or we work on it until it's a polished, finished "A level" product. That stuff is important, but unlike in school where a teacher has to do it over time, we just do it on the fly as things happen.

For a larger sense of "how are we doing" we do a portfolio assessment. I do believe in assessment, but the way that grades provide such a flat assessment isn't for us. We might want to use them later for high school for transcripts, but even then I'm not so sure.

BakedAk
11-24-2013, 05:12 PM
What Farrah said, though she's probably more organized about it than I am. Girl would like grades - she'd like the A (though she'd not like it if I gave her a B on something); Boy would say, "a C? Ok. Can I go play now?" We just fix things as they come up. Might do grades later, for hs.

AddlepatedMonkeyMama
11-24-2013, 06:10 PM
I think giving grades and pointing out errors are two different things. I make my kids correct errors, but the only thing I "grade" are quarterly spelling tests (which I write as "18/20," for example). At the elementary level, I think grades are irrelevant. It's not like I need to send myself or my husband a report card.

farrarwilliams
11-24-2013, 06:41 PM
What Farrah said, though she's probably more organized about it than I am. Girl would like grades - she'd like the A (though she'd not like it if I gave her a B on something); Boy would say, "a C? Ok. Can I go play now?" We just fix things as they come up. Might do grades later, for hs.

Nah. I'm just good at sounding like I'm organized. ;)

BalletBoy wanted grades the other day. "How good am I at this? Out of 100?" Oh boy. We're resisting. I think it's fair to get feedback, but I don't want him to get that simple answer and move on.

murphs_mom
11-25-2013, 01:50 AM
Clarification: by "grading", I'm talking about indicating what is correct or incorrect on a page. Not sending out a letter on a report card. :)

DD wants to know how she's doing. Period. She isn't content with "you did fine" or "it's okay". She wants hard numbers. DH and I also want to know how she's doing, so I go through and check everything. It's for us as much as it's for her. TBH, she self teaches almost 95% of the time. She pulls out the book or paper, reads the directions/explanations, and completes the page as directed. I teach very little. I'm mainly here for when she's stuck on something and that just doesn't happen too often. Hence my laziness with grading/checking work.

The other big reasons I do it are for the review process, and in case she has to ship off to B&M school at some point. When we've had our HS reviews, the person doing the review has commented on the marks listed at the top of the page (most of the time it's either 100% or AMM's #right/#possible). They want to see that a parent is checking work and going over errors w/the kids. We do it to stay out of the BoE's doghouse. Whether it be middle school, high school, or college, this kid is going to be tossed into a environment where feedback happens. Even in the workplace (annual reviews). I want her to take it in stride and not get wigged out when someone tells her she screwed up 3 times out of 50. Two of our favorite mantras are "nobody's perfect" and "everyone makes mistakes".

As for assessments, those are things that I see as being kinda pointless. If girl is doing the work on her own 95% of the time, I see that as an assessment in and of itself. It would be different if I was hand-holding her the entire time. If she can do the workbook on her own, and she can complete random worksheets that I throw at her, and she does it with a near perfect score, what's the point of a separate assessment? They've asked if we do assessments when doing the BoE drill, and I tell them the truth: not really. If there's one in the workbook, she does it. If not, I don't worry about it. If I'm going to worry about whether or not she can perform well on a test, how does that make me any different than the school system I abhor?

Starkspack
11-25-2013, 07:12 AM
Once we were wrapping up several chapters of Math Mammoth and there are little tests at the end of the chapter. On a whim, I asked DD if she wanted me to grade her test. I then had to explain what grading was all about, and what A through F meant. Talk about lighting a fire. That kid became obsessed with getting A+ on every one. I stopped grading after about 3 of them and let that subject just die out. Periodically, she asks if she got an A on something, and I tell her it doesn't really matter, that grading isn't necessary. I just threw it out there and she latched right onto the idea. I wish I hadn't at this juncture, honestly. That can come later. But it was a little bit funny how immediately grade-oriented she was. Takes after her mama, I guess. ;)

quabbin
11-25-2013, 10:41 AM
I correct errors, but have no plans to grade work until middle school.

I do write report cards, however--just narrative commentary on his progress--in lieu of trying to keep old papers on hand.

JenWrites
11-25-2013, 02:36 PM
I don't grade. I just go over her independent work with her and we correct any errors or chat about how/why she came to particular conclusions. But there is no grade book or anything. It just didn't feel like a good fit for us.

leakyowl
11-25-2013, 02:43 PM
I wouldn't even know how to grade some of his work--oral assignments, projects, etc. We work on quite a bit together, so with that, I know if he gets it or not. And then some work he begs me to grade. Math tests? Grammar? He wants those graded. Science and history, not so much.

ejsmom
11-26-2013, 12:29 AM
I do not give a grade letter or percent right on anything, but if he makes an error we discuss it and he corrects (like in math, for example). We do a lot of work orally, as he had a vision issue. I don't feel like there is anything to grade - he either gets it, or not. And if not, we can review, but it's not like he's only going to be exposed to everything once in his lifetime. Most of it is reviewed (writing/grammar/math) and science and history sort of circle back and go deeper so there is review there. Also, if there is something he just doesn't get, no matter how hard we try, well, then, so what? I failed chemistry in college twice, and changed my whole career course because of it. I took chemistry again in my late 30's for a career change and at that time, for that purpose, it suddenly made sense.

I really tend to award effort because I have a very highly perfectionistic kid who often hates to try for fear of failing. So we award stickers for effort. I even make a big deal out of stuff he gets wrong, like "oh awesome, here's a learning opportunity!"

If my kid does do a math worksheet and gets them all right, HE grabs a big fat red pen and writes a huge ass A+ on it. He's never been in a regular school, so not sure where he gets this stuff. He also raises his hand to ask me questions - ??

zcat
11-26-2013, 11:21 AM
No grades on daily work.
I do mark errors and dd gets to figure out why they are wrong and fix them. We discuss her work. She does it until she understands. I can't put a grade on that.

At the end of the "year" we do review dd's progress. We can see how much progress she has made through her work by comparing to the beginning of the year or the previous year. I don't feel grades give a good picture of what dd can do.

bcnlvr
11-26-2013, 11:46 AM
My bestie's dd did Montessori K-8. No tests. No grades. Her dd was accepted into Academic Magnet High (top 10 HS in the country), graduated, and is now going to WVU on a full-ride. I think grades are as relevant as one makes them.

I don't do grades. We are mastery-based....so it would be all As on a report card. In fact, when enrolling ds12 into the charter school, they wanted grades, so I made a transcript. All As. I also gave them years-worth of ITBS scores as well as ACT-Explore and DOMA scores. We placed him by the test scores.

Grades, schmades.

murphs_mom
11-26-2013, 12:06 PM
Again, not talking report cards. Talking grading...aka 'scoring'. The # correct out of the # possible. NOT a report card or letter grade.

ikslo
11-26-2013, 12:27 PM
Nope. We do corrections, not scoring. I want to make sure DS understands the material. If that means we spend the whole hour discussing how to achieve the correct answer to the very first math question, so be it. If he writes something that is misspelled or grammatically incorrect, I say something silly to prompt him to check for errors. "Oh, joe would be really upset to know you don't think of him as his own specific person." Then he says, "Sorry, Joe!" as he corrects with the needed capitalization. - or - He read a bok? How did he do that? Maybe you should look again! (taught him when you look at something, you do so with your 2 eyes, which are the 2 o's in look, so that sound is often a double o.) Or I use discussion starters like, "How did you come up with that answer? How can we verify it?"

Agree with bcnlvr: Grades, schmades!

farrarwilliams
11-26-2013, 03:30 PM
If you mean just checking a paper for errors, I think with many subjects - math in particular - not doing so in some way - whether it results in a "grade" or not - is a huge disservice to a child. If you don't do this, then kids can do problems completely wrong for days or weeks or more and not know. I should think all of us check our kids' work on some level.

hockeymom
11-26-2013, 04:02 PM
If my kid does do a math worksheet and gets them all right, HE grabs a big fat red pen and writes a huge ass A+ on it. He's never been in a regular school, so not sure where he gets this stuff. He also raises his hand to ask me questions - ??

From A Christmas Story? We love that scene, and definitely have fun with it in our homeschool! :)

murphs_mom
11-26-2013, 04:04 PM
-child finishes paper/assignment/exam/dissertation
-you pick up document
-using a writing implement of a contrasting color, you indicate in some manner those items which are incorrect, incomplete, or flawed in some manner
-once the entire document is read through, you count up the number of 'missed' questions or errors
-you determine the total number of questions or points possible
-at the top of the page, using said implement of contrasting color, you write a score of some sort: the number right over the number possible, a percentage score, or even a letter grade if that's what inflates your whoopee cushion
-you hand the document back to the offspring and allow them to reflect upon the errors OR to take glorious, profound joy in their perfect score
-**optional step: you have the offspring determine why their answers were incorrect and then repair the answer (but this does not alter their initial score)

When I walked the 24mi to school with the Ingall's girls (I liked Mary, and tolerated Laura) through the 8' of snow every day of the school year, my teacher (lovely woman who was born in a cave somewhere in WV and taught by monks who'd taken a vow of silence) called this procedure g-r-a-d-i-n-g. In the fancier cities and in more modern times, this may be referred to as something else. I apologize that my backwoods education has led to confusion.

hockeymom
11-26-2013, 04:08 PM
If you mean just checking a paper for errors, I think with many subjects - math in particular - not doing so in some way - whether it results in a "grade" or not - is a huge disservice to a child. If you don't do this, then kids can do problems completely wrong for days or weeks or more and not know. I should think all of us check our kids' work on some level.

Definitely. I think back on years of red marks all over my math homework, but no one to tell me WHAT I did wrong or HOW to correct it. You turn it in, it comes back incorrect, and you just move on.

I love the learning opportunities that arise all day long in homeschooling. Dictation sentences aren't just for spelling words, corrections and explanations for grammar and punctuation are natural fits when reviewing the work even though they may have nothing to do directly with the lesson. Same with any subject. Grades may not mean much at home, but comprehension and actual mastery sure do. PS just can't do that.

hockeymom
11-26-2013, 04:23 PM
-child finishes paper/assignment/exam/dissertation
-you pick up document
-using a writing implement of a contrasting color, you indicate in some manner those items which are incorrect, incomplete, or flawed in some manner
-once the entire document is read through, you count up the number of 'missed' questions or errors
-you determine the total number of questions or points possible
-at the top of the page, using said implement of contrasting color, you write a score of some sort: the number right over the number possible, a percentage score, or even a letter grade if that's what inflates your whoopee cushion
-you hand the document back to the offspring and allow them to reflect upon the errors OR to take glorious, profound joy in their perfect score
-**optional step: you have the offspring determine why their answers were incorrect and then repair the answer (but this does not alter their initial score)

When I walked the 24mi to school with the Ingall's girls (I liked Mary, and tolerated Laura) through the 8' of snow every day of the school year, my teacher (lovely woman who was born in a cave somewhere in WV and taught by monks who'd taken a vow of silence) called this procedure g-r-a-d-i-n-g. In the fancier cities and in more modern times, this may be referred to as something else. I apologize that my backwoods education has led to confusion.

I sense you aren't getting the answer you're looking for, Carolyn? It doesn't seem to me that many of us here run our home schools that way. I sure don't; for us it's more organic than that I guess. But if it works for you, great! But I'm not sure we are confused by your question! :)

inmom
11-26-2013, 04:39 PM
I only would point out errors, mostly in spelling & grammar in writing and in math problems, and not really assign grades when they were pre-high school.

For high school I assign grades. However, it can be as simple as letter grades based on percentages on tests/homework/labs to letter grades based on mastery or letter grades based on a pre-determined rubric. From what I have found researching the high school years and college admissions, as long as the transcript states HOW the grades were determined, admissions officers are satisfied.

DragonFaerie
11-26-2013, 06:08 PM
I do keep grades. My son wants to know what his grade is. He wants a report card. So I do it. But I don't grade everything. Regular daily work doesn't get a grade. I mark errors; he goes back and fixes errors. If he doesn't understand errors, we discuss and review. He does have tests in grammar, math, and geography that are graded and count on his report card. He writes papers for science and history that are graded. He loses points for misspelled words and grammatical errors (that he should know) and for incomplete ideas or missing information. He gets extra points for neatness and/or writing in cursive and including pictures or visuals with his paper. If he is particularly sloppy and gets a poor grade, he has the option of re-doing the paper to try for a better grade. Every 9 weeks, he gets a report card that he then shows his dad and grandparents. He is very, very proud when he gets all As. :-)

Avalon
11-26-2013, 07:10 PM
I point out errors and make suggestions for improvement, but I have never given a "grade" before and don't intend to.

farrarwilliams
11-26-2013, 08:00 PM
Carolyn, I think I'm still confused. To me, there are two or three different things going on in your description...

Do I use a contrasting color to check work?
Sometimes, if it seems to make sense, but sometimes I just use a pencil. It doesn't really matter as the child is right there.

Do I put X's and check's by everything?
No, because again, the point is the feedback, not the rights and wrongs.

Do I write a score at the top?
No, but I do occasionally write "Wow" or "Great" or draw a smiley face because it makes the kids feel good.

Do I hand it back?
No, it never left the kid in the first place as I never check a paper without the kid right there.

To me, "grading" is assigning a numerical or letter grade through some process. It usually includes checking over work the way you're describing because there has to be a basis or justification for the grade and the assignments are the data points to get that. But it can also include things like participation grades and can score for simply doing work instead of for doing it right (many teachers score daily homework that way - that the answers don't matter, just that it was completed).

murphs_mom
11-26-2013, 08:39 PM
I'm done. Horse is dead. Peace out.

zcat
11-27-2013, 05:05 PM
Dd finishes assigned work. I look at it immediately.
-using a writing implement of a contrasting color, you indicate in some manner those items which are incorrect, incomplete, or flawed in some manner Yes, doesn't have to be a different color...I'm lucky I can find a pen that works...I don't know where they all go. Sigh.
-once the entire document is read through, you count up the number of 'missed' questions or errors No to tallying the number of errors. I might remark if dd made a lot of areas and we would discuss why (carelessness, not understanding, etc)
-you determine the total number of questions or points possible Nope
-at the top of the page, using said implement of contrasting color, you write a score of some sort: the number right over the number possible, a percentage score, or even a letter grade if that's what inflates your whoopee cushion No grades on daily work
-you hand the document back to the offspring and allow them to reflect upon the errors Yes & fix them right away. Dd does not get to walk away from mistakes just because she got most of an assignment right.

I would grade a quiz/test and tally points or percentages but not daily assignments. We would discuss errors but dd would not get her score changed. I don't really do much testing though as I have a good idea what dd knows without testing her. I also do not do report cards.

KittyP
11-28-2013, 11:25 AM
Well, his online program doesn't grade but it does make him get it right before he can move on. When we do stuff that's about the way it goes too. We just keep going over it until he gets it consistently right and move on, but no grades. I know Hubby is the type who will want grades so I might make some up for him when Kiddo is older, but he's doing well with the current system so who knows.

crunchynerd
12-02-2013, 04:34 PM
Issuing actual grades seems as sensible when home educating, as taking roll call and issuing bathroom passes. I don't get it. But I do get learning from mistakes, and finding out where areas of strength and weakness are, and focusing on how to resolve weaknesses and build on strengths. But actually marking a paper with a letter grade or percentage? The only time I ever did that was when DD wanted me to because she went through a phase of wanting everything to be like school, because at the time all her friends were school kids, and she was at the age where they want to be just like everyone else.
She got over that REALLY quickly when she discovered she didn't really like seeing a lot of red on her work, and unflattering grades occasionally! Not doing things that way is far better for progress, because it doesn't make her fear risk, or shy away from trying to figure something out if she's not sure of the answer. Grades and the stick/carrot can make a kid fear taking any risks, and stick within comfort zones, which has a dulling effect on their efforts, in my limited experience.

BASHHomeschool
04-15-2014, 04:36 PM
I grade and keep track of grades. However, there are lots of activities we do that are not for a grade. We do occasional tests, too. Most things we do for a grade are reinforcement of a previous lesson to keep track of where they are and if we need to go over something again. If they get something wrong, they correct it. When writing, they go through drafts with corrections/suggestions until they are ready to turn in a final draft. My kids like seeing where they are and love to get "straight A's"

aspiecat
04-22-2014, 04:42 PM
I was caught between the first and second choices, as I do grade DS's work, but not everything, and it depends on whether or not I believe it requires grading, checking, or just a quick look-over. One subject is graded externally, as it's a subscribed, five-week IT thingo, another two come with tests for each chapter (Math & ASL), and the rest I simply choose which activities best reflect a test of certain concepts, and use those as a marker of how he is going.

DS wants to do some community college when he turns 16 in just over a year, so he is deliberately loading up on Math, Science and IT (he wants to do some programming at comm. college), and just going at a "normal" pace through the Arts (English, Foreign Language, Music, History, Geography). So a fair amount of grading is required for him, but I am not worrying too much about how "official" it appears.

crunchynerd
04-25-2014, 09:37 AM
My daughter is currently learning to work independently out of textbooks, one subject per day of the week, both so she can learn independent study skills and the nuts-n-bolts of things like putting headers on papers, titling them, referencing page numbers, doing numbered problems from a book, in a notebook, and working from a text without help. This is not because I think textbooks are the very best way to learn, necessarily, but because I needed a way for her to continue her learning even without constant feedback or input from someone else (me) and also because it is good to know how to put headers on papers and work from textbooks into notebooks, in case she wants to go to high school or college.

So, because she's now doing textbook work, the issue of how well she learned the concepts in the section or chapter (usually by answering questions at the end of the section) comes up, and that's where grading comes in.

At first my daughter wanted me to give percentage scores and letter grades on her spelling and vocabulary work, but tired of that quickly. Her point here is not to never make a mistake, or get all A's (after all, if she did, it would mean that we weren't working at a level that actually challenged her!), but to strive at her level of difficulty, and improve through effort.

We stopped doing percentages and letter grades because the glamour of that wore thin really fast, but focused instead on having her summarize and talk about the concepts being learned, discuss problems, ambiguities, inconsistencies, etc and seek to resolve them (sometimes the book oversimplifies things and that's our chance to delve more deeply), and when we identify problems in learning or understanding, finding out why something was wrong is often better than just being told what is right, and having that pasted over the error.

But number grades quickly got tiresome, because she feels they are like that "Time 4" that we tried, and she finds being cheered for getting it right, and booed for getting it wrong, demotivating, either way, as if her primary goal in life is to be approved of and applauded, and if she is human, makes mistakes, or doesn't earn applause, that she has failed. That's the unpleasant underside of grades...they aren't just indicators. They alter motivation, swaying it away from learning, and toward the scoring of points.

If each student could ideally be met at his or her level of genuine effort, and you could use letter grades to measure that effort and success, ideally, all students would be C students, and have the chance to take any C work, and spend time learning it more deeply, seeing what their struggles were, resolving them, and eventually coming out with A work on that topic before moving on.

The goal of getting it all right, all the time, sets people up for shying away from any true challenges, and conditions them to see getting approval as the real goal, rather than seeking challenge and enjoying the thrill of meeting a challenge, struggling, and eventually mastering it.


But if I didn't turn this into way more philosophy than is required, I'd probably be someone else. :blush:

redww6
08-09-2014, 08:51 AM
I don't grade, I do however keep track of all there progress & what they maybe lacking in. I merely correct course with there schooling. My kids work so hard & it really sucks when you don't measure up to standard testing. My kids our standard there unique & there smart. that's all they need to be graded on.

Merry
08-09-2014, 09:36 AM
I feel like I am way too busy and disorganized to assign grades to them. I'm happy if I review most (all of math) of their work with them every day. I mistakenly had written percentages at one point on their MM worksheets; my girls would cry if they got one percentage point lower than the other. Now when I review their work and they ask how other did, I just say "about the same as you."

High school is different though but I wish it didn't have to be. I feel like if I'm involved with what my kids is learning, I still have a good idea if they are grasping the material or need further teaching /review. My 15 year old this year is starting homeschooling and a local private school will allow him to participate in sports with them. They are requesting his grades weekly to know if he is eligible to play. I'm meeting with the principal next week and I'm hoping that "pass" will be enough for them. I will give him grades for his transcript but I am hoping just to give him one at the end of each semester. That doesn't mean he won't be getting lots of feedback along the way.

My daughter is entering her 3rd year of college and they are still asking for a Spanish grade for her that I never sent them (or they will make her take an extra semester of foreign language). "Pass" is not good enough for them, but might be for other schools. Assigning grades was really hard for me to do for her in high school and I am hoping to be a bit more prepared for my son.

crunchynerd
08-13-2014, 04:53 PM
I just don't get why grading is at all beneficial outside the artificial school environment, except as an ego-booster or ego-buster. My daughter wanted to try it once, and it was not long before she realized that being essentially cheered for getting answers right, and booed for getting them wrong, was making her less willing to take chances, stretch, or think, because either we had to stick to the kind of shallow "learning" that is able to be distilled down to a binary system of ones and zeros, of right and wrong answers (avoiding deep thoughts and explorations) and therefore it becomes very cookbook stuff dependent entirely on a quantifiable outcome, or else admit that any other kind of grading system, is completely arbitrary and unfair.

But whatever, the end result was a pressure to get the certain grade, and to teach in a narrow, confining way that ensured fair grading was possible, that brought in all the problems inherent in schools, and threw out the window, most of the joy of learning, that can be a part of what makes homeschooling so desirable.

Yes, in doing arithmetic calculations, it's easy to distill things to a yes/no, right/wrong point system. But that does not teach mathematical thinking, or reasoning, and actively discourages open logical exploration and debate. Yes, with spelling, it's easy to distill it down to the same binary point system for grading. But beyond that, cutting literary appreciation, levels of increasing sophistication and confidence in writing, etc. in to bits and pieces such that a points-system rubric works, really leaves entire subjects in tatters, and seriously blurs the reason for pursuing them.

So we don't. She knows, and so do I, where she's having a hard time mastering something, and where she's improving by great leaps, without the need for all that, because she's not a number or a face in a crowd, to me, and I don't have to justify applying more focus on areas where she's having trouble, with numbers on a spreadsheet.

However, if she wants to know where she stands in comparison to others, it's easy enough to get workbooks and test prep books sorted according to grade, and let her do a few practice tests and see how those come out graded. I would like her to have a good chance at being a National Merit Semifinalist based on PSAT scores (I was one despite terrible grades) if the National Merit Scholarship would seem like a reasonable thing to shoot for to further her future plans, at that point. And that does mean, learning the system when it comes to grades, points, and standardized tests. But we're not letting that be how we learn, in general. Learning the system is a course unto itself, and can come in time.

That said, I'm really glad my umbrella school prepares transcripts and issues diplomas, and I'll be finding out what their requirements are, and doing more research into grades vs. test scores for the purposes of pursuing degree options for homeschoolers, in a few short years. It seems laughable to me, really, because I could assign her straight A's, but what does that amount to?

homegirl
08-14-2014, 02:54 AM
We don't do letter grades. DD7 doesn't know they exist yet. For math, we've started writing the number of correct problems over the number of possible problems because we've been doing fractions and it is a fun way to get in a little more practice. Sometimes, I'll put a sticker on something. Or she'll choose a sticker and put it on something she is especially proud of. We keep track of which days we do our school stuff. We put stickers on the calendar squares for those days. It is kind of like grading and attendance taking in the sense that she is proud of how many stickers are on a page, and has proof that she is accomplishing something.

laundrycrisis
08-14-2014, 07:16 AM
DS1 uses Calvert. They have online multiple-choice checkpoints that are immediately graded after he submits them, so he gets the experience of having his answers graded that way. He tries hard to get perfect scores on them and when he misses one, he digs in to figure out why it was wrong.

Pandorica
08-20-2014, 05:13 PM
I don't believe grading worksheets is necessary since to me that is a tool to judge how he is doing. It lets me see what we need to work on more and where his weak spots are.

For report card purposes and for his own enjoyment I do grade quizzes and tests. We won't however take a test or quiz unless he is properly ready (by knowing the material, not coaching it) so I feel that is all that is needed in the end :)

panama10
08-20-2014, 05:23 PM
so we just started homeschooling last year and I didn't give grades. And I don't think my kids took it very seriously. I know they didn't.

This year, I'm giving them "grades". You know, a number and a letter. So far, they are taking their work a lot more serious. Didn't get a good grade? then you get to do the work again until you get a perfect grade. In theory everyone should have 100s because you are gonna have to redo it.

I guess since they are used to having "grades" that gets their attention. We are also putting together a portfolio because that's what matters in the end. But my kids seem to need grades to gauge how they are doing.

jess
08-20-2014, 06:22 PM
I go over the work and make them do corrections if there are excessive careless mistakes, or reteach it if it is clear they didn't understand, but I don't assign a grade. I'll probably start doing something with actual grades if/when it becomes clear that they'll be going somewhere where grades are assigned within the next year.

Aroura
10-05-2014, 12:38 PM
I go over math and other math things, like time and money and have her correct her mistakes, but I don't grade exactly, just help her correct. After talking with you ladies and gents, I have decided not to heavily correct her writing, only very simple words and the occasional backwards letter, for now. In a year or 2, I will start working harder with her on correcting spelling.
I expect I will give her graded tests one a month or every other month, but she won't see the grade, it will be for me to assess how she is doing so I know if we need to adjust things.

Since she is still little and I am basically working with her 95% of the time, you would think I would know where she is in a subject. But working with her I give her prompts and reminders. A test will let me see what she has really mastered and can move past.

As she gets older, I do expect I will correct more, perhaps even start doing some traditional grading, but not for years.

Of course since I am new to this and still learning about teaching and learning, it is all subject to change.

laurelsstitchery
11-16-2014, 04:35 PM
My DD is only in first grade, but I do some grading. I'm only keeping track of her math work, but I wanted to do it mostly to try out the grading function of the online homeschool tracking software we're using. I grade each sheet immediately after she completes them and we review any missed problems right then. She has to redo the ones she got wrong. :)