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View Full Version : Seven reasons not to send your kid to college



mjzzyzoff
08-04-2010, 12:54 PM
http://tinyurl.com/2cou97m

wild_destiny
08-04-2010, 02:03 PM
Thanks for sharing this!

StartingOver
08-04-2010, 02:20 PM
I totally agree !!!

My older children have gone on to college but I am not paying for it. My sons attend college paid for by military service, and will get more funding when they are out of school. All of my children are in health fields, so college is required. My daughter has gotten fully funded by grants, because she is a single mother. I told them when they were young that they could be anything they wanted to be, if they worked for it. I love the way my young adults have taken responsibility for their own lives.

mjzzyzoff
08-04-2010, 03:04 PM
That's awesome Jana! I always think back to my college experience, and the amount of debt I still have from it, and wish I had waited until I were older and wiser before wasting all that money. I would have much preferred traveling or starting a business with it. At this point I've considered taking some college classes just to learn what they have to teach, not seeking a degree, but alas the scheduling seems out of reach for now. You can bet if I do take some classes I actually have to "pay" for myself, I will take it more seriously!

I did get a decent education in partying however... :/

StartingOver
08-04-2010, 03:20 PM
That's awesome Jana! I always think back to my college experience, and the amount of debt I still have from it, and wish I had waited until I were older and wiser before wasting all that money. I would have much preferred traveling or starting a business with it. At this point I've considered taking some college classes just to learn what they have to teach, not seeking a degree, but alas the scheduling seems out of reach for now. You can bet if I do take some classes I actually have to "pay" for myself, I will take it more seriously!

I did get a decent education in partying however... :/

I am sure some day I will get around to some college classes. I have just never had the time. Emma will graduate when I am 57...... maybe then. hehe.

mjzzyzoff
08-04-2010, 03:29 PM
I am sure some day I will get around to some college classes. I have just never had the time. Emma will graduate when I am 57...... maybe then. hehe.

Hey, my mom went back to college when she was in her 50's and she is now an accountant. She actually has a degree from the first go round, but it is a degree in Jewish Studies, which is a rather odd thing to have a degree in, especially if you're not Jewish. She's never used it for anything, but always said she would make either a great hostage or great translator! Oh, the choices we make when we're young...

StartingOver
08-04-2010, 04:34 PM
Oh, the choices we make when we're young...

This is the exact reason I don't allow my children to have a lot of choices when homeschooling, at least not with the basics. They have no choice but to study 4 years of math, science, history, writing, foreign language, & etc. They can decide in which order, and have some input into the curriculum we use. But it is my job to make sure they are ready for the world.

In my homeschool the kids graduate un-officially at 16, and must do the following till they are 18, or leave home. For at least one year they are required to take college classes before they graduate, to do volunteer work, to do job sampling, & etc. I want them to have a real picture of life out there, the good and the bad.

Shoe
08-05-2010, 01:14 AM
Very interesting article.

hockeymom
08-05-2010, 08:02 AM
Try telling that to my seven year old. He already has his heart set on earning an industrial design degree from MIT. He knows--and has since he was 4--exactly what he wants to do for a career and is extremely detailed in how he plans to achieve his goals. Despite the generosity of grandparents, we are definitely hoping for a major scholarship! :)

farrarwilliams
08-05-2010, 08:39 AM
But if he still has that clear goal as a teenager, then that's a great reason TO go to college. I think too often it's just what you do. It's part of a conveyor belt of education that even smart kids don't know how to get off of and it doesn't really go anywhere. It's crazy and, as that article points out, it's expensive too. On the other hand, if you have a specific goal for college, then that's great.

hockeymom
08-05-2010, 09:43 AM
I totally agree that college isn't always the way to go, or that it's for everyone. I went to university because I was expected to, there was never any question that I'd go, even though I had no idea what I wanted to study. My dad chose (!) a major for me but it was one I had absolutely no interest in and doesn't suit me at all. Needless to say, I didn't finish.

It's crazy to me that DS knows (or thinks very seriously that he knows) what he wants to do with his future; I always figured kids like that were just being heavily influenced by their parents and were parroting information or ideas. Now I know better! LOL. So yeah, if it's still what he wants as he gets to be older, I figure it's my responsibility to help him attain that goal. Until then it's my responsibility to respect his plans and interests while helping become a well rounded person, able to take on his world as he sees fit.

wild_destiny
08-05-2010, 12:59 PM
Your son is lucky to have you for a mom, Hockeymom!

Theresa Holland Ryder
08-05-2010, 02:31 PM
It's crazy to me that DS knows (or thinks very seriously that he knows) what he wants to do with his future; I always figured kids like that were just being heavily influenced by their parents and were parroting information or ideas. Now I know better! LOL. So yeah, if it's still what he wants as he gets to be older, I figure it's my responsibility to help him attain that goal. Until then it's my responsibility to respect his plans and interests while helping become a well rounded person, able to take on his world as he sees fit.

That's awesome. I'm so glad you support your kids' dreams. From the time I was in second grade, I wanted with all my being to be an Astronomer. I won't bore you with the details, but I didn't become an Astronomer because I didn't have the support I needed at home or public school. I do a fab Astronomy home school unit though! :)

Your son is truly blessed to have you.

InstinctiveMom
08-14-2010, 07:54 PM
I totally agree that college isn't always the way to go, or that it's for everyone. <snip> So yeah, if it's still what he wants as he gets to be older, I figure it's my responsibility to help him attain that goal. Until then it's my responsibility to respect his plans and interests while helping become a well rounded person, able to take on his world as he sees fit.

Excellent! I hope he one day appreciates how awesome his mama is, lol.
~h

elkhollow
08-14-2010, 10:44 PM
If you're interested in this subject you might want to watch Declining By Degrees. It's a PBS documentary on the the higher education industry, what's gone wrong, how unprepared young adults still are even with a college education, why they are unprepared, and the fact that not all colleges are the same. It's available for instant view on Netflix.

InstinctiveMom
08-14-2010, 11:23 PM
I'll do that. :)

Busygoddess
08-14-2010, 11:33 PM
I won't force the kids to go to college, because I know that college isn't for everyone. However, as their mom & primary educator, it's my responsibility to make sure they're prepared for whatever they choose to do with their lives whether that's going straight into the workforce, starting their own business, doing a correspondence course or vocational school, or attending Yale. In IL, we're considered private schools, so I got to set graduation requirements. My graduation requirements are almost double what the local district requires & goes beyond any college entrance requirements I've seen (I checked various college websites, from state schools to the Ivy League). At the pace she's going, Dea will graduate around age 16, at the end of 10th grade. Even if they graduate early, they won't be allowed to go away to a 4-year university (or go out on their own in any other way) until age 18. During the time between graduation & age 18, they will either work, volunteer, attend the local Community College, do online college courses, do correspondence courses, do internships, or some combination of those. That way, they have time to figure out what they really want to do with their lives before they attend college (if they decide to attend), so they don't waste time & money at an expensive school figuring out what they want to do.
They do get a lot of say in our schooling from helping choose materials to helping plan exact topics covered in some subjects. Their interests & future plans play a role in my planning. Each child's education is completely personalized, while still providing a well-rounded education that also covers everything I feel is important for them to study. Whatever they choose to do as adults, I plan to make sure they're prepared for it.

hockeymom
08-15-2010, 06:22 AM
Wow Brandi--you have it figured out! I am impressed! :)

Shoe
08-15-2010, 10:08 AM
I won't force the kids to go to college, because I know that college isn't for everyone. However, as their mom & primary educator, it's my responsibility to make sure they're prepared for whatever they choose to do with their lives whether that's going straight into the workforce, starting their own business, doing a correspondence course or vocational school, or attending Yale. In IL, we're considered private schools, so I got to set graduation requirements. My graduation requirements are almost double what the local district requires & goes beyond any college entrance requirements I've seen (I checked various college websites, from state schools to the Ivy League). At the pace she's going, Dea will graduate around age 16, at the end of 10th grade. Even if they graduate early, they won't be allowed to go away to a 4-year university (or go out on their own in any other way) until age 18. During the time between graduation & age 18, they will either work, volunteer, attend the local Community College, do online college courses, do correspondence courses, do internships, or some combination of those. That way, they have time to figure out what they really want to do with their lives before they attend college (if they decide to attend), so they don't waste time & money at an expensive school figuring out what they want to do.
They do get a lot of say in our schooling from helping choose materials to helping plan exact topics covered in some subjects. Their interests & future plans play a role in my planning. Each child's education is completely personalized, while still providing a well-rounded education that also covers everything I feel is important for them to study. Whatever they choose to do as adults, I plan to make sure they're prepared for it.
That sounds just about perfect. I'll take that as advice for our home school planning.

Busygoddess
08-15-2010, 12:31 PM
Thanks. I'm a planner. I think Dea was in 3rd grade when I started really planning out graduation requirements. Some may think I'm a bit crazy, but I can tell you pretty much everything my kids will study each year until graduation (including what materials we'll use).

mommykicksbutt
08-15-2010, 04:21 PM
If you're crazy Brandi then you've got company! We're doing pretty much the same thing, I'm a planner not a winger. We had "high school" orientation last night where we laid out sonny's next four years, goals, expectations of courses and course work, volunteering, etc. Also when he finishes a course that has a corresponding CLEP test (such as Biology, Western Civilization, etc.) we will review for the test and he would take it to earn college credit. 77 bucks, 90 minutes, 3-6 college credit hours. After he graduates high school, he will be taking a "Gap" year to grow-up a little more and explore various occupations. Then if he chooses to finish college than he can do so. Our daughter completed her college degree doing all of her lower division course work at our local community college while living at home then transferred to university and did all of her upper division course work via computer correspondence while still living at home, so she basically homeschooled the last two years of her college degree. (we saved a bundle of money too!)