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Deli76
09-28-2013, 02:13 PM
Last week hubby had a burger. He was sick the next day. This happens to him nearly on a daily basis. He wonders why I wont touch some of the stuff he eats. Just the smell will turn my stomach. Sometimes, if I don't come home with the food he wants, he will literally go to the store and buy it. Well, after the burger he ate last week I detoxed him with raw fruit and vegies, no carbs, and fish from the natural foods store. After 3 days, he said he felt much better and has cut back significantly. I'd say by about 75%. He had a hot dog 2 days ago. lol. Anyways, I have been looking up how to make certain foods from scratch with out all the chemicals. I have a recipe for ice cream, bread, mayo, cookies, cakes, potato chips, cheese and so on. I was wondering if anyone has any recipes , either natural or raw, no chemicals, that they would like to share?

dbmamaz
09-28-2013, 02:21 PM
almost all recipes are natural as long as they dont include things like canned soups and mixes? i mean, everything i eat is all natural (and gluten free). Ok, i dont make my own mayo or potato chips. but i wouldnt know where to start?

halfpint
09-28-2013, 04:17 PM
Just slice the potatoes w/a mandoline (or a chef's knife) and deep-fry :)

You're right, anything you make at home with actual, identifiable plant or animal parts is going to be good for you. Just avoid things with compund ingredients and you'll know exactly what you're eating.

Some things are easiest when made in large batches and canned/frozen. We make tomato sauce, basil pesto, barbeque sauce, soups, and beans (lots of beans!) in big batches and store them.

We make our own fruit snacks by buying boxes of fruit at the farmers' market and drying them on a food dehydrator. We also dry tomatoes and corn this way to use in soup later in the winter. We also buy meat in bulk from the farmers, a whole or half animal at a time.

I buy bell peppers in bulk, chop them, and freeze them so they're easy to add to a meal anytime.

dbmamaz
09-28-2013, 04:34 PM
my post might not have been clear - what kind of recipes are you looking for? condiments? meals? snacks?

Accidental Homeschooler
09-28-2013, 07:05 PM
Have you read Michael Pollan's book, Food Rules? I think it is a really nice guide to eating healthily and what kinds of food to avoid.

Deli76
09-28-2013, 10:22 PM
both snacks and meals. Even how to make some of the condiments. I am familiar with dehydrating food, I have an electric dehydrator and a solar dehydrator as well. I also make juice with my juicer. My daughter and I can taste the chemicals, and get really sick afterwards. I get major migraines from red dyes. So our diet has always been limited. Hubby has been in denial, up until he got really sick from the burger. Ds is 18, he thinks his stomach is made of steel! lol But I have been clearing out the fridge and letting them finish some of the stuff that's in there. I cant wait till its all gone! And I will definitely take a look at that book! Thank you!

Crabby Lioness
10-07-2013, 03:22 PM
We make just about everything, so what do you want to know? I am severely allergic to some ingredient in processed food, so it's easier to make stuff.

But aside from fruits if I don't know what patch of ground it came from I don't eat it "raw". My steamer is my friend.

We buy grass-fed beef from a local farmer and eat it once a week. That eliminates the cravings and makes sure we get all our red-meat-related vitamins and minerals without breaking the bank or overtaxing our digestions.

Crabby Lioness
10-07-2013, 03:28 PM
America's Test Kitchen recipe for mayo: whip milk with an immersion blender until becomes the right texture and consistency to be called "mayonnaise". I haven't tried it because I don't have an immersion blender -- yet.

If you're in the states, PBS' subchannel Create has a ton of good cooking shows. I especially recommend Jacque Pepin and America's Test Kitchen. They include a lot of basics.

(Just avoid Martha Stewart. Always, no matter what she's doing.)

Crabby Lioness
10-07-2013, 10:08 PM
Some more questions before we start throwing recipes at you:

1)How much cooking have you done? Are you a newb or can we say, "Modify this in that way to get this"?

2)How much cooking are you prepared to do?

3)What do you want your family's diet to be like?

4)What do they actually like to eat?

5)How often do you eat? It's easier to control an appetite with four or five small meals than two or three big ones?

6)What tools are in your kitchen?

SimplyTheGoodLife
10-07-2013, 10:53 PM
I do as much scratch cooking as I can. I make my own bread products (bread, buns, dinner rolls, flour tortillas, etc.), ice cream, various sauces (syrups, BBQ, nacho cheese), pudding, and pizzas (along with the usual cakes, pies, cookies, etc.). I tried making my own mayonnaise once...it didn't turn out so well. We also make make most of our own meals; meaning we don't buy pre-made boxed or canned meals. If you are interested in any of my recipes, just let me know. I'd be happy to share.

meanoldmommy
10-08-2013, 08:21 PM
Mayo is super easy. Whisk a very fresh pastured egg and a dollop of mustard until mixed. Slowly drizzle while mixing a cup or a bit more oil then squeeze in half a lemon. Salt and pepper to your taste.
Ketchup is a bit more involved but still easy. Put a couple of pounds of tomatoes, a chopped onion, and garlic in a pot and cook down. When it looks like pasta sauce, add some brown sugar, cloves, s&p, worchestershire, cinnamon stick if you like. Cook down and then give it a buzz with an immersion blender. Cook it really slowly until it gets as thick as you like it.
I also like to do small changes like using applesauce in place of oil when baking and subbing ground flax and water for eggs in pancakes. Soaked dates whizzed up also subs out for sugar really well in recipes. Adding chia seeds to smoothies or summer porridge is a good trick too. Oh, and putting greens like spinach and kale in fruit smoothies.

hollyfell
10-08-2013, 09:08 PM
I just heard an interview with Jennifer Reese, author of "Make the BRead, Buy the Butter". Her book is about the most cost effective and low effort foods to make yourself. She has a focus on health but also an eye for cost. I am waiting for a copy from the library but you might want to check it out.

SimplyTheGoodLife
10-10-2013, 08:36 PM
I just heard an interview with Jennifer Reese, author of "Make the BRead, Buy the Butter". Her book is about the most cost effective and low effort foods to make yourself. She has a focus on health but also an eye for cost. I am waiting for a copy from the library but you might want to check it out.

Thanks for the tip. I just logged in to my library account and submitted a request for the book.

Ryan
02-04-2014, 06:16 PM
Just slice the potatoes w/a mandoline (or a chef's knife) and deep-fry :)

You're right, anything you make at home with actual, identifiable plant or animal parts is going to be good for you. Just avoid things with compund ingredients and you'll know exactly what you're eating.

Some things are easiest when made in large batches and canned/frozen. We make tomato sauce, basil pesto, barbeque sauce, soups, and beans (lots of beans!) in big batches and store them.

We make our own fruit snacks by buying boxes of fruit at the farmers' market and drying them on a food dehydrator. We also dry tomatoes and corn this way to use in soup later in the winter. We also buy meat in bulk from the farmers, a whole or half animal at a time.

I buy bell peppers in bulk, chop them, and freeze them so they're easy to add to a meal anytime.

YUMM animal parts, I love those things. Ive explore natural food stores and everything seems to be darn near twice as expensive. The way my family eats I'd be in the poorhouse in no time.

MrsLOLcat
02-05-2014, 10:20 AM
I make a lot of foods, but sometimes I just don't have the TIME. I always make bread, and I had been making a lot of our breakfasts but have been slacking lately (need to get back to that... we've had far too much granola and cereal lately, and the kids miss my homemade buckwheat pancakes/waffles and breakfast burritos). I rarely have time to make tortillas, though, and just suck it up and buy condiments that I can interpret the labels of (usually organic, but not always). I really want to find a local farmer and go in with someone to get half a cow and maybe a pig (not too many pig farmers around here...). We've got the deep freeze space; it's just a matter of finding the farmer. Anyway, obviously every family is going to do things their own way, but I just can't go all in when it comes to making every single thing. I do what I can and try to find the best item on the market when I buy the rest. Now if I could just get DH away from the Ramen noodles... *shudder*

BerthaCardone
08-19-2014, 04:22 AM
Doing scratch cooking is just like making something new and innovative thing in a short period of time. It is the good hands-on approach for making a daily meals. For making homemade foods, by using some fresh ingredients that delivers the original flavors is good practice. And, while making it, using a good additive such as salt is another important part of making your food delicious.