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summer94
08-29-2013, 06:11 AM
Do you ever look at all your curriculum and think "holy crap, this is a LOT, maybe too much!". But then see what others do/doing and thing "holy crap, this is NOT enough, WE NEED MORE!"

:confused:

Leanne71
08-29-2013, 06:51 AM
All the time, then reason takes over, we do what is right for us!

Gummers
08-29-2013, 07:22 AM
Yes. And I am finding the transition from prepackaged all in one curriculum to be difficult to adjust to. It sometimes feels like everyone's got it figured out but me, though I know that's not true.

bcnlvr
08-29-2013, 08:15 AM
Quality not quantity at my house. It still looks like a lot to me, but ds8 loves what he is doing and is done in 3-3.5 hours.

hockeymom
08-29-2013, 08:50 AM
Talk to any public schooled kid about what they do in a day and you'll feel much better! :)

Take2
08-29-2013, 09:15 AM
Yes, compared to public school, my kids are doing MUCH more. We just started this week and I have not started the "electives" yet (Spanish, typing, art) and they have a very full day. The list is short, but the content is so much deeper than what they do in school. One of my biggest challenges is trying not to compare my kids and my homeschool choices with other families (homeschooled or in a "regular" school).

dbmamaz
08-29-2013, 10:09 AM
i'm not sure we're doing more than public school. but whatever. i try to isolate myself because i'm confident i dont need to cram uninteresting info in their heads - my kids have limited interests, so i concentrate on skills, not on fighting them and making them hate me in the name of a 'superior' education

eta: and when I worry too much about my oldest, dh reminds me how much I had to remediate when I started, and i'm reminded that school was failing him AND breaking him, i'm definitely not doing worse

farrarwilliams
08-29-2013, 10:21 AM
I do. Sometimes I think we do too much. Sometimes too little. I think that means we must have it about right.

Mum
08-29-2013, 10:58 AM
Repeat after me: Less is more. ;)

skrink
08-29-2013, 11:21 AM
The beginning and the end of each school year gets me thinking this way. I'm always in a tizzy getting ready for dd's assessment, thinking "we did NOTHING this year!!", and then I look at what we've actually accomplished and I'm okay again. :) Right now I'm facing the pile of way cool curriculum I bought for this year and deciding I must be nuts to have considered it reasonable in any way.

One of my friends is a hyper overachiever, and I have had to stop talking about any of this with her. She has ivy league plans for her kids, with all of them graduating years early. If that ends up being part of dd's universe, yay for her, but it's going to be because *she* wants it, not me.

sdvelochick
08-29-2013, 11:49 AM
You are an awesome parent! It can be so hard not getting caught up in what others are doing. Homeschool isn't about parent's pride, but Kid's learning :)


One of my friends is a hyper overachiever, and I have had to stop talking about any of this with her. She has ivy league plans for her kids, with all of them graduating years early. If that ends up being part of dd's universe, yay for her, but it's going to be because *she* wants it, not me.

I love buying curriculum. I'm forever scouring the Internet for the best products.
I love this board for all the awesome recommendations, but my checking account disagrees ;)

maiziezoe
08-29-2013, 12:02 PM
I feel I am still fairly new to homeschooling (started last December) and sometimes I feel like I just don't have enough for him to do. However, when I told my best friend, who is a grade 3 teacher, what we do daily she said she thought we were doing the perfect amount and more than she teaches at her school.

Jeni
08-29-2013, 12:15 PM
It seems very few do more then we do, so I am usually always in the "Holy crap, this is too much" camp. Until we start slacking off and then the guilt kicks in. I know we do more then the public schools.

sbweldon
08-29-2013, 12:26 PM
I love researching curriculum but it does give me a complex sometimes that we're not doing enough. I'm the definition of a type A personality though so just keep telling myself to calm down and continue what is working for us.

Avalon
08-29-2013, 01:44 PM
I find it hard to fit in everything I want the kids to do in a day. We frequently do only half of what I planned. I have one kid who just plain old works slowly, but what she does is usually beautiful work, and she really thinks about what she's doing, so I can't complain about that. Also, I try to leave as much free time as possible for them to work on their own projects (without judging the quality or importance), so we normally do curriculum-related work from about 9:30 to 12, and then we stop, no matter how much or how little they got finished.

I think part of the problem is that I require a lot of household helping from the kids, too, which takes up a lot of time. Teaching them how to fold laundry, make lunch, pack for our outings, organize their own playdates, manage their allowances, etc.... It feels like I'm coaching them all day long. I wonder if some other families do more school work, but don't require as much personal responsibility from their kids.

dbmamaz
08-29-2013, 01:47 PM
yeah, my house is a disaster. and i hang out way too much on facebook. oh, well, hubby hasnt left me yet. well, actually, he did once, but it wasnt over the housework. in fact, he was never exactly clear what it was over. i have about a dozen things i think were factors. none of which were the state of the house. but he came back.

Mum
08-29-2013, 01:47 PM
I find it hard to fit in everything I want the kids to do in a day. We frequently do only half of what I planned. I have one kid who just plain old works slowly, but what she does is usually beautiful work, and she really thinks about what she's doing, so I can't complain about that. Also, I try to leave as much free time as possible for them to work on their own projects (without judging the quality or importance), so we normally do curriculum-related work from about 9:30 to 12, and then we stop, no matter how much or how little they got finished.


This.

Maybe a good litmus test would be to take all the curriculum you plan/want to do and then see how it fits into a daily or weekly schedule. It's usually at that point that I realize that I've got way more curriculum than time in a day.

RTB
08-29-2013, 02:03 PM
It is really easy for me to get hung up on time in relation to learning. My 3rd grader can usually work through our core subjects - spelling, reading, writing and math in about 45 minutes to an hour. So I started to do more, because more is better right, and they must not be learning enough. Oh good grief, not for us! Add in a few extra subjects and it added hours to our day. Maybe the people who do more, have kids with a higher tolerance for more.

summer94
08-29-2013, 03:33 PM
Whew, glad I'm not alone!

I'm still pretty new to hs'ing (starting with ds12 in January) and now I'll be hs'ing 2 kids.

It's going to be interesting because my 12 is way laid back with schoolwork, he just doesn't like it, but he'll do it because he knows minecraft is the prize of the day lol. My 9 year reminds me of my little sister...kind of a brown noser and wanna be overachiever (competitive much) lol. 12 year old HATES writing anything and much prefers the computer, 9 year old is in heaven with worksheets and busy work. This is will be an interesting year!

I'm starting off with just 3-4 core that are online classes for about a week before I get into the bookwork (mainly because I have to go to Vegas for a trade show right on the first few days of school, oh darn), but also because I think it will help ease them in and give me an idea of how long the online courses take them.

Starkspack
08-30-2013, 08:07 AM
This.

Maybe a good litmus test would be to take all the curriculum you plan/want to do and then see how it fits into a daily or weekly schedule. It's usually at that point that I realize that I've got way more curriculum than time in a day.

I love curriculum and there are so many interesting things to choose from! I am finding that I plot out what I THINK I want to do in a year with DD, but then I fall back into Avalon's and Mum's plan - we hit the basics (reading, writing, math) a certain amount each week, and then it is really up to DD what we do. We might get on a history roll for awhile, or science, or whatever. We just go with the flow. Is it disappointing not to be able to use all the curriculum I couldn't resist buying? You bet. But I still love researching it and buying some, and for now it feels like it is all about finding good fits for DD and what will keep up with her interests. And along the way, I think (I hope!) I am becoming more discerning in my choices.

OldFarmer
08-31-2013, 10:38 PM
I feel like we are just interested in too many things, too, some days. We cover a basic school curriculum each year, but add a few of our own extras (a third language and extra art, field trips, lit) and a lot of travel. It's funny, because I know my kids lives are pretty solid in terms of rote, creative and experiential learning opportunities, but still--I hear about some cool science or math or art project and think, "Sigh."

I am hoping that the wisdom to let go of a lot of the outside influences comes soon. I could use the confidence, and my kids could use a more relaxed mother.

MrsJadeDragon
08-31-2013, 10:50 PM
Do you ever look at all your curriculum and think "holy crap, this is a LOT, maybe too much!". But then see what others do/doing and thing "holy crap, this is NOT enough, WE NEED MORE!"

:confused:

This is my first year homeschooling and exactly where I am right now. Please tell me how not to freak the eff out.

Starkspack
09-02-2013, 06:13 AM
Don't freak out, Michelle. :) I think the beauty of starting HS at our DDs' age is that there is really SO LITTLE that has to be covered. I think jumping in at third grade or above would be far more terrifying. In other threads over time, books like "What your Kindergartener Needs to Know" have been debated. Some folks like them, some don't. While I see the limitations of the series, I take great relief in paging through the applicable one from time to time, just to gut check myself. There are also places online where you can see lists of what kids are "supposed" to be learning at their age/grade, and that, too, can be helpful. It is so easy to get caught up in the joy of curriculum research, that I find from time to time it is calming to look at one of these resources and think "excellent, we're covering everything we need to!"