PDA

View Full Version : Talk to me about games



summer94
08-15-2013, 12:52 AM
I'm curious, what are your favorite games that the kids actually like to play?

I want to use games as a teaching tool because I feel my snippet learner will learn more with games. Little quick facts etc.

I want to get Are you smarter than a 5th grader. But what else is there for all different subjects?

Oh, the hs kids are 4th & 6th "grade" (9 and 12 yrs old)

farrarwilliams
08-15-2013, 01:05 AM
For fun in a group...
Apples to Apples Jr. (just funny)
Dix It (encourages expressive language if younger kids are playing - just fun for everyone for older kids and adults)
Wii Party
Lego Creationary

For math...
Corners (it's one of the RS games, but you can buy it separately)
Iota (we add the score RS style)
Rat-a-Tat-Cat (still a favorite)
Zeus on the Loose (ditto)
Knock-Out
24

For logic and strategy...
Set
Mastermind
Chess

For other skills...
Mad Libs (if you consider it a game)
Bananagrams (words and spelling)
Scrambled States of America (the states)
Ticket to Ride (geography)

We have some others that are educational too. Like You've Been Sentenced for sentences. And Scrabble. And some more... Those get played less. And we have some that they've basically grown out of but aren't ready to part with, like Sleeping Queens.

Teri
08-15-2013, 01:06 AM
My kids love Settlers of Catan.

Crabby Lioness
08-15-2013, 02:35 AM
Basic mechanical physics: Boom Blox Blast Party
Big Brain Academy
Basic music theory (a vital aid in calculus): Wii Music

Gummers
08-15-2013, 06:29 AM
I don't know that any of the games I suggest are eduational...

My 10 year old loves settlers of Catan, Carcassone kids, Ticket to Ride (We have the European Map), Kings of Tokyo, Mo. They also like Zombie Dice, Fluxx, Once upon a Time, and Tsuro: The game of the path. I suppose catan, carcassone, ticket to ride, and tsuro all require certain amounts of logic/planning. Once upon a time is a story telling card game. Zombie dice requires... um, counting? :)

My 6 year old likes nothing except Candy Land, boggle, and Scrabble.

dbmamaz
08-15-2013, 10:28 AM
It sounds like you are looking more for content/quiz/trivia games? but i have no ideas, really. Well, there was this one company that made science card games (http://www.thomasleanne.com/index.html) - they were really cool. But we only ended up playing one so far, which was about the rock cycle.

I've sometimes been able to do a search for specific topics and find printable games.

I also have this website (http://www.educationallearninggames.com/) bookmarked, but have never used it

Marmalade
08-15-2013, 02:26 PM
One that I think is all around fun and slightly educational is Dicecapades. There is some trivia and some physical activities (like run into each room in the house in under 30 seconds) but there are also challenges like "In 30 seconds write down X amount of adjectives"

summer94
08-15-2013, 03:39 PM
Thanks everyone!

Ok, now here's a another one...what about "regular" games. Like ones you'd find in Target etc..?

Summer

farrarwilliams
08-15-2013, 03:58 PM
Some of the games I mentioned can be found in Target... Sequence, definitely. And Apples to Apples. And sometimes I've seen some of the Gamewright Games there - Rat-a-Tat-Cat and others.

Gummers
08-15-2013, 04:42 PM
You can order most of those games off of amazon too, if you can't find it locally.

Avalon
08-15-2013, 04:49 PM
Dominion is a GREAT game. My 10yo DS also likes Settlers of Catan, Stratego, and Ticket to Ride.

My 13yo likes Quelf. It's just about the only game she's willing to play.

farrarwilliams
08-15-2013, 04:56 PM
And, you know, now that I think of it, I think I saw Catan at the Target last time I looked at the toy section.

Little Brownelf
08-16-2013, 04:36 AM
About this time of year, Target quietly puts things on clearance in the toy department. I've picked up different things that way, like Cirkus (similar to Blockus but round.) we also have a few of the Lego Board Games which they enjoy.

They're outgrowing these, but Headbanz, Guess Who?, Monopoly Jr. And Clue Jr. were popular.

Zuzu
08-16-2013, 11:17 AM
Speaking of games, does anyone have some specific recommendations for word/language games for a 10-year-old who hates anything that involves competition? LOL. Trying to implement the Bravewriter lifestyle this year, including games, but DD does NOT like to compete. Basically anything with winning & losing is out. Some games probably lend themselves more to being adapted this way, but I'm a little bit at a loss.

dbmamaz
08-16-2013, 01:20 PM
Idk, my first thought was collaborative story telling - take turns saying a sentence. What are you trying to accomplish with the games?

ScienceGeek
08-16-2013, 01:33 PM
We just got addicted to Catan - had to buy the expansion pack because on game day everyone wanted to play. We also have Castle Panic which is fun because you all work together, either you all lose (castle is destroyed by monsters) or you all win (at least one castle wall still standing when all the monsters have been slayed). Blokus is a favorite here and it teaches spatial reasoning and critical thinking.
There's a good lewis and clark game - asks you trivia questions as you travel across the US and back. Quick pix geography was a hit with my old kid for awhile. But the math one wasn't much fun.

Zuzu
08-16-2013, 03:36 PM
What are you trying to accomplish with the games?

Mainly to add some fun learning into our regular routine -- other subjects are great, too, but writing and language arts are the specific target re: Bravewriter.

Mum
08-16-2013, 03:46 PM
DS really likes Munchkin. It's helped a lot of with reading, creating strategies, and keeping plans organized.

We didn't introduce all the cards to him at once. If you get it, message me and I'll tell you how he we started.

It's nice because the adults in the family like it too.

BarbaraH
08-16-2013, 04:33 PM
Ditto to the suggestions of SET, Catan, Blokus, and Gamewright games. Yahtzee is an easily found mainstream game that has good educational value.

In addition to the Target clearance aisle which can be fantastic, you may want to try yard sales or thrift stores. We've found over the years that the majority of games look unplayed or very lightly used. If the rules are missing you can usually find them online or the kids can make up their own. I figure if we pay $1.50 for a game and we end up just playing it once we've gotten our entertainment.

Zuzu
08-16-2013, 07:51 PM
DS really likes Munchkin. It's helped a lot of with reading, creating strategies, and keeping plans organized.

We didn't introduce all the cards to him at once. If you get it, message me and I'll tell you how he we started.

It's nice because the adults in the family like it too.

I'll check it out. Thanks!

Looks like lots of good suggestions here. Going to do some investigating on Amazon. :)

MichelleC
08-16-2013, 10:35 PM
Zuzu, Rory's Story Cubes would work. Also, any of the word building tile games (Scrabble, Appleletters, Bananagrams, etc) -- just don't bother scoring them.

I love Munchkin; it's an amusing card game based on Dungeons and Dragons.

We just got Sumoku. Haven't had a chance to try it yet, but I'm hoping it will give us a way to practice our times tables that is more fun than Math War or Times Tables Bingo.

olivebend
08-17-2013, 11:40 AM
We love Munchkin too, but I haven't tried it with my early reader. That's a good idea.

Farrar mentioned Dixit, which is on Amazon's gold box deal (http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html/ref=xs_gb_dsd_D_A2XGG3LU55H2MR?ie=UTF8&docId=1001324331&pf_rd_p=313767801&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_t=701&pf_rd_i=21&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=15JW66Z14E5XTATAQHVT) today, plus a few others - but I'm not really familiar with them all.

farrarwilliams
08-17-2013, 01:03 PM
Oh my. That's a GREAT deal for Dix It! It's usually really expensive.

Zuzu, I second some of the things others have mentioned for adding games to language arts...

* Dix It - best played in a large group, but you get to make up a sort of caption to the different pictures, which are fun to discuss and explore, is competitive, but losers can be more appreciated, kind of like in Apples to Apples, so there's less of a feeling of competition
* Story Cubes - encourages story telling
* You've Been Sentenced - you draw cards to make grammatically correct (but totally weird) sentences
* Bananagrams - you could just play the regular game but modify the rules to play differently - that's what we do - also look at the Banangrams for Kids puzzle book, which is a fun way to play with the tiles without it being competitive
* Quiddler - card game about building words
* Mad Libs - for parts of speech and coming up with interesting words

I'd love to hear any other suggestions too. I also have been wanting us to do more language games.

Mum
08-17-2013, 01:13 PM
We love Munchkin too, but I haven't tried it with my early reader. That's a good idea.


At first we took out the higher numbered monsters and the class cards and any cards related to class. We only played to Five.

It made the game simple enough to follow. After he got used to the game and didn't have to read every card over and over, we added in the rest of the cards and he loved it.

Zuzu
08-17-2013, 02:13 PM
Ooh, thanks for the Amazon link! I never look at those specials.

Thanks for the suggestions, Farrar. We have Story Cubes. Just ordered You've Been Sentenced and the Scattergories card game.

jdubbleb
08-19-2013, 01:23 PM
We still play a lot of Life, Monopoly, Checkers, Scrabble and card games (rummy, spades/euchre).

I actually use Life (modified) as a therapeutic intervention for children to get them thinking about possibilities and future goals. It helps them develop a better understanding of the thinking and behaviors required to achieve goals.

Tori
08-26-2013, 05:32 PM
We are a games loving family! We have so many games and I buy more all the time. LOL. Here's a list of the games we play, by subject: Language Arts: Word Fish (Nintendo DS) and Apples to Apples.(We use to have lots of LA Bingo games, synonyms, homonyms, punctuation, Etc, but the boys found them very boring). History: Professor Noggins: Ancient Civilizations, Computer: Age of Empires, Age on Mythology, Titan's Quest, Sims Medieval, Civilization (also available for XBOX 360), Geography: (Wii) National Geographic Challenge, Board Games: Geo Bingo, Game of the states, Passport to culture, Name that country, Bioviva. Computer: Carmen Sandiego. Math: (Nintendo Ds) Math Blasters, Other Math Games: Milk cap, Yahtzee hands down, Math War, Monopoly, Monopoly Deal, Dominoes, UNO. Science: Wild Animalopoly, Professor Noggins: Human Body. Other : My Spanish Coach (PSP), Composers card game, Artists go fish games.

Twinsmomma27
09-02-2013, 11:54 AM
My kids love
UNO
Blockus
trouble
dominoes
Space Checkers (we got this at target as a Christmas gift)
Farkle
and
battle ship

crazyme
10-25-2016, 02:23 PM
Reviving an old thread: first, because I a question about a specific game; second, because it's getting to be that gift-buying season again, and thought it would be a good thread to resurrect.

My question: does anyone play Passport to Culture? Tori mentioned it in post #27, but I don't think she is hanging around anymore, as this thread is three years old and she only has two posts. I want to work in more geography into our schedule. While most of that will focus on political boundaries, I thought this might be one good way to get in the cultural aspects, especially if it allows a person to see regional culture.

Mariam
10-25-2016, 03:24 PM
I am not familiar with that game and we use lots of games. It looks like it could be interesting though. I might consider it.

For geography I have

Where in the U.S. is Carmen Sandiego? (out-of-production)
National Geographic Global Pursuit (out-of-production)
On Assignment with National Geographic (out-of-production)
Scrambled States of America
Ticket to Ride we have the U.S. edition, but there are ones for other countries India, Europe, Nordic countries, Africa. But they are separate games, so quite an investment to see the world.

I checked out the Professor Noggin's games, which cover a huge number of topics, but they look mind-numbingly boring. They are simply trivia cards. No real game. If one use the cards and created a Trivial Pursuit type game, I could see it. I have even thought about modifying Risk to have global trivia. You take over the world with your knowledge about the world type of thing.

The reason I have so many out-of-production games is that I haunt the thrift stores on a regular basis. Our local thrift stores frequently sell games for 60 each. At under a dollar, I can modify them to modernize the information. Also it provides a great history lesson to the changing borders.

crazyme
10-25-2016, 06:35 PM
I love finding board games at thrift stores, too. Unfortunately, most of our thrift stores are pretty expensive. I found a cool Greek mythology game a year or two ago. I'll keep my eye out for the out-of-production ones you mentioned. We have Ticket to Ride, U.S. edition, but I don't think it teaches too much about geography (they labeled St. Paul as Duluth, so I insist on calling it Not-Duluth when we play ;)). That said, I would love to have some of the other editions, just because I love the game. They have a Rails and Sails edition that looks neat.

I like the idea of using trivia questions during Risk. Instead of rolling the dice, you would have to answer trivia questions. Whoever gets one wrong first, loses. It might make you reconsider taking over certain areas!

crazyme
11-10-2016, 05:53 PM
I am not familiar with that game and we use lots of games. It looks like it could be interesting though. I might consider it.

For geography I have

Where in the U.S. is Carmen Sandiego? (out-of-production)
National Geographic Global Pursuit (out-of-production)
On Assignment with National Geographic (out-of-production)
Scrambled States of America
Ticket to Ride we have the U.S. edition, but there are ones for other countries India, Europe, Nordic countries, Africa. But they are separate games, so quite an investment to see the world.

I checked out the Professor Noggin's games, which cover a huge number of topics, but they look mind-numbingly boring. They are simply trivia cards. No real game. If one use the cards and created a Trivial Pursuit type game, I could see it. I have even thought about modifying Risk to have global trivia. You take over the world with your knowledge about the world type of thing.

The reason I have so many out-of-production games is that I haunt the thrift stores on a regular basis. Our local thrift stores frequently sell games for 60 each. At under a dollar, I can modify them to modernize the information. Also it provides a great history lesson to the changing borders.

I just found National Geographic Global Pursuit at a thrift store yesterday! Thank you so much--I probably would not have bought it without your suggestion. It is quite a plain box, with absolutely no explanation of what it is (and of course, they tape the boxes shut). We spent a good part of the morning playing it! I need to weight the points awarded to questions, though, for my youngest. I helped him line up his map pieces when needed, and even added some hints to the questions, but he ended up way behind. The questions were definitely doable for him--he just doesn't have the same odds as his brother and I.

Mariam
11-10-2016, 11:17 PM
I just found National Geographic Global Pursuit at a thrift store yesterday! Thank you so much--I probably would not have bought it without your suggestion. It is quite a plain box, with absolutely no explanation of what it is (and of course, they tape the boxes shut). We spent a good part of the morning playing it! I need to weight the points awarded to questions, though, for my youngest. I helped him line up his map pieces when needed, and even added some hints to the questions, but he ended up way behind. The questions were definitely doable for him--he just doesn't have the same odds as his brother and I.

That is awesome! I am so glad you are having fun with it. Sometimes those old games can be real fun.