PDA

View Full Version : books set in South/Central America?



PrairiePoppins
07-12-2013, 12:09 PM
We're doing a World Study this year and I'm so stumped on books set in South or Central America. I do a teen book club for the local homeschoolers and we'll be doing a book per continent.

I'd prefer the book to be: a roaringly good read, suitable for boys and girls, free of graphic violence or rape (mention of them is ok, but no real descriptive suffering, especially sexual abuse).

Thanks!

Teri
07-12-2013, 12:15 PM
The Pearl by John Steinbeck (actually, Baja California)
Secret of the Andes by Ann Nolan Clark

I don't know if they are roaringly good reads, though. :p My kids enjoyed The Pearl.

atomicgirl
07-12-2013, 01:54 PM
What about "City of Beasts" by Isabel Allende? It's in part fantasy, but a fast moving story and mostly set in the Amazon.

RachelC
07-12-2013, 02:10 PM
I heart Isabel Allende, but can only vouch for her stuff for adults. I know she has several books for teens like the one AtomicGirl mentioned. Definitely worth looking into. If you are focusing on a particular area, I think it's great when the author and subject matter are from there.

RachelC
07-12-2013, 02:12 PM
Love Julia Alvarez too, but again, only familiar with her adult work.

Young Adult Latino Books (http://ccb.lis.illinois.edu/Projects/Additions%20on%209-20-07/CCB/CCB/mhommel2/youngadult.htm)

dragonfly
07-12-2013, 02:49 PM
I have no idea about the content or quality of these books, but here's a start (scroll down for book list):Planet YA: South America | Blog | Epic Reads (http://www.epicreads.com/blog/planet-ya-south-america/)

alegre
07-12-2013, 07:25 PM
How about:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51cxIVxnEyL._SL160_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-dp,TopRight,12,-18_SH30_OU01_AA160_.jpg (http://www.amazon.com/Like-Water-Chocolate-Installments-Romances/dp/038542017X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1373670731&sr=8-1&keywords=like+water+for+chocolate)

Like Water for Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies (http://www.amazon.com/Like-Water-Chocolate-Installments-Romances/dp/038542017X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1373670731&sr=8-1&keywords=like+water+for+chocolate) by Laura Esquivel (http://www.amazon.com/Laura-Esquivel/e/B000AQ0UHC/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1373670731&sr=8-1)I read it when I was 17 and loved it! It appealed to my teenage extreme-romantic-drama side. It does have some tragedy, but no explicit violence. Thinking back, I know there was plenty of romance, but don't think there was explicit sex, but you might want to check, if that matters to you and your group.

Also, I'd second (or third) Isabel Allende's "City of Beasts."

And as a complement to the reading, you might want to share this video:

"tu no puedes comprar el viento tu no puedes comprar el sol..." Calle 13 Latinoamerica.avi (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JQ9pfPdD_Wg)
It shows a wide range of scenes and people from Latin America. In Spanish, but the images speak volumes.

alegre
07-13-2013, 11:09 AM
Oops, remembered that "Like Water for Chocolate" is set in Mexico, which is North America...though culturally it is similar to Central and South America. I guess I was thinking Latin America in general.

And I'd echo RachelC:


If you are focusing on a particular area, I think it's great when the author and subject matter are from there.

yocumdeb
07-17-2013, 08:22 PM
The Pearl by John Steinbeck (actually, Baja California)
Secret of the Andes by Ann Nolan Clark

I don't know if they are roaringly good reads, though. :p My kids enjoyed The Pearl.

The Pearl was the first thing that popped into my mind as well.

Also, I have been considering using Lightning Literature by Hewitt Homeschooling. They have a world lit program the features authors and settings from Africa, Asia, and South/Latin America. I haven't read any of the books in their program yet, but they look good. It might be worth checking out.

Anonymous Me
07-18-2013, 12:57 PM
1844

"Nobody Writes to the Colonel" by Gabriel Garcia Marquez. It is set in Colombia.

I read it a long time ago, when I was in high school *eek*. And there are two things that I remember clearly: (1) the colonel had a bad tooth and the descriptions of dental pain are amazing! (2) the priest helps people "die well." I don't recall the priest being a true believer, and I still think about this idea of using religion/spiritual beliefs and to what extent they allow a person to "die well."

Magnolia School
07-21-2013, 07:11 PM
We just finished reading "Secret of the Andes (http://www.amazon.com/Secret-Andes-Puffin-Nolan-Clark/dp/0140309268)" by Ann Nolan Clark. It's great book, a relatively short read, and a nice introduction to Inca culture and the Andes mountains.Not terribly advanced reading, but I would definitely put it on my list.

Also, we listened to Jaguar (http://www.amazon.com/Jaguar-Roland-Smith/dp/0786813121/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374448611&sr=1-1&keywords=jaguar) by Roland Smith on audio. It's a mystery/thriller set in Brazil. The young male protagonist follows his dad into the jungle. I think the Andes book is better, but just throwing it all out there.