View Poll Results: What brings you the most doubt as a homeschooling parent?

Voters
99. You may not vote on this poll
  • Doubting my ability to teach specific subjects

    24 24.24%
  • Doubting whether or not I will have the patience to teach my children each day

    25 25.25%
  • Doubting whether they will receive enough socialization

    15 15.15%
  • Doubting whether our "style" of homeschooling is the best one

    12 12.12%
  • Doubting if we will be able to continue to afford to homeschool

    3 3.03%
  • Other (please share below)

    20 20.20%
Page 1 of 6 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 55
  1. #1
    Site Admin Arrived Topsy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    2,223
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default Weekly Poll: What brings you the most doubt as a homeschooling parent?

    I read a blog post this morning by a mom who was seemingly doubting everything about her choice to homeschool. It made me so sad, not only for her, but because at different times in our journey, I had felt most of the specific doubts she mentioned. Why is it often so much easier to doubt ourselves than to congratulate ourselves?

    What about you...what things are you feeling doubtful about right now?
    Topsy

    • Loyal minion, er...ADMIN of SecularHomeschool.com
    • Happy homeschooling mama to two young men - - one homeschool graduate and one high school senior
    • Lover of all things with buttons that beep and flash.
    • You can also find me over at LetsHomeschoolHighschool.com



  2. #2
    Senior Member Evolved SherryZoned's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    298
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Math! I was a high school dropout and never went to college. For many years I allowed people to make me feel bad about that. Then i woke up or grew up and said.. That does not define how smart I am or who I am. I think we can all teach our kids on any educational level because if nothing else I have you all and the internet. Without the internet I don't know if i would feel confident enough specially in math the bane of my existence.
    Pinky: Gee, Brain, what do you want to do tomorrow?
    Brain: The same thing we do every day, Pinky - homeschool the kids to take over the world!

    Terrorizing the three T's, 12, 6 and 3.

  3. #3
    PaganHSMama
    Guest

    Default

    "Doubting my ability to teach specific subjects" was my answer. I especially worry about when my daughter is older and goes into more advanced subjects. For my son, I used a cyberschool for high school, which was a great help. However, there were certain aspects of the cyberschool experience that I did not like. So, I decided to get an advanced degree instead (which I am currently working on), so that I may homeschool my daughter through graduation!

  4. #4
    Senior Member Arrived dottieanna29's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    1,186
    Blog Entries
    5

    Default

    I put doubting my patience. There are probably too many days where I just throw in the towel because no body wants to cooperate on even the littlest thing. Of course, we're just starting out and they are very young and I don't have to report to anyone....so throwing in the towel is actually not that big of a deal, at least for now.

    My second choice is probably (i know, i know, don't shoot me) the socialization. NOT because I think homeschoolers can't be "normally" socialized. Because I am an extreme introvert and I hate leaving my house. Any excuse I can come up with to not do things...it's too cold, it's too hot, it's too humid, the kids are cranky, the kids are too tired, etc. I have to really make an effort to go out and do things. Luckily, some things are pretty easy for me - homeschool gymnastics I can drop them off and sit alone in my car with a book, town rec soccer and t-ball DH can handle the majority of it. It's the purely social gatherings that I find difficult. But, I'm working on it.
    Dorothy
    Continuing to homeschool after returning to work.
    Mom to:
    Steph - sophomore (?!!) in college
    George - 8/2005
    Vicki - 7/2007
    Dottie's Homeschool Universe

  5. #5
    Senior Member Arrived dbmamaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    9,850
    Blog Entries
    7

    Default

    I put other. Socailization is honestly an issue, but not a doubt, if that makes sense. We struggle w it but I dont think that, for us, its really a home school issue - socailization was not really that great in public school much of the time. Style comes closest, but not really - i'm eclectic and i couldnt be anything else, with the weird kids i have.

    My worry is more pervasive . . . I just worry I'm not doing enough to help them be their best. I worry that I'm not teaching my teen enough problem-solving skills . . .but then I remember that its really not his strength. I worry that I'm focussing too much on college prep when he might need more practical job skills. I worry that I let him have too much free time.

    My younger is SO good at math, and I worry that i'm not pushing him more in math. The other day he spent over an hour of free time playing with the graphs in T4L tools, and discussing data, and showing me how it looked in different formats. Ok, the 'data' was how powerful different groups that were fighting were, but still. Part of me thinks I should be maximizing his achievement, while the other part thinks I need to be helping him find his way - i suspect math his way will be a powerful thing. But i'm leaning towards a 'better late then early' and mildly unschooling with him (some structure, still, but more child led) and keep doubting myself (and him? the process?)

    yeah, most of it.
    Cara, homeschooling one
    Raven, ds 10, all around intense kid
    Orion, floundering recent graduate
    22 yo dd, not at home
    Inactive blog at longsummer

  6. #6
    schwartzkari
    Guest

    Default

    I chose doubting my ability to teach specific subjects. I am fully confident that I can teach my children the basics; reading, writing, math, language arts. When it comes to the sciences though, that is tough for me. I went back to school last year to finish my teaching degree (will be finished in about 16 weeks!) so that I could have an overview of everything, including science. It has helped with my doubts...but I'm glad there are labs and other interesting experiments to help, lol.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Arrived Stella M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    4,931

    Default

    Other..again. I like what Cara said about socialisation being an issue, not a doubt. I sometimes doubt my motivations - do I homeschool because I believe in homeschooling as an educational method - or as a reaction against my own schooling and a strong feeling that I disagree with the politics of mass education ?

  8. #8
    Member Newbie Stages's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    MS
    Posts
    47

    Default

    I'm concerned about my ability to handle the additional responsibility. I'm not a very good housekeeper and I don't cook, and I'm worried that I won't be able to do everything and keep my sanity.
    Savannah- Stay-at-home mom to Holden (5) and Sadie (1) . I've done all together too much planning.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Evolved Pilgrim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    465

    Default

    I'm most worried about my patience and willingness to take this on. Second is socialization because I am somewhat of a recluse and would rather be alone most times. Plus, being a male in a small, conservative, traditional community doesn't excite me so I worry I won't get the kids out as much as they need. I'm confident in my ability to teach the subject matter.
    Dad to two: DD, 12 and DS, 8.5

  10. #10
    Senior Member Arrived Stella M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    4,931

    Default

    Pilgrim and Dorothy, speaking as an introvert, I do find that aspect of having to 'get out there' quite exhausting. Finding a balance is possible though. It helps if your children are also introverts

    I think the job helps develop patience; you don't need to be a saint any way. Kids learn from being around the real you.
    Last edited by Stella M; 01-26-2011 at 06:37 PM.

Page 1 of 6 1 2 3 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •