View Poll Results: Do you teach religion in your homeschool?

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  • Yes, we have a formal religious education curriculum

    5 8.20%
  • Yes, as it relates to other subjects

    23 37.70%
  • Yes, but only when it comes up in our curiculum

    11 18.03%
  • No, because we don't feel that religion should be studied as a subject

    0 0%
  • No, because we don't want to include religion as a part of our children's education

    9 14.75%
  • Other (elaborate in the comments)

    13 21.31%
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  1. #21
    Senior Member Guru Wilma's Avatar
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    I honestly don't know how to answer this.

    We are practicing Lutherans. My 2 older girls voluntarily do Bible reading daily. We do not have a Bible class. We discuss and study all religions as they come up. We just studied Hinduism with a study of India. When we move into Japan and the Far East we will do Buddhism. I feel very strongly that my kids needs to know what is out there and at times really wrestle with their faith, comparing it with other beliefs. In fact, really wrestle with any belief that is important. I firmly believe no belief, be it religious, moral, whatever, is really yours until you have fleshed it out and had it tested in the real world.

    But as for a formal religion class? No we don't have it.
    Ann

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    Harry, I have no idea where this will lead us, but I have a definite feeling it will be a place both wonderful and strange. - Special Agent Dale Cooper

  2. #22
    Senior Member Evolved mommykicksbutt's Avatar
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    I'm an atheist (recovering Roman Catholic), hubby is a very devout Roman Catholic (he convert from Byzantine Catholic) (yes, there have been lots of fireworks at our house over the years on the subject of our differing beliefs).

    Sonny is being forced to go through confirmation classes at hubby's church by his dad. Sonny hates it. His churchy class is every Tuesday night (cancelling other activities) for 2 long hours of BS and boredom. On Wednesday morning before school, sonny tells me all the crap that was shoved down them by the "teacher." She doesn't let the kids question her. Dialogue is one way only. But I allow sonny to find and voice any/all holes in her statements, he's a very logical thinker. I also help him with his "homework."

    He is only going through the motions of confirmation to keep his dad happy and off his back until he can be on his own. He saw what happened with his sister. Hubby insisted that she attend mass and youth group until she turned 18 (after high school graduation). She did but always with a fight. He then wanted to have the "Father-daughter-holy spirit" talk about her being responsible for her spiritual life now and she stopped him and gave him a piece of her mind on the subject... about how she has NEVER fallen for all the crap in any mythical religion invented by a bunch of ignorant illiterate nomadic desert dwelling goat herders that lived 2000 years ago and anybody who was gullible to believe such crap was delusional and a fool. It broke her dad's heart. Sonny doesn't want to do this to his dad.

    Sonny has asked that after this year (confirmation classes go until May 2011), that we do a cultural study (he knows that religion is cultural- i.e. where you are born very likely determine what religious book you will be handed) to balance out all the heavy catholic Christianity he is being exposed to. He knows there are many varying believe systems out there and wants info on them all so he can be more informed. The Teaching Company has a set of DVD courses that include the 5 major religions current in the world as well as a Cultural course. We will do those.

    Currently, you can not study history, art, or even world literature through the ages without religion's shadow being cast upon it. How can one study Charlemagne, the Spanish Inquisition, the 30 Year's War, Galileo, Dante, or the Crucible without discussing religion? Do we use a religious curriculum? Absolutely NOT. Do we address the effects of religion upon the subject currently at topic, yes, to whatever degree sonny wishes.

    Sonny claims to be an ignostic agnostic: He doesn't know whether or not if a god exists, and he doesn't care either way, he just isn't letting his dad know this yet.
    Come to the Dark Side, We Have Cookies!

    American homeschooling mom to a Mensan teen son in Spain

  3. #23
    Senior Member Evolved Fiddler's Avatar
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    Random thoughts pertaining to what I just read above--

    I teach about the various religions when they come up in curriculum (SOTW is one where it does, and often) or conversation, but don't have a set comparative religion course that I teach separately but might later if Jazz continues to homeschool through high school.

    DH and I are agnostic. He comes from a lapsed Catholic family and never attended church, and I come from a fundamentalist Christian family (whose still-practicing members are currently Pentecostal, GC Mennonite, and Presbyterian). While I try to talk with respect about my family's religion to my kids, I do make the point that they believe that their faith is the only one, and that anyone who doesn't believe it is going to hell. I think they're also getting the gist about all the trouble these "my way or the highway" religions cause from our study of history--the injustice of enslaving or killing and therefore not valuing people equally because they don't believe the "right" religion is something that has led to many an outraged look on my kids' faces, and we generally follow up with invigorating discussions.

    RE: Glee!!! I was so afraid Kurt was going to "come around" in the end, but he didn't. Soooooooo happy about that!
    Last edited by Fiddler; 10-13-2010 at 04:14 PM. Reason: remembered these messages can be read by anyone, not just members
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  4. #24
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    Glee was indeed good, but an atheist friend of mine and I were having a back and forth over her being offended by the fact that whenever atheism is portrayed in the media it's as a result of some emotional trauma rather than as a viewpoint obtained through rational thought and introspection. I let her know that screenwriters have a limited crayon box, and emotion happens to be the major color in it; not only that, but while rational thought and introspection are to be admired, they are seldom fascinating to watch on television.
    Eldest: 11, Middle: 8, Youngest: 4... Me: Old!

  5. #25
    Senior Member Guru Wilma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mommykicksbutt View Post
    I'm an atheist (recovering Roman Catholic), hubby is a very devout Roman Catholic (he convert from Byzantine Catholic) (yes, there have been lots of fireworks at our house over the years on the subject of our differing beliefs).
    I'll be honest, this completely fascinates me. I really love being around interesting people with ideas we can discuss and bat around, but I just don't know if I could be married to someone who did not share my religious or political beliefs on at least a core level. I have often wondered how James Carville and Mary Matalin have stayed married as long as they have. They have their differences and his accent!

    Anyway, kudos to you guys.

    I like snickerdoodles. If I come visit can I have some?
    Ann

    Wife to my guy, mom to 3 lovely ladies, caretaker of one small zoo


    Harry, I have no idea where this will lead us, but I have a definite feeling it will be a place both wonderful and strange. - Special Agent Dale Cooper

  6. #26
    Senior Member Evolved mommykicksbutt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wilma View Post
    I'll be honest, this completely fascinates me. I really love being around interesting people with ideas we can discuss and bat around, but I just don't know if I could be married to someone who did not share my religious or political beliefs on at least a core level. I have often wondered how James Carville and Mary Matalin have stayed married as long as they have. They have their differences and his accent!

    Anyway, kudos to you guys.

    I like snickerdoodles. If I come visit can I have some?
    "Snickerdoodles"?! You bet, not only the state cookie of Kansas but also my fav. You're invited over anytime Wilma, I'm the neighborhood's friendly atheist and I believe everyone is entitled to hold whatever believe that they think is right.

    I haven't always been an atheist, only for about the last 12 years or so. When hubby and I married we were both politically moderate and mass attending middle of the road catholics. But over the years both of our political and religious views changed. I lean more to the left, he to the right. I let him rant on about some topics keeping my opinion to myself because it will only incite an argument with him (he is always the one who losses his cool). He knows I have my opinions that are different from his and he knows that if I voice them that he will get mad so he doesn't ask me what I think on touchy subjects anymore (the marriage counselor told us never to discuss such things anymore, I refuse to engage hubby in religion no matter how much he tries to entice me.) What we do have in common is our morals and ethics (even though we attribute them differently). The bottom line is we share the same knowledge of right and wrong on the things that affect our family and us. We love and respect each other to not let our political and religious differences matter that much in our relationship. No matter how delusional he may be he's a keeper.
    Come to the Dark Side, We Have Cookies!

    American homeschooling mom to a Mensan teen son in Spain

  7. #27
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    I definitely plan on teaching about different religions to my children when it comes up in context of other studies: i.e. history, social studies, geography, philosophy... Right now we're in the pre-preschool phase so I've got time.

    As far as teaching the dogma of any particular religion, I will probably limit my teaching of that in context with what / why people believe and how it has / will affect the actions of people.

    Personally, I think every religion from Christianity to Athiesm is a plague. The notion that we can answer questions we have no knowledge base for is rediculous. While there may be redeeming lessons from a particular religion, most organized faiths have historically been used to shed personal responsibility while stripping the individual of personal rights and freedoms of it's congregation.
    Religion does not teach moral value, the best it can accomplish is to coexist and not intrude on such values.

  8. #28
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    We do not teach religion per se. But we do talk about it if it comes up. With all the family gatherings at holidays and such, it does come up. We are pagan and do talk about the Sabbats as they come up. He is a member of Spiral Scouts so religion is discussed there a bit. But most of the kids are little littles so we try to keep things lite and general. But he does ask questions, especially about the winter holidays. Santa brings gifts to Grandpa's house. Hannukah Harry brings gifts to his aunt, uncle, and cousins house, and Father Winter brings gifts to our house. However, Father Winter is not all crazy expensive like Santa. He only brings a stocking with some candy and a couple of small toys in it. We talk about the return of the light at Yule and how the days start getting longer on Yule. We also discussed that his cousins also celebrate using light with the Menorah. Grandpa believes the the Son of God was born on Christmas. We compare that to the light or the sun returning. It works for our son. As he asks questions, we will answer them as honestly as we can.
    Kathi
    Mama to 12 year old Dakota and Gramma to Homeschooling Damien, Kennedy and Ciencia all using Time4Learning.com for online curriculum.
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  9. #29
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    I think religion and school should be seperate.

  10. #30
    Junior Member Newbie sis92y's Avatar
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    Hubs is non-practicing Roman Catholic and I'm a non-practicing Pagan. For us the only reason to insert religion into our daily home studies is when it applies directly to a historical event. As our girls age hubs and I have agreed to educate them on the many different faiths so they are better equipped to make the choice which fits them best, if they chose at all. And we both agree it is more important to have faith than to have religion.

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