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  1. #1

    Default Roll Call, 9/12 - Stay safe!

    For those in the path of hurricane Florence, I hope you're able to either evacuate or ride it through safely. I have a couple of family members in its path as well, so we're hoping for the best.

    How is everyone else in the rest of this crazy country??
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward

    Daughter (21), a University of Iowa senior triple majoring in English with Creative Writing, Journalism, and Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son (20), a Purdue University junior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, and history

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  3. #2

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    Ready for a raincation here! The rain year ends at the end of this month, and we are set for the 2nd driest year on record. The last measurable rains were in March. For many years, the first rains happen on my mom’s birthday, near the end of December. So more months ahead, and October is Fire Season with the last hot spells.

    How do hurricaine evacuations work, and why are they ignored? (Is it because they are blanket evacs with no regard for elevation or situation?)
    Im a little dubious about civilian “stayers” who claim their intent is to help out others after the storm... is it a sort of hero-complex? I think there would be civically organized squads if this was truly helpful. (Our county has volunteer networks trained and prepared for our fire storms.)

    My boys go to their art, music, puppetry, and adventure classes tomorrow, it will be the first time I have a few hours away from them since... spring ended.

    Today we are going to pick up my mother-in-law’s friend, and airport runs have become a day-long event “down in the Big City”... we are going to visit the Japanese stores, a Blick Art store, and eat in ‘Little Italy’. I think it counts as Social Studies?
    Homeschooling DS11, DS5.

    Atheist.

    My spelling and typing are fine, its my keyboard that doesnt cooperate.

  4. #3

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    We miss the rain too, AM!

    We're starting fall clean-up in the garden and making it a garden/science project for our homeschool. DS and I are both feeling a bit blah/meh/uninspired about getting back into the routine. I hate to say this but the two weeks with the grandparents really wrecked our rhythm, because now DS keeps expecting to go out every day and do "fun" stuff instead of settling down to our studies. He drags things till they just feel so so tedious. It's been wearing me out.
    Homeschooling an only, DS9

  5. #4

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    I hate those disruptions too, when Im struggling to get into a routine especially!
    We had a great day yesterday - the boys had their first rice cakes from the Japanese shop (the moist filled kind, not the diet food!), and got to experience the parking and crowds of a downtown environment. (Not to mention being in a crowded italian grocer/deli surrounded by dried salted fish, and a whole slew of preserved meats and exotically shaped fresh pastas.)

    Im still trying to wrap my head around the hurricane evacuation things - in this article, they make it sound very non-chalant whether to go or not.
    https://abcnews.go.com/US/hurricane-...ry?id=57791726
    People staying because they had the week off work for vacation, and so they could deal with the fridge if the power went out?
    Another news article reported around 300,000 evacuated.... is that a lot? (300-700k is about average for SD County evacuations during big fire storms....)
    Evacuating for a rain storm seems sort of crazy though.
    I just dont know whether to believe the news, which has been known for blowing things out of proportion.
    Homeschooling DS11, DS5.

    Atheist.

    My spelling and typing are fine, its my keyboard that doesnt cooperate.

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by alexsmom View Post
    Im still trying to wrap my head around the hurricane evacuation things - in this article, they make it sound very non-chalant whether to go or not.
    https://abcnews.go.com/US/hurricane-...ry?id=57791726
    People staying because they had the week off work for vacation, and so they could deal with the fridge if the power went out?
    Another news article reported around 300,000 evacuated.... is that a lot? (300-700k is about average for SD County evacuations during big fire storms....)
    Evacuating for a rain storm seems sort of crazy though.
    I just dont know whether to believe the news, which has been known for blowing things out of proportion.
    I lived in North and South Carolina for a combined total of almost 10 years. I was there for Hurricane Fran and Hurricane Floyd. A lot of places in eastern North and South Carolina, especially on the coast, are actually below sea level. It doesn't take much rain to cause huge amounts of flooding. Many houses are built literally on the beach but are not built to withstand storm surge (super high tides created by storms) so the destruction is more severe not because of the rain storm itself but because of the houses and other buildings or structures like bridges are not being built to withstand it.

    Fran happened in September of my senior year of high school. We were out of school for 2 weeks until everything could be cleaned up. And we lived 100 miles inland from the coast. We lived in SC when Floyd hit but my now xh family still lived in NC. We couldn't even get up there to help them clean up because every bridge between us had be washed out and was impassable. Evacuating was always optional. We never evacuated but we also chose our housing with an eye toward how likely it was to flood. We tried to stay away from rivers and roads that frequently flooded even in just summer thunderstorms. If you fail to evacuate during an optional evacuation and then need rescuing, you are usually billed for it.

    When we moved to Okinawa, Japan, it was not unusual to get hit with 4 - 5 typhoons every summer (same thing as a hurricane just different name in the western Pacific), most being category 2 or 3 and at least a couple category 4 or 5. The buildings in Okinawa are built specifically to handle storm surge, high winds and lots of rain. We were never evacuated because it would have been a crazy mess to evacuate 50,000+ non-essential service member and family members from the island. But we were never worried about it because there was really no reason to evacuate. We rarely ever even lost power or internet/cable tv even in the category 5 storms. Within a day or two, all the fallen limbs and mud slides were cleared up, storm surge water pumped away and everything was back to normal. I really think the east coast of the US could learn a ton from the Okinawans about building to withstand hurricanes/typhoons. To them, it is just part of living near the ocean on a beautiful island, not a catastrophic event.

  7. #6
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    I always assumed that it was the after storm flooding that really caused havoc - disrupting reliable drinking water supplies and causing problems with road travel (making access to food, medical care difficult).

    All is well here, just really busy due to the holidays. The kids have started their outdoor science class and both really enjoy it. I'm excited because DS pooh-poohs most classes. We have a break between DS's class and DD's class so we've been taking a picnic and hiking off into the forest. It is lovely. I think Tuesday is going to be my favorite homeschool day this semester!

    We are headed out to camp this weekend, and I'm looking forward to some cooler air, it is still hot in the city!

    Stay safe everyone.
    Last edited by RTB; 09-13-2018 at 11:53 PM.
    Rebecca
    DS 13, DD 11
    Year 7

  8. #7

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    AM- love mochi (rice cakes) really miss Hawaii and all the awesome Asian food. I think the reason lots of people don't evacuate is they don't have the funds to stay somewhere else or pay for gas to sit in traffic to get somewhere else. In Katrina, thousands of people in New Orleans didn't have cars and didn't have the money to pay for other transportation. In NC, much of the rural areas are incredibly poor and it costs bucks they just don't have to get out of the area. I know there are shelters that people can get to, but I think many of them don't have the means to get to the shelter.

    Things are going well with the kiddos and DS10 is very happy to be participating in the local public school band - they were very happy to have him! Glad you all are well!
    Beth
    DS16 with ASD, DD12 and DS10

  9. #8

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    AM - from what I'm reading, many don't evacuate because they don't have a place to go that will take them AND their pets. So they stay for the pets. Seems a little screwy, since all of you (humans AND pets) may pay a price for staying anyway??
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward

    Daughter (21), a University of Iowa senior triple majoring in English with Creative Writing, Journalism, and Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son (20), a Purdue University junior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, and history

  10. #9

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    Hi all We have been away on a short vacation. Fitted in a horse trek, cross country skiing, some hiking, and lots of relaxing outdoors (stayed in a rural apartment above someones garage). There were 2 dogs on the property who quickly coopted the DD's into their pack and spent all day chilling out with them for pats and games, but as soon as an adult went out, the dogs slinked off.

    Now I am computer-less as my Macbook Air was having a seemingly minor issue with random shutdowns. So I took it in (luckily still under extended warranty) for a check, and now they are replacing the logic board. It has all turned out to be much longer than expected. So I don't have much computer time as I have to fit in time on the desktop around when the DD's use it (little bit of school work and TV). So I have been trying not to come on here because then I would just while away my time reading posts when I really need to work.

    Spring is well on its way here, so also trying to keep up with the flourishing growth in the garden.

    Hope you are all well!
    New Zealand-based homeschooler of DD 10 (year 5 [NZ system]) who is gifted with processing speed issues, and trialing it with DD 5 (year 0 [NZ system]) who is a whirlwind of energy.

    Freelance copyeditor, specializing in scientific text, who will make mistakes in my posts (I don't self-edit).

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Roll Call, 9/12 - Stay safe!