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Thread: Article: "I was naive about Common Core".

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    Senior Member Evolved
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    Post Article: "I was naive about Common Core".

    -Angela.

    Unschooling one son (7).

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    Senior Member Evolved mpippin's Avatar
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    Until we, as a nation, stop relying on standardized testing as a measure of efficacy in the classroom, nothing is going to change, no matter what shiny new label we apply. It's good to hear a principal speaking out against common core and the testing process in general.
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    Michelle

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    Senior Member Evolved Oceanseve's Avatar
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    "A fool with a tool is still a fool. A fool with a powerful tool is a dangerous fool."

    Oh how I love that!
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    Tamarin - 7, Lemur - 6, Howler - 4, and Capuchin - 1.

    Six Monkeys in the Country, my blog about homeschooling, farm life, raising young children and my ridiculous opinions.

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    Senior Member Arrived Accidental Homeschooler's Avatar
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    It is just going to lead to more people homeschooling.

    We have Pearson here. It is a huge employer. I read something recently about the drive to privatize education and the money that this will cause to flow into corporate coffers, like Pearson.
    Julie,
    home schooling two dds 16(still waters) and 8(force of nature)

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    Senior Member Arrived farrarwilliams's Avatar
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    Yes. Everyone is in the honeymoon stage with this thing and I think it's going to come to a crashing end very soon. For one thing, the testing results, which are going to be abysmal, are going to start coming back.

    I don't think that realistically the assessment can go away because there's no political cover for it and there should be accountability when the government is paying for schooling - when there was less accountability before NCLB and especially about a decade before that when state testing wasn't even being done much, there was almost no accountability and some schools thrived and many were death traps where no one did anything - and as much as I hate to admit it, test prep would have been a better thing to do in some of these schools... but that's why I think it has to be diversified... It could go terribly wrong, but I think it might fulfill the real need to do some type of assessment and take the pressure off the individual elements of testing.
    Disclaimer: Everything I'm saying is just my own opinion, based on my own experiences teaching and with my own kids and my own life. You should just ignore me if I'm annoying you. I don't mind.

    But if I don't annoy you, feel free to visit my blog:
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    Senior Member Evolved mpippin's Avatar
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    When I went to school in New England, we took the California Achievement Test each year. But there was no stress about it. We didn't spend weeks preparing for it. There weren't daily announcements about the importance of the test. The school didn't send home letters instructing our parents to be sure they fed us and made us sleep so we would score well. The one thing I DO remember being stressed was to bring two number-2 pencils with us for the test. I'm not saying let's do away with testing, although wouldn't that be lovely in theory? I'm saying let's get back to the point where less emphasis was placed on testing, and less stress was passed down to the student.

    I think it's wishful thinking, though. Such an overhaul would be required in order to get our school systems to shift alignment away from hyperfocusing on test results. Call me a pessimist, but I don't see it happening anytime in soon.
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    Michelle

    Bay - high school? How the hell did that happen?
    Tuna - upper elementary


    The Eclectic Education of Terrific Tuna

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    Senior Member Arrived farrarwilliams's Avatar
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    Yes, I mostly agree. The thing is... some of the schools back then were just written off year after year. Every kid in a class failing was just par for the course at such schools - it was expected and no one did anything about it year after year. So while people many kids were at schools where it was a net positive, some kids weren't. That's part of why I think we can't really go back to before NCLB time. And, as much as I loathe NCLB, I will give it credit for that. Every single educational reform for decades were excusing these low performing schools and NCLB refused to do that, which is part of the reason it was such a difficult pill.

    I don't know. There's just no political reason to *lessen* the standards. Even though everyone thinks the testing is wrong, if you make the tests easier or drop them or something, then the only way to politically spin it is that you dropped standards and abandoned our poor children.
    mpippin and SusanC like this.
    Disclaimer: Everything I'm saying is just my own opinion, based on my own experiences teaching and with my own kids and my own life. You should just ignore me if I'm annoying you. I don't mind.

    But if I don't annoy you, feel free to visit my blog:
    http://farrarwilliams.wordpress.com
    Children's Books, Homeschooling and Random Musings...

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    Senior Member Evolved Oceanseve's Avatar
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    Locally a principal changed grades to stay in good graces with the feds for funding. They just figured it out in November, he was fired and now they are trying to get the graduating class adequate enough to pass. I don't think they are sure how long he'd been skewing things. So there are schools that are getting left behind either way unfortunately.

    More than half of Douglass seniors not ready to graduate | KFOR.com

    Just pointing out it still happens. Does it happen less? I sure hope so.......
    Tamarin - 7, Lemur - 6, Howler - 4, and Capuchin - 1.

    Six Monkeys in the Country, my blog about homeschooling, farm life, raising young children and my ridiculous opinions.

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    Senior Member Enlightened Kimberlapoderosa's Avatar
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    They don't have high stakes tests in Finland and they are number one for education. We need to be accountable to our students, but I don't see how it helps to teach the test. Plus we've watered down the standards so badly that most kids are not getting the level of instruction that they should. My neighbors think their kids are geniuses because they passed/advanced on all of the last state tests. I hate to tell them how incredibly easy that test really is.

    When I taught fifth grade we started doing test prep from day one. Then in January we bumped it up to doing practice tests. By May they could tell you that James Madison was the "father of the constitution" no matter how the question was asked, but they really had not idea what that meant. I worked in a Title one school. 100% of the kids at our school were on free lunch. I had a very high pass rate for my students on all of the tests, but I never felt like I was teaching them as I should.
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    Kimberly, homeschooling DS 12 and DS 7

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    Senior Member Enlightened WhatEverWorks's Avatar
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    I don’t see a big difference in the idea of common core compared to any other prescribed list in that they are all just big lists of what to teach when. The problem, to me, is the notion that all students’ are at the same level with the same needs which can be addressed with state or nationwide objectives. I know that differentiation is supposed to come into play, but it is just for delivering the content and does not change the scope of the content.

    Common Core is one of the reasons we pulled my son out of public schools this year. That was because his ELA teacher was clueless how to teach these new standards, was trying to get all fancy, and as a result important basic stuff was left out. I’m still on the email list for his core teachers and just yesterday read that 61 out of 100 kids on his team are currently failing a core subject. These kids have always done well in past years. So, where is the problem? It has to be the teachers, the content, or the assessments.

    We include all the standards because eventually he will return to public school. However, I haven’t found any element for any subject that seemed complete. I’m supplementing left and right to get in the concepts and understanding I think he’ll actually need.

    What’s really sad is that these standards are still heads above what we used to have here. Adding requirements for analytical skills instead of just rote memory is huge.
    Son - 7th grade, HS
    Daughter - 10th grade, PS
    Blog Ė in progress, Home Schooling in 7th Grade

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